Archive for 2009

December 31, 2009

Motor Carrier Inspectors Mark Final Day On Job

42 Jobs Eliminated To Cut Costs

Stacia Matthews reporting

INDIANAPOLIS -- The final day of the year marked the last day on the job for 42 inspectors with the Indiana State Police Motor Carrier Division.

The state eliminated about half of the workforce of the division tasked with inspecting large trucks and school buses in an effort to trim costs.

On Thursday, the employees who were let go lined up at the state police garage to return their vehicles and say goodbye to friends and colleagues, 6News' Stacia Matthews reported.

"It's tough day," one inspector said. "It's very unfortunate that this is going on, but it's just very tough."

Forty-one motor carrier inspectors now make up the civilian force, in which employees don't carry weapons and are strictly limited to enforcement of motor carrier laws.

Beginning on Friday, state troopers will be assigned additional duties once carried out by the inspectors.

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Trooper Beal Memorial

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Traffic Safety Partners

Many thanks to all of you – engineers, educators, advocates, law enforcement officers, and emergency responders – who together with a more cautions and compliant motoring public contributed to the reduction of death, suffering and economic loss on Indiana roadways in 2009. I have attached the latest INDOT crash snapshot, which we use as a broad view barometer of statewide safety performance. In examining fatal crashes, severe crashes (those that result in either a fatality or incapacitating injury) and serious crashes (those that result in either a fatality or any injury) monthly since January 2003, the patterns are encouraging:

December 30, 2009

Indiana traffic related deaths lowest in more than 80 years

Traffic Safety Partners

The Governor held a very well attended press conference this morning to speak specifically about Indiana recording the lowest number of traffic related deaths since 1925.  This is the sixth consecutive year Indiana has shown a reduction in traffic fatalities, a 28 percent drop.  If you go back just ten years, to 1999, Indiana has reduced its fatalities on the roadways by 1/3.  This is a tremendous accomplishment that cannot be attributed to one individual, program or organization, but to all of you traffic safety advocates working together.  Some additional notes to consider that led to this reduction besides what you can find in the press release:

•         Indiana’s overall observed seat belt usage rate climbed to a record high of 92.6 percent in 2009. This eight point increase in seat belt usage over the past four years translates into an estimated 529,273 additional Indiana motorists buckling up.

•         Although Hoosiers drove the same number of miles in 2009 as 2008, the number of fatalities still decreased 16 percent.

•         According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Indiana had the fifth lowest percentage of alcohol related fatalities in the nation, 26 percent, for 2008. This is considerably lower than the national average of 32 percent of alcohol related fatalities (.08% BAC or greater).

•         Programs totaling over $8.5 million in federal grants were awarded by ICJI to over 250 law enforcement agencies throughout Indiana, to support traffic safety enforcement in 2008 and 2009.

•         ICJI awarded federal grants to enable local law enforcement agencies to fund overtime enforcement. These extra enforcements resulted in 8,975 DUI related citations, 113,497 seat belt citations, 100,213 speeding citations, and 2,228 child restraint citations from October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2009.   

Although this is great news, there is still room for improvement with over 680 deaths occurring in 2009 on our roadways.  With a 92.6 percent seat belt rate we are still showing that 44 percent of individuals killed in car crashes in 2008, where restraint usage was known, were unrestrained.  And although a 26 percent alcohol related fatality rate is low, with regards to the national average, it is still inexcusable and a 100 percent preventable factor leading towards over a quarter of our fatalities.   

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New method for tracking meth

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---State Police are stepping up the fight against meth labs across the state. It's part of a project they've been working on for more than a year.

The law limits the amount of pseudoephedrine you can purchase.  Meth cooks found a way to skirt the law. Authorities discovered a way to crack down.

<<<Indiana State Police F/Sgt. Niki Crawford

State Police have been experimenting with an electronic database to track the sale of pseudoephedrine, which is a primary ingredient in methamphetamine. But they've had to use another state's server. Now, Indiana will be able to set up its own database thanks to a grant State Police received this month.

Under state law, a single person can only buy 24 pills containing pseudoephedrine every week. Right now, there isn't a computerized system to track who buys the pills. Police have to manually compare pharmacy logs to look for matches. That means if a pill buyer goes to another town, there's a lesser chance of getting caught. Authorities say going electronic will change that.

"This system is built to create an environment where law enforcement can be much more efficient," said ISP 1st Sgt. Niki Crawford. "It's probably not going to reduce our meth labs."

In fact, police said the number of meth lab seizures will probably go up. This year alone, lab arrests are up 25 percent over last year and that's without a complete electronic database. Currently, only a few major retailers, like Target and Walmart, are helping with the testing phase.

State Police said they need to get the smaller Mom and Pop stores to go electronic so they can launch the permanent system.

In addition to logging every pseudoephedrine purchase, the database will also track meth lab tips and DEA information. Investigators said it'll easily allow them to cross reference suspicious buys with previous arrests. They'll also be able to quickly connect people known as "smurfs."

"Smurfing is when a group of individuals go from store to store buying the maximum amount at each store. Their combined purchase violates the law, but the single purchase does not," said Sgt. Crawford.

Police said the goal of tying everything together is to bust more meth cooks and make the community a safer place.

State Police expect all Indiana pharmacies to be submitting pseudoephedrine sales information electronically within six months.

The database will only log suspicious purchases, so if you buy a box of pseudoephedrine to cure your cold, authorities will not be able to search you're information. 

December 29, 2009

A Tale of Trends Law Enforcement Fatalities 2009

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FLEEING SUSPECT TRIGGERS POLICE DRAGNET

Fugitive Arrested is James Allen Henderson

NEW LONDON, INDIANA---A man who fled from two Howard County Sheriff Deputies after telling them he was armed and not going back to prison triggered an extensive police dragnet Monday afternoon.  More than twenty county, city, and state officers, as well as three police K-9’s responded to the New London area after the deputies were threatened.  Arrested was James Allen Henderson, 34, of the 1600 block of West Broadway Street, KokomoHenderson faces a warrant charge of class D felony invasion of privacy, and additional counts of resisting law enforcement, disorderly conduct, and attempted escape.  Shortly after 2:00 p.m. Deputies John Michael Cipriano and Steve Holland went to a residence at 7610 W 226 South in New London after receiving information that Henderson could be located there.  Deputies knocked, but no one would answer the door.  Deputies set up surveillance on the home, and after a short time a male subject exited the residence.  “Deputy Cipriano was familiar with Henderson, and recognized him.  When Henderson was approached he stuck his hand in his sweatshirt pocket and threatened that he had a gun.  He also stated he was not going back to prison,” said Sheriff Marty TalbertHenderson turned and ran east through New London, and into a wooded area.  Deputies requested additional assistance while tracking Henderson through the snow.  “Most officers dread snow and ice because it oftentimes causes traffic problems, but today (Monday) the snow allowed officers to track Henderson’s flight,” said Talbert. 

The request for emergency assistance brought ten deputies, seven Kokomo City Police officers, one Russiaville Officer, and five State Troopers headed into the area.  “We did not want Henderson to get into a residence, or accost somebody driving down the road,” said Major Steve Rogers.  “Our goal was to contain him as quickly as possible within a defined perimeter until we could get a police K-9 to the scene,” Rogers added.  Off duty Deputy Mike Miller was responding to the manhunt when he observed a person running in a farm field north of 6348 W. CR 250 South.  The individual went to the ground as Miller drove by.  “Deputy Paul Cherry and K-9 Canto were in the area in one of the Sheriff Department’s four wheel drive pick up trucks.  Miller jumped in on the passenger side, and the two officers drove into the field to investigate.  Henderson got up and attempted to run, but he was quickly apprehended by Deputy Miller and K-9 Canto,” said Talbert.

“Kudos to Chief Rob Baker and his officers for their immediate response,” said Talbert.  Henderson had fled from Kokomo officers attempting to serve the Howard Superior Court 1 bench warrant at the West Broadway Street address on Christmas Eve.  Henderson was able to elude officers in the residential neighborhood.  “I also want to thank the County Council and the County Commissioners for allowing our K-9 officers to have four wheel drive pick up trucks.  Having the right equipment made a tremendous difference in terminating this foot chase.  Having take home cars and off duty use of our police cars allowed us to get additional deputies to the area very quickly,” he added.     

Henderson continued to resist even after he was placed in handcuffs for transport to the jail.  “Officers had to stop in West Middleton and place Henderson in leg shackles.  He was intent on escaping Christmas Eve, and he was bound and determined to avoid arrest Monday afternoon,” added RogersHenderson ran more than one mile through wooded areas, brush, creeks, and farm fields with deputies and Kokomo Police officers in pursuit.  It took authorities just shy of an hour in below freezing temperatures to apprehend Henderson.  Deputy Steve Holland suffered minor injuries after slipping on a patch of ice during the foot chase.  “Deputy Cipriano did an outstanding job during this lengthy pursuit.  This type of incident typifies the dangers police officers face every day,” the Sheriff added.  Authorities did not locate a weapon on Henderson at the time of his arrest.  Henderson’s bond on the bench warrant was set at $10,000, with no 10% allowed. 

Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of any wanted person is asked to contact the Howard County Sheriff Department at (765) 457-1105, or the Central Indiana Crimestoppers at (800) 922-5378.

December 28, 2009

Escaping a car in the water

Please take a few minutes to review the video

submitted by Detective May from District 51 

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Indiana State Police assist Austin Police end standoff peacefully

AUSTIN, INDIANA---Police said a standoff where a man was holding a toddler hostage in Austin, Indiana, Saturday night ended peacefully.

Officers were called to a home on Factory Drive at about 10:30 as a domestic disrupted between a man and his girlfriend.

<<<Austin Police Chief Donald Spicer said the woman left and the man barricaded himself inside the home with a 2-year-old child.

The Clark County Sheriff's Department and Indiana State Police were called in assist Austin Police.

The standoff ended peacefully about an hour later.

Spicer said they were able to negotiate the man's surrender by telephone.

The child was not harmed during the standoff.

The identity of the man has not been released. Police said they plan to file charges against the man.

December 26, 2009

Indiana state police changing ‘zones’

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA---Beginning Sunday, the local Indiana State Police district is geographically realigning its road troopers.

Currently, troopers work in set zones. In northeastern Indiana, there are two zones: Steuben-DeKalb and Noble-LaGrange. Troopers in Noble County may be called upon to go to LaGrange County, but not elsewhere on a regular basis.

 The new zones to be implemented Sunday will change the zones to Steuben-LaGrange and DeKalb-Noble.

<<<Sgt. Ron Galaviz

The goal, according to Indiana State Police public information officer Sgt. Ron Galaviz, is to prevent traffic accidents, particularly fatalities.

“The vast majority of the crashes we work involve the interstate,” Galaviz said. “That’s the impetus (behind the change).

“Every county in our nine-country district now has access to the interstate.”

Before Sunday, the state police had seven troopers in Steuben and DeKalb counties who could work the interstate. Beginning Sunday, that number will swell to 13 with the addition of the six troopers working Noble and LaGrange counties.

As of the middle of December, the state has recorded approximately 100 fewer fatalities statewide than during the same period in 2008, roughly cutting the number of deaths on Indiana roadways from 800 to 700.

According to Galaviz, it is hope the change instituted by district commander Lt. Rob Townsend will reduce the total even further.

“We’re looking to try to help improve that,” Galaviz said. “Trying to save lives is what we’re trying to do.”

According to Galaviz, having more troopers at the scene of crashes that do happen will also help get the area cleared more quickly, reducing what he called secondary crashes, or crashes that occur when traffic is congested because of a crash that has already taken place.

Galaviz said approximately 20 percent of all crashes are secondary.

Currently, state troopers do more than patrol major roadways, writing warnings or tickets. They are involved in criminal investigations, and spend a lot of their time assisting other police agencies. None of that will change with the change in zone configurations, according to Galaviz.

Will area counties notice the difference on Sunday when the Indiana State Police realigns the zones its individual troopers work?

Steuben County Sheriff Rick Lewis said he doesn’t expect a big change with the realignment in his county, but he noted there could be an increased state police presence.

“Hopefully we’ll see more coverage with the state police,” Lewis said. “They’ve been spread pretty thin.”

LaGrange County Sheriff Terry Martin said he also doesn’t expect a large impact from the move, either.

“I don’t think it changes anything for us,” Martin said. “I don’t see a big problem for us.”

December 21, 2009

Girls Attacked Trooper During Traffic Stop

Four Teens Arrested Sunday

PORTAGE, INDIANA---Four teenagers who said they were on their way to church attacked a state trooper during a traffic stop on Sunday, police said.

<<Master Trooper Dave Eggers stopped the car just before 10 a.m. for speeding on Interstate 94 westbound at the 19.7 mile marker near Portage, police said.

The driver -- Olivia A. Smith, 18, of Michigan City -- told Eggers that she didn't have a driver's license, but that she and her three teenage passengers were on their way to church in Merrillville.

When a tow truck came to pick up the car, Eggers said Smith left her vehicle and confronted the truck driver, while a 14-year-old passenger began arguing with Eggers, he said.

The 14-year-old girl pulled on Egger's shirt, and Smith joined in, refusing to give him the keys to the car, Eggers said.

When they left their car a second time, Eggers said Smith and the 14-year-old began punching and kicking him, along with two other girls in the car, 15 and 17 years old.

Officers and deputies who arrived at the scene shortly after helped break up the fight, police said. All received minor injuries.

The 14-year-old, 15-year-old and 17-year-old were taken to Porter County Juvenile Detention and charged with resisting law enforcement, while Smith was transported to the Porter County Jail and charged with resisting law enforcement and driving while never obtaining an operator's license.

December 18, 2009

State Troopers Deliver Pizza and Toys to Head Start Children

Trooper John Myers (left) and Sergeant Richard Myers (right) with the children

 Christmas was delivered with a police car by Indiana State Troopers on Wednesday, December 16th, to the children attending the Cloverdale Head Start program on State Road 42 approximately one mile west of US 231.

Sergeant Richard Myers and Trooper John Myers from the Putnamville State Police Post provided a pizza party and delivered a toy, toboggan hat and gloves to each of the seventeen boys and girls enrolled in the Head Start program. The Indiana State Police Alliance and Cops for Kids provided the money for the gifts and pizza while troopers and their families shopped for the toys and wrapped them.

Cops for Kids of Indiana, Inc. were incorporated in 1991 under the direction of the Indiana State Police Alliance Board of Directors. ISPA Vice President Greg Oeth chairs the Cops for Kids Screening Committee, which seeks out those opportunities where Cops for Kids of Indiana can make a difference in the lives of deserving children. Cops for Kids have been instrumental in supporting hundreds of youth programs, building strong relationships between our kids and those officers sworn to serve and protect.

Further information on Cops for Kids can be found at the Indiana State Police Alliance website (www.indianasfinest.com) or by calling (317) 636-0929.

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Let's stay in touch via E-Mail at least

Dear MCI Personnel,

I am attempting to develop an e-mail distribution list comprised of your personal e-mail addresses. I will utilize this distribution list to keep in touch with you.  I am sure you have your preferred contacts already established, and that is fine.  I simply wish to offer one more option in your points of contact with the Department.

Another way to stay informed is to visit regularly the various ISP related websites.  Additionally, information alerts are sent out by some of our retirees.  Ronnie Kane nrcc@verizon.net and Don Cox dlcox@earthlink.net  do a great job of keeping their ear to the rail and they send out news updates and 10-0 information.  They are good about adding additional recipients to their distribution lists. 

Best Regards,

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Anthem recently sent this important email regarding Radiology Associates Inc.  Please click on above URL to review the attachments concerning affected facilities.  I will keep personnel apprised of any changes in the status of the negotiations. 

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All ISP Personnel:

Anthem recently sent this important email regarding the Suburban Health Organization. 

I will keep personnel apprised of any changes in the status of the negotiations. 

Brad Scully

Recently, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield has been in contract negotiations with Suburban Health Organization, which operates seven hospitals in the Indianapolis metropolitan area. The current contract expires at midnight December 31, 2009, and while we are both pleased with the progress and are hopeful we can reach an agreement before the expiration for the current contact, we want to keep you informed of the ongoing negotiations. 

If we do not come to terms on a new contract, the following hospitals would be considered out of network effective January 1, 2010:

If a termination were to occur, it would affect policyholders in the following plans:

We will continue to work hard in trying to keep Suburban Health Organization in our network. You have entrusted Anthem to provide your clients with access to affordable, quality health care. Our goal is to reach agreement on a fair contract that is in the best interests of our customers.

Again, we are hopeful that these negotiations will come to a successful conclusion soon. Please contact your sales account representative if you have any questions.

Sincerely

Rick Rhodes
Vice President, Sales
Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Indiana

December 15, 2009

Troopers' off-duty use of vehicles under question

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---Indiana state troopers are being asked to make sure they log runs while off-duty as the trooper's union tries to avoid the loss of off-duty use of vehicles.

The state has reduced its fleet of vehicles, parking 2,500 according to some sources. An internal memo sent to agency heads last month suggested carpooling as a way to reduce the use of state-owned vehicles even further.

"[We] want to reduce to the number absolutely necessary to do the business of the state. We've still got some room to go there," said Governor Mitch Daniels.

One agency, however, has remained untouched - Indiana State Police. It has maintained all official vehicles for both use on the job and, in the case of state troopers, off the job as well. They're allowed to drive anywhere in the state with anyone in their patrol car for any purpose. The gas and maintenance is covered by taxpayers.

"The purpose for the use of the car off-duty is for the additional presence of the police car, for the effect that it has when the motoring public sees a police vehicle. They tend to drive a little differently, a little more carefully," said ISP 1st Sgt. Dave Bursten.

Indiana State Police does not keep records of the breakdown of how much troopers drive on and off the clock. They only record a total number of miles driven each month, so it's impossible to know how much it's costing taxpayers for off-duty vehicle use.

But even a rough estimate suggests the state is spending millions. If 1,000 of the state's 1,300 troopers drive 5,000 off-duty miles each year, using state standards for mileage reimbursement, that adds up to $2 million. That's so much money, the State Police Alliance, the union that represents troopers, asked them last week to be vigilant in calling in off-duty activity, so off-duty use of their vehicles can be justified.

"Something we will never be able to quantify is the number of lives that were potentially saved because an off-duty trooper responded," Sgt. Bursten said.

Late Monday afternoon, ISP provided their own estimate for off-duty usage, which they say is around $700,000 for gasoline alone.

State Police does keep records for off-duty activity. In the past 10 months, for example, troopers have responded to more than 7,400 assistance calls assisted other departments 2,200 times and wrote nearly 1,000 tickets.

December 14, 2009

Santa Jack makes 25th appearance at ISP Peru Post

Peru – Recently, 33 children and grandchildren of Indiana State Police employees and retirees were treated to a Christmas party attended by Santa Claus. All of the children were given a present after revealing their holiday gift wishes to Santa.  

This was the 26th year for the annual tradition which was started by retired Indiana State Police dispatcher Ginny Kelley. The party serves as a fun event that allows children of police employees to come together and celebrate the holiday season, and of course meet Santa Claus. The children have changed over time, but one constant for the past twenty-five years is Jack Rich as Santa Claus.

Jack Rich served the Indiana State Police for almost 33 years, retiring in 1990 with the rank of sergeant. After retiring from the state police, Rich served eight years as the Miami County sheriff.  He has had a rough couple of years with the passing of his wife Linda, and the line of duty shooting death of his youngest child Indiana State Police Master Trooper Detective David Rich.

“Anyone who has met Jack knows he has a very infectious, warm, and caring personality, “stated Jodie Miller, ISP Peru Post secretary and current organizer of the kids Christmas party. “Despite the unfortunate events of the last few years, no one is surprised that he continues to bring holiday cheer to numerous children every year.”

A conservative estimate of approximately 800 children have told Jack their holiday gift requests as parents stood nearby taking copious notes. Most of those children grew up thinking Jack Rich was truly Santa Claus himself, including his youngest grandchildren who recently realized grandpa was playing a role. They are now under the impression grandpa is Santa’s helper.

“I look forward to the party every year,” stated Jack Rich “To play a small role in bringing the magic of the Christmas season to a child is well worth the sore lap.”

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Troopers Presented Awards for Service and Safe Driving

no photos submitted

Putnamville- Recently at the District 53 Post meeting, Lieutenant Dan Jones, Commander of the Putnamville State Police Post, presented awards to troopers. Troopers were presented awards for their years of service with the department and for the number of miles they have driven without being involved in a vehicle crash.

The following is a list of the officer’s and the award they received:

Master Trooper Doug Perry…………………25 years of service

Lieutenant Dan Jones………………………..20 years of service

Master Trooper Dave Furnas………………..20 years of service

Master Trooper/Detective Brian Smith……...20 years of service

Senior Trooper Jeff Finchum………………..10 years of service

Sergeant Chip Sunier………………………...1,000,000 safe driving miles

Sergeant Dave Cox………………………….700,000 safe driving miles

Trooper John Myers………………………….50,000 safe driving miles

“This is just a sample of the men and women troopers that go above and beyond daily to serve the citizens and visitors of the State of Indiana” stated Lieutenant Jones. “We are proud to have these officers’s serving at the Putnamville Post.”

December 11, 2009

Indiana state troopers offered early retirement deal

Cuts lead to deal for veteran ISP officers

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---A tight budget has prompted Indiana State Police to try trimming its force.

An offer was put on the table to entice some officers to leave. The new proposal offers a cash incentive to get hundreds of veteran state police officers to retire early.

"There's a plan called a partial lump sum disbursement plan that's eligible for people that can retire now or can retire by March 31 of the new year," said ISP Sgt. Dave Bursten.

Officers with over 20 years on the job packed a mandatory meeting at the Motor Carrier Division on the south side Friday. It's the same place where 40 employees lost their jobs on Monday.

The president of the State Police Alliance, Sergeant Wayne Flick, didn't want to talk about what was happening inside. But Sgt. Bursten said the offer is part of the state plan to cut the budget.

"We are operating off the taxpayers’ dime and we have to make use of it," he said.

Hundreds of state police across the state now have to make big decisions about their futures.

Sgt. Perry Hewitt said at this point in his life, he's not sure if the deal is the right move for him.

"Got my facts and figures, going to crunch some numbers and talk to some financial planners and see how it works," he said.

Major Carlos Pettiford doesn't plan to retire.

"The lump sum will work for some people. It just depends on your financial situation and where you're at in life. I'm still enjoying the job. I like what I'm doing and I plan on working," he said.

Other meetings are scheduled around the state.

Those who qualify for the deal have until February 1 to make a decision.

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"A Different Christmas Poem"  

cid:E1DFD2A8B44947369B405373CD3B076F@shared.co.wayne.in.us
 
The embers glowed softly, and in their dim light,
I gazed round the room and I cherished the sight.
My wife was asleep, her head on my chest,
My daughter beside me, angelic in rest.
Outside the snow fell, a blanket of white,
Transforming the yard to a winter delight.    
 The sparkling lights in the tree I believe,
Completed the magic that was Chris tmas Eve.
My eyelids were heavy, my breathing was deep,
Secure and surrounded by love I would sleep.
In perfect contentment, or so it would seem,
So I slumbered, perhaps I started to dream.  
The sound wasn't loud, and it wasn't too near,
But I opened my eyes when it tickled my ear.
Perhaps just a cough, I didn't quite know,
Then the sure sound of footsteps outside in the snow.
My soul gave a tremble, I struggled to hear,
And I crept to the door just to see who was near.    
 Standing out in the cold and the dark of the night,
A lone figure stood, his face weary and tight.
A soldier, I puzzled, some twenty years old,
Perhaps a Marine, huddled here in the cold.
Alone in the dark, he looked up and smiled,
Standing watch over me, and my wife and my child.    
 "What are you doing?" I asked without fear,
"Come in this moment, it's freezing out here!
Put down your pack, brush the snow from your sleeve,
You should be at home on a cold Christmas Eve!"
For barely a moment I saw his eyes shift,
Away from the cold and the snow blown in drifts..
To the window that danced with a warm fire's light
Then he sighed and he said "Its' really all right,
I'm out here by choice. I'm here every night."
"It's my duty to stand at the front of the line,
That separates you from the darkest of times.  
No one had to ask or beg or implore me,
I'm proud to stand here like my fathers before me.
My Gramps died at '  Pearl on a day in December,"
Then he sighed, "That's a Christmas 'Gram always remembers."
My dad stood his watch in the jungles of '  Nam ',
And now it is my turn and so, here I am.  
 I've not seen my own son in more than a while,
But my wife sends me pictures, he's sure got her smile.
Then he bent and he carefully pulled from his bag,
The red, white, and blue... an American flag.
I can live through the cold and the being alone,
Away from my family, my house and my home.    
 I can stand at my post through the rain and the sleet,
I can sleep in a foxhole with little to eat.
I can carry the weight of killing another,
Or lay down my life with my sister and brother..
Who stand at the front against any and all,
To ensure for all time that this flag will not fall."    
 " So go back inside," he said, "harbor no fright,
Your family is waiting and I'll be all right."
"But isn't there something I can do, at the least,
"Give you money," I asked, "or prepare you a feast?
It seems all too little for all that you've done,
For being away from your wife and your son."  
 Then his eye welled a tear that held no regret,
"Just tell us you love us, and never forget.
To fight for our rights back at home while we're gone,
To stand your own watch, no matter how long.
For when we come home, either standing or dead,
To know you remember we fought and we bled.
Is payment enough, and with that we will trust,
That we mattered to you as you mattered to us."

PLEASE, would you do me the kind favor of sending this
 to as many people as you can? Christmas will be coming
 soon and some credit is due to our U.S. service men
 and women for our being able to celebrate these
festivities. Let's try in this small way to pay a tiny bit of what

 we owe. Make people stop and think of our heroes, living
 and dead, who sacrificed themselves for us.  

 LCDR Jeff Giles, SC, USN
30th Naval Construction Regiment
OIC, Logistics Cell One
Al Taqqadum, Iraq


"Real Integrity is doing the right thing, knowing that no body's going to
 know whether you did it or not."
 

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Scott Fleming successfully underwent triple heart bypass surgery

December 09, 2009

Indiana Troopers Association and the Indiana National Guard

Mr. Alder,

Thank you for your offer to forward this to the members and friends of the Indiana Troopers Association.

We can't express how much we Soldiers appreciate the support we get from the people of Indiana, and we are very excited about this program to support the youth of Indiana.

If members of the Indiana Troopers Association would like updates on the Hoosier Youth Challenge Academy, they can follow this link:

http://www.in.ng.mil/CivicPrograms/HYCA/tabid/945/Default.aspx

Again thanks and regards,

Staff Sgt. Les Newport

Indiana National Guard

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A WHOLE LOTTA DOPE

LaPorte County---Indiana State Police Trooper Anthony Potesta discovered a large amount of drugs and currency on a routine traffic stop.

At approximately 1:15 p.m., on Monday, December 7th, Trooper Potesta stopped a 2009 Chrysler mini-van west bound on the Indiana Toll Road at the 61.5 mile marker (this is near the LaPorte/Saint Joseph Counties line) for a moving violation.  After talking to the driver Potesta realized after further investigation that there was an indication of illegal activity.

Left to right Trooper Potesta, Mirza, and Laporte county deputy Andrew Morse

Mirza and the dope

LaPorte County Sheriff’s Deputy Andrew Morse and his K-9 Mirza arrived and Mirza alerted on the vehicle.  An unknown amount of what was later revealed to be marijuana was found and the van was impounded.

A search warrant was later obtained and five (5) large hockey style bags, containing 187 individual vacuumed sealed plastic bags.  It is estimated that each bag contained one (1) pound of hydroponic marijuana. A total of $16,318.00 was also located.

The driver identified as Tomasz Stanislaw Harasim, 26 is a polish national on a passport from Canada.  He was arrested and taken to LaPorte County jail and charged with Dealing in Marijuana Over Ten Pounds a Class C Felony and Possession of Marijuana Greater than Thirty Grams a Class D Felony.

December 07, 2009

Indiana State Police Motor Carrier Division Cuts 42 Jobs

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---The state has eliminated 42 inspectors from the Indiana State Police Motor Carrier Division, half the division's workforce.

The division is responsible for inspecting large trucks and school buses. The cost-cutting move was made because of the state's financial trouble, 6News' Rick Hightower reported.

"Every agency is having to take steps to shore up their budgets," said Indiana State Police 1st Sgt. Dave Bursten. "We're going to do everything in our power to reassign state police personnel to fill in where those positions have been reduced."

Forty-one motor carrier inspectors kept their jobs. The last day of work for those who were let go is Dec. 31.

The civilian force, in which employees don't carry weapons and are strictly limited to enforcement of motor carrier laws, has been decimated within the last two decades, said Larry Hood, of Logansport, who learned he will be laid off.

"The state's in tough times," Hood said. "When I first hired on, there were 160 motor carriers."

The layoffs were emotional for workers who invested many years in their jobs, such as Darlene Hauck.

"I've been here 20 years," Hauck said. "They chose 42 of us to get it and 42 to stay."

"This is not what anybody wanted to see happen," Bursten said. "There is a lot of thought and feeling for those people."

***************************

Sgt. Bob Hunt, Retired ISP Pilot - Medical Issue Update

Sunday, Dec. 6, 2009

Once again, just to let you all know, Bob is now in ICU at Memorial Hospital, 800 West 9th Street, Jasper, Indiana.

He is in room # 2224.  There is an 800 number, which is 800-852-7279.  His oxygen levels were really low & I couldn't get him to wake up this morning, when I checked on him around 11:40 or so.  It is extremely unusual for him to sleep past 10:00 at the latest but he hadn't slept much at all last night & was really snoring the first time I checked on him. 

Anyway, he was already turning blue, fingernails totally black and his lips were very purple.  I checked his B/P & it was78/49 and he was cold to the touch.  I got him awake enough to tell him I was calling an ambulance & he couldn't under-stand or talk.  No, not a stroke.  Just oxygen deprevation.  His temperature was 101 when the ambulance got here. 

They have run EKG, CT Scan, etc. and still nothing showing up. They were checking for a clot in the lungs and for fluids around the heart & lungs.  Nothing but a little rattling.  He has been getting IV antibiotics all day along with the oxygen & his temp. is back to normal now.  They do think maybe he has pneumonia & maybe the flu on top of that so they are still checking everything,   He's been very unstable for a couple of weeks now and gotten steadily worse. 

But, he was wanting me to come home to get his laptop and bring it back to him tonight, along with his Hunter & Sprite.  So, he was definitely feeling much better.  I left the hospital around 9:30 this evening & his color is almost back to normal but they are keeping him at 100 percent on the oxygen for now.  Everyone is still baffled by this illness.

I will try to keep everyone updated as I find out more. 

Glenda Hunt

***************************

Indiana State Police Traffic Stop Leads to Drug Arrest and Weapons Charge

ANDERSON, INDIANA---Indiana State Trooper Matt Wilson stopped a vehicle driven by Cortez McDonald, 18, Anderson, at approximately 12 a.m. on 120509 for a traffic violation on Harter Boulevard and 12th Street in Anderson.  Trooper Wilson noticed a strong odor of marijuana emanating from McDonald’s 1998 Dodge.

Senior Trooper Dave Preston and his K-9 partner “Colt” were called to the scene for a K-9 search.  Indiana State Police K-9 Colt indicated on the vehicle and 462 grams or 1.1 pounds of marijuana were located.  A back seat passenger, Marzell Stennis II, 18, Anderson, was found to be wanted on an outstanding warrant out of Madison County.  One handgun was found in the vehicle in addition to the 462 grams of marijuana.  McDonald and Stennis II were transported to the Madison County Jail and incarcerated there.

Arrested and Charged:

Cortez McDonald, 18, 1133 Balfour Road, Anderson

Dealing in Marijuana, Possession of Marijuana over 30, Possession of a Handgun-No Permit

Marzell Stennis, II, 18, 2733 West 12th Street, Anderson

Wanted on a Warrant-Contempt of Court

Investigated by:   

Trooper Matt Wilson

Senior Trooper Dave Preston and K-9 Colt

Source:

Sergeant Mike Burns, Indiana state police

December 06, 2009

Indiana state police arrest former sheriff for drunken driving

GREENCASTLE, INDIANA---Former Putnam County Sheriff Mark Frisbie, currently on probation after serving time in federal prison, was arrested Friday on suspicion of drunken driving, police said.

 A state trooper pulled over Frisbie's vehicle Friday night just north of Highway 231 and Veterans Memorial Highway in Greencastle after police said he crossed the center line.

Frisbie was arrested on preliminary charges of driving under the influence, which may violate the terms of his probation.

The Putnam County Sheriff's Department declined to comment on the case.

Frisbie pleaded guilty last August and resigned from his job after a federal indictment alleged that he used a sheriff's department credit card and checking account to pay expenses for his consulting firm, personal travel expenses and campaign supplies.

A state audit found that $4,400 was missing or had been misspent.

The U.S. attorney said more than $12,500 in federal money was diverted to cover expenses incurred by Frisbie's private company and some money was used to pay for supplies related to his re-election campaign.

Frisbie served two months in federal prison, and was also ordered to serve four months on home detention and two years on probation.

Frisbie bonded out of jail sometime during the weekend.

******************************

Henry County corrections director Doug Sheets

a former Indiana State Police detective suspended without pay

NEW CASTLE, INDIANA---Embattled Henry County Community Corrections Director Doug Sheets had little to say after he was suspended without pay Friday morning by the program's advisory board.

"What is there to say?" said Sheets. "The board has decided."

<<<Doug Sheets, a former Indiana State Police detective, was recently charged with ghost employment, racketeering and misconduct following a state probe into corruption within the program.

Also charged were James D. Heffernan, the program's home detention manager, and Matthew Patterson, a former field officer.

Advisory board member Josie Richey, an appointee of New Castle Mayor Jim Small, moved to suspend Sheets and take action to terminate Heffernan. Sheets' suspension is effective Dec. 11.

The board, including Henry County Circuit Judge Mary Willis, Superior 2 Judge Bob Witham, Superior 1 Judge Michael Peyton and Henry County Sheriff Butch Baker, supported both actions. They also agreed to name Darrell Jackson, a Henry County sheriff's deputy, as interim director beginning Monday.

"(Jackson) is an outstanding person," said Richey, who believed the board addressed the community's concerns over the alleged corruption.

Once Jackson takes over Monday, the board recommended he fire Heffernan. Jackson also will be asked to conduct an audit and independently investigate the alleged wrongdoing.

Sheets and Heffernan attended the meeting at the community corrections office but did not speak.

Indianapolis attorney John Tompkins, representing Heffernan and Patterson, asked the board for more time so he could gather information about the allegations. He expressed disappointment afterward that the board moved to suspend and fire the accused staff members.

<<<Heffernan and Patterson, also New Castle police officers, have already been suspended from their law enforcement duties.

Sheets is accused of altering and approving time cards of employees, allowing them to be paid more hours than they worked. He also allegedly allowed HCC employees to use vehicles and equipment belonging to the program for personal use such as attending sporting events and traveling to a gambling casinos ad golf courses.

Heffernan and Patterson also are accused of clocking in for work when they were playing golf, exercising at a gym or conducting other personal business.

All three face initial hearings Dec. 10 before Hancock Superior Court 1 Judge Terry Snow.

December 05, 2009

ITA CALL CENTER & CPORATE OFFICE

“BUSINESS AS USUAL”

            Many of you have read or heard the various media reports in our area newspapers and on our local radio/TV stations.   We would like you to know that the ITA is open and is conducting business as usual.   Our ongoing fund raising program continues as do our various programs. 

We have filed Chapter 11 Reorganization Bankruptcy.   We continue to provide the same benefits and programs as we have for the past 30 years.  

            We continue to meet our two major goals:  “Supporting those who serve with pride and lending a helping hand to those in need”. 

If you have any questions, please contact the Indiana Troopers Association Corporate Office at 800-671-9851 – Monday through Friday between the hours of 9-5.

Thank you for your understanding and continued support.

****************************

Indiana Troopers Association files bankruptcy

ANGOLA, INDIANA---The Indiana Troopers Association has filed for bankruptcy protection as the fraternal organization continues legal battles with telemarketing companies it hired for fundraising work.

The Angola-based troopers group supports a variety of police-related causes, such as a death benefit for officers killed in the line of duty, college scholarships and money to help troopers and their families in emergencies.

The group in February sued two Atlanta-based companies, claiming it had been defrauded of hundreds of thousands of dollars over the past few years.

Campaign Resources Inc. and JAK Productions countersued, saying they had not been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for work performed and that they had been defamed.

ITA filed for bankruptcy Nov. 20 in the northern district of Indiana.

Karen Shelton, ITA director of operations, said the move was made “to do the right thing and keep supporting our officers.”

At the corporate headquarters at 117 W. Maumee St., Angola, Shelton said it’s “business as usual.”

“Nothing has changed. We’re open,” she said, inviting those concerned or interested in the status of the group to call or stop into the office.

Indiana Troopers Association website is at www.trooper.org

The ITA has served troopers, conservation officers and excise police for 30 years. Shelton said the largest contingent of members is in the Fort Wayne district, which includes the northern corner of the state.

“They’re very supportive of what’s going on,” said Shelton. “They are all aware.”

A 2010 membership drive is going on now. Shelton said 2009 was a record year for membership, though she did not disclose member numbers.

Fundraising also continues for ITA activities, which include Shop With A Cop through ITA member referrals and a fifth-grade essay contest. Fundraising was curtailed for a few weeks after the bankruptcy was filed, said Shelton, but is back at “full speed.” She said the slowdown in contribution requests was more a reaction to the economy than court issues.

“We have recently brought quite a lot of business back to Steuben County, which was our goal,” Shelton added. With the ITA headquarters in Angola, payroll services and other commerce is concentrated locally for services provided by the nonprofit organization throughout the state.

“All the money comes to us and we disperse it as we need to,” said Shelton. “We do what we say we do, and we are local.”

December 04, 2009

Troopers fraternal club goes bankrupt

Angola group files amid dueling suits with its fundraiser

In the midst of a heated state lawsuit, the Indiana Troopers Association has filed for bankruptcy.

The Indiana Troopers Association, an Angola-based fraternal organization, collects money for a variety of state police-related causes such as a death benefit for officers killed in the line of duty, college scholarships and funds to help troopers in emergencies. Troopers voluntarily pay an annual fee to be members of the association, which collects money from donors around the state.

But the association has received less-than-stellar reviews from the Better Business Bureau, in part because nearly 80 percent of all the money it collects goes to pay fundraising costs, rather than to the causes it identified to supporters.

The fundraising process itself is at the heart of the lawsuit filed by the association. And bankruptcy filing in late November came the day before the group was to appear before an Allen Superior Court judge to explain why the organization should not be held in contempt of court for failing to comply with a court order.

In its bankruptcy filing, which officials said is related to the lawsuit, the association claims it has $69,178 in debts and more than $1 million in assets, according to court documents.

The defendants in the Allen Superior Court lawsuit are asking a federal judge to dismiss the bankruptcy case, claiming it was fraudulently filed to get the association out of trouble.

In February, the Indiana Troopers Association sued Campaign Resources Inc., JAK Productions and John Keller, the owner of both companies. Telemarketing companies Campaign Resources and JAK Productions were hired by the association to help handle fundraising from a West Virginia call center. The association first hired JAK Productions in 1995, according to court documents.

But according to the lawsuit, the association claims the companies defrauded it of hundreds of thousands of dollars over the past few years. Despite the association’s belief it was being defrauded, it renewed its contract with the companies in 2007.

In response, the companies countersued, claiming they had not been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for work performed and that the association defamed them by alleging racketeering and fraud in the initial lawsuit. In a later motion to dismiss, CRI further argued that a contract dispute was inflated by the association into allegations of deceptive business practices and theft, according to court documents.

According to the contract between the association and the companies, the information about residents who contributed to the association was the property of JAK Productions.

After the association hired another company to access the data, information related to phone numbers and supporters, and blocked the Campaign Resources access to that data, an Allen County judge ordered the association to reinstate access.

When the association failed to comply with Levine’s order, a contempt hearing was scheduled for Nov. 23. The bankruptcy was filed Nov. 24, causing the Allen Superior Court case to be moved to federal court.

In a motion to have the bankruptcy dismissed, the company argued the association is solvent and using the bankruptcy to move the state case to a different venue.

Allen Stout, the association’s attorney, declined to comment.

Attorneys for Campaign Resources said their position was spelled out adequately in court documents and the company looks forward to explaining its position further in court.

Ernie Alder, the association’s executive director and a retired trooper, said he could not offer much comment.

He did say that the lawsuit has curtailed fundraising activities.

December 03, 2009

Prosecutor says Camm will face 3rd trial

NEW ALBANY, INDIANA---A former Indiana state trooper will face a third trial in the shooting deaths of his wife and children.

Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson announced Thursday that he'll refile murder charges against David Camm in the Sept. 28, 2000, killings of Kimberly Camm and their children, 5-year-old Jill and 7-year-old Bradley.

Camm has been convicted twice of killing his family at their home in the southern Indiana town of Georgetown.

Both convictions were overturned on appeal.

Camm's lawyers want a judge to appoint a special prosecutor because Henderson had negotiated a deal to write a book about the case.

Henderson says the deal was canceled once the Indiana Supreme Court overturned Camm's conviction in June.

November 30, 2009

ISP Seminar Loaded With Tips For Truck Drivers

VERSAILLES, INDIANA---A free, one day seminar sponsored by members of the Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division will be giving truck drivers a jump on the competition next month.

According to a release from Indiana State Police Sgt. Noel Houze, the free commercial driver seminar will be for: Those who own or drive a truck for a small trucking company; those self-employed as a construction worker and drive a vehicle with a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating more than 26,000 pounds; those with or without a commercial driver’s license (CDL); those who operate a vehicle or a combination vehicle whose gross weight exceeds 10,000 pounds; those looking for a D.O.T. number; and those making sure they have all of the permits required to comply with state and federal regulations.

The seminar will take place from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 8 at the Indiana State Police Post at the intersection of U.S. 421 and State Road 129 in Versailles.

Although anyone can attend this training, the seminar is primarily for owners of small trucking companies, owner operators or individuals owning their own business who operate smaller trucks and trailers as part of that business. With so many state and federal requirements, many individuals with small companies and personal businesses in which trucks are used as part of the business are unknowingly operating in violation of state and federal laws, according to the release.

Only 15 people can be accommodated at this seminar so registration is required. Persons interested in attending the free seminar should call 812-656-8168 or 656-8004 on Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. to register.

November 29, 2009

Indiana State Police To Hold Their 12th Annual Project Blue Light Ceremony

Plainfield, IN. November 25, 2009: The Indiana Law Enforcement Academy located in Plainfield, Indiana will conduct its 12th Annual Project Blue Light Ceremony on Tuesday, December 1st at 7:00 p.m., on the east grounds of the Academy. The 184th and the 186th Basic Class, of the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy will be hosting this year’s program. The Academy’s Executive Director, Rusty Goodpaster says, “the fallen heroes who have made the ultimate sacrifice and their families will be honored.

The Keynote Speaker representing the Indiana Chapter of C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors)will be Brukentta Geisler, who is the surviving sister of Pulaski County Deputy Shandon Bassett E.O.W. 10/07/05. Shad died in a single vehicle accident while responding to an officer needing assistance. Brukentta is the mother of four children and is presently Co-President of Indiana C.O.P.S.

Executive Director Goodpaster reports, “after a 48 – year low, Officer deaths rose 20% in the first half of 2009.” Even though Indiana lost an officer earlier this month, Kosciusko County Officer Jeff Shaw, his name and family will be honored at next year’s Ceremony.

Executive Director Goodpaster encourages the public “to remember your blue lights this holiday season, to honor and remember those law enforcement officers, who have given their lives in service of their profession. Also, the blue lights thank those men and women, who continue to work America’s streets each and every day of the year.”

Source: Sergeant Mike Burns, Indiana State Police

***************************

Robert L. Meeks

<<<Robert L. Meeks, a retired Indiana state trooper from LaGrange, served as the Senate District 13 representative for 20 years before he retired in 2008.

Editorial writer Karen Francisco talked with the former chairman of the powerful Senate Appropriations Committee about his experiences there and what he’s been doing since he stepped down.

1 This past year was your first on the sidelines of the General Assembly. What do you miss most now that you’ve left office?

I miss everything. I miss being in the fray and the mix, the debate. I miss being on the floor of the Senate. I miss taking care of constituent problems. I miss the town meetings. I just miss the whole thing. In fact, when I sit out there, I looked through the glass, inside, rather than the inside looking out. It hurt.

2 You famously warned about budget problems years ago. What advice would you give your former colleagues now that there truly is no money?

Sen. (Luke) Kenley (R-Noblesville) is now appropriations chair. … He had a pretty good feel for what kind of financial condition the state was in. … He understands there is no money. He practiced that this last session.

3 Your successor (in District 13), Marlin Stutzman, is now seeking the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate. Did you ever consider running for statewide office?

No. I never did. When I was on the state police, I never considered going to Indianapolis for a promotion. When I came into the Senate, I didn’t consider going higher because I wanted to serve the people that I knew – the people of the area that I worked for 45 years. … I was asked – I had a Democrat friend of mine in the House of Representatives (who) said, “If you run for governor, I’ll resign my seat in the House, and I’ll be the campaign manager in the south.” I said, “No, I’m not going to do that, maybe if I was 25 years younger.” … I felt my place was there. I tried to maximize that with everybody that called.

4 How are you keeping busy now that you’ve left the legislature?

I serve on the Public Safety Academy board, which is taking a considerable amount of my time. I serve on a board of an insurance agency that’s located in Indianapolis … and I’m trying to help the people of Steuben County and get a casino up there. Not that I’m a gambler. I’m not, really, but I like 700 jobs. I mean, the average salary is $35,000; a dealer makes $50,000. Those are good jobs, and Steuben County right now doesn’t have many jobs … that’s what I’m interested in.

5 You had a 25-year career in law enforcement before you served in the Senate. What advice would you offer a young person considering public service?

My advice would be, “the water’s fine – jump in.” The only thing that I tell people when you go into public service, the only thing you have to give away is your integrity, and once you give it away, it’s gone forever. You can never get it back.

Right now, everybody has a jaundiced eye of government. They have a jaundiced eye because the people that are there don’t listen to the people they serve. They forgot who the boss is. The boss is the people that elect you. If you’re not willing to listen to them, you don’t belong in government because you are their voice.

November 27, 2009

Embattled Financier Drawn Into Police Scandal

Tim Durham Listed As Witness In Ghost Employment Case

NEW CASTLE, INDIANA---A high-profile Indianapolis businessman whose companies are the subject of an FBI investigation may also have links to accusations of ghost employment by two New Castle police officers.

Tim Durham, whose financial offices in downtown Indianapolis and Akron, Ohio, were raided Tuesday, is listed as a state witness in the case.

<<<TIM DURHAM

Lt. James Heffernan, 39 and Patrolman Matthew Patterson, 38, along with Henry County Community Correction Director Doug Sheets, 57, were arrested last week on preliminarily charges of ghost employment, corrupt business influence and official misconduct.

Heffernan and Patterson worked part time for Henry County Community Corrections, with Heffernan serving as the assistant director of the facility. Both were hired by Sheets, a retired state police detective.

Investigators said the three men golfed at a nearby country club, gambled at Hoosier Park in Anderson, went to sporting events and visited friends, all while clocked in at their corrections jobs.

John Tompkins, who is representing Durham, is also representing Heffernan and Patterson in their case.

He said Durham is connected to the New Castle case because off-duty officers often worked at his home.

"Mr. Durham has events at his home where he hires private security. Frequently, private security is off-duty police officers," Tompkins said.

<<<HEFFERNAN & PATTERSON

But Tompkins could not explain why Patterson was seen in possession of a Hummer SUV registered in Durham's name.

Court documents in the case against Patterson also indicate that the officer's GPS system showed that he was at

Durham's sprawling mansion on Geist Reservoir while he claimed on his time sheet that he was checking on people on house arrest.

Sources within Henry County Community Corrections told Sanchez that the agency did not have anyone on house arrest that day with the 30,000-square-foot home.

<<<SHEETS

Both Heffernan and Patterson have been placed on unpaid administrative leave.

The board overseeing the Henry County Community Correction facility will meet Wednesday behind closed

doors before making any public statements on the official status of the men accused of ghost employment, official misconduct and corrupt business influence.

November 23, 2009

Telephone number changes for Terre Haute Post

Lieutenant Mike Eslinger, Commander of the Terre Haute District, would like to inform the public of recent changes to the telephone numbers for the post. Until recently, the Indiana State Police post at Terre Haute could be contacted at local numbers 812-299-1151, 299-1152 and 299-1153, along with the  toll free number 1-800-742-0717.

Effective immediately, the Terre Haute post can be contacted at either (812) 299-1151 or toll free at 1-800-742-0717.

The 812 -299-1152 and 812-299-1153 numbers are no longer in service.

***************************

Indiana State Police Seymour Post Recognized for Traffic Safety Efforts

CARMEL, INDIANA---The Indiana State Police, Seymour Post, was honored at the 15th Annual Operation Pull Over Awards Banquet, held in Carmel, Indiana.  The event pays tribute to state and local law enforcement agencies who participate in year round efforts to improve traffic safety and save lives on Indiana roadways.

“As a result of this collaborative effort involving the Indiana State Police Seymour Post, Bartholomew, Jackson and Jennings Counties are making significant strides in the realms of traffic safety enforcement and overall, fewer motorists are being killed in traffic crashes as a result,” said Lieutenant Mark Davis.  

Efforts conducted through Operation Pull Over rely on a dual strategy involving high visibility enforcement and heightened public awareness aimed at promoting seat belt use and preventing crashes, injuries and fatalities that occur due to impaired and dangerous driving behaviors.

Operation Pull Over is structured in four quarterly campaigns and is funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).  Each campaign consists of two weeks of public awareness using television, radio and outdoor advertising and two weeks of increased enforcement.

At this year banquet the award in recognition of outstanding performance in Operation Pullover was given to the Indiana State Police Seymour Post, District 43.

November 22, 2009

Teen Fought With Trooper, Reached For Gun

14-Year-Old Boy Arrested After Chase

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---An Indiana state trooper fired shots at a vehicle driven by a 14-year-old boy after he reached for a gun during a traffic stop.

<<<Senior Trooper Ronald Lowe pulled over the boy in the construction zone on Interstate 465 near the Rockville Road ramp just before 11:30 a.m. on suspicion of speeding, said Sgt. Dave Bursten.

Lowe said that the boy was acting suspicious, and reaching under his seat. When the trooper saw the butt of a gun, he had the boy step out of the car and tried to handcuff him, but the boy struggled, pushing Lowe to the ground, Bursten said.

When the boy got back into the car and reached under his seat again, Lowe fired several shots, striking the car and a back tire, Bursten said.

The boy drove off, but lost control of the car on Rockville Road and ran, police said. He was apprehended by officers in a nearby apartment complex, Bursten said.

A semiautomatic pistol was found under the driver's seat of the car the boy was driving.

The boy was arrested and preliminarily charged with battery on a police officer, resisting law enforcement with a vehicle, resisting a police officer and possession of a handgun without a permit.

"Our trooper suffered some minor injuries in the course of the scuffle with the suspect, but this could of ended much more tragically than it did," Bursten said.

Lowe is a 15-year veteran of Indiana State Police.

November 20, 2009

State Police make drug bust worth $700K

ROCHESTER, INDIANA---A six week long investigation resulted in one arrest after police found a grow operation inside a Rochester home with 704 marijuana plants inside, equaling a street value of about $700,000.

The investigation brought police to search two homes owned by 44-year-old Daniel R. Nells Wednesday.

According to Indiana State Police, the first residence searched was at 10525 East 50 North in rural Knox, Ind., where officers found handguns, an undetermined amount of cash, marijuana under 30 grams and drug paraphernalia.

It was at Nells other home, at 4250 South 225 West in rural Rochester where police found an active indoor marijuana grow operation which had 704 marijuana plants. Police estimate the growing equipment alone cost nearly $10,000. Police say the home appeared to be unoccupied and used only to grow marijuana. Nells was living in a camper on the property.

Nells faces a class D felony for Possession of Marijuana over 30 grams, Dealing Marijuana over 30 grams and Maintaining a Common Nuisance. Nells is also charged with a misdemeanor for Possessing Drug Paraphernaila in Fulton County.

Police say a report will be filed with the Starke County Prosecutor's office requesting that charges be filed for the items found at the Knox, Ind. home.

November 19, 2009

Two New Castle police officers and a retired Indiana state trooper arrested

NEW CASTLE, INDIANA---Two New Castle police officers and a retired Indiana state trooper who is the director of the Henry County Community Corrections program were arrested Wednesday after being accused of racketeering, ghost employment and other crimes.

The arrests -- of officers Jim Heffernan, 39, and Matthew Patterson, 38, and HCCC director Doug Sheets, 57 -- followed a state police investigation of the community corrections program launched in May at the request of the Henry County Board of Commissioners.

Heffernan, a city police lieutenant with 15 years of experience, and Patterson, a patrolman and 12-year police veteran, hold part-time positions with HCCC, which monitors the activities of convicted criminals who have been placed on home detention.

The HCCC program has been overseen for several years by Doug Sheets, a retired Indiana State Police detective.

All three men surrendered to authorities at the Henry County jail on Wednesday afternoon and were released after posting $1,000 bonds.

Sheets, of Centerville, is charged with one count of corrupt business influence, a Class C felony carrying a standard four-year prison term, and two counts each of official misconduct and ghost employment, all Class D felonies with standard 18-month sentences.

Heffernan, HCCC home detention manager, and Patterson, a field officer for the community corrections program, are both charged with corrupt business influence, official misconduct and three counts of ghost employment.

Contacted Wednesday night, New Castle Police Chief James Nicholson said both officers had been suspended without pay pending resolution of the criminal allegations.

"As police officers, we are held to higher standards," Nicholson said. "We have zero tolerance for criminal activity."

Nicholson noted all allegations against Heffernan and Patterson stemmed from their duties for HCCC, not their work as city police officers.

A special prosecutor -- Julie Pottenger of Hamilton County -- has been appointed to the case because Henry County Prosecutor Kit Crane serves on the HCCC advisory board, along with the county's three judges.

Details of the events leading to the allegations were not available late Thursday.

An audit of HCCC's operations for 2008, issued by the State Board of Accounts last month, noted discrepancies between hours listed on the program's time cards and those submitted to the commissioners for payment.

"(HCCC officials) did not provide evidence nor could we determine the reason for those differences," auditors wrote.

After county commissioners last spring requested the probe by state police and the State Board of Accounts, Sheets apparently placed on leave some New Castle police officers who had been working on a part-time basis for HCCC.

However, Heffernan and Patterson reportedly were not among the HCCC employees placed on leave by Sheets.

November 17, 2009

Trooper Joel Flores Completes 33 Mile Run to Honor Local Children

On Sunday, November 15, Joel Flores, Crawfordsville, completed his run to honor two local children who have fought difficult battles with childhood cancer.  These children were affected with childhood cancers at an early age, and are children of local law enforcement officers.  Flores, a seven-year veteran with the Indiana State Police, ran the 33-mile distance between the Crawfordsville Police Department and the Indiana State Police Post in Lafayette in five hours and forty-four minutes with the support of fellow law enforcement colleagues from the Crawfordsville Police Department, the Tippecanoe County Sherriff’s Department and the Indiana State Police.

Flores ran to raise support and money on behalf of two law enforcement families: Sean Swaim, a State Trooper, whose 5 year old daughter, Reagan, was diagnosed with medulloblastoma, a brain tumor and Jack Taylor, a Crawfordsville City Policeman, whose family who lost their 13 year old son, JD Taylor, to cancer on October 2, 2009.  Reagan is currently beginning 56 weeks off chemotherapy and radiation. 

Flores began his route at 7:00 am on Sunday and reached the Indiana State Police Post in Lafayette around 12:45 p.m.  Flores appreciates the community support and outreach that he has experienced preparing for this run and encourages supporters to continue to donate to this cause now that the run has been completed successfully.

All donations are tax deductible.  Please make checks payable to the Indiana Trooper’s Association Youth Fund and indicate “Trooper Runs 33” Fund in the memo section.  Donations and pledges will be divided evenly between the two families.

Indiana Trooper’s Association Youth Fund

PO Box 798
Angola, IN 46703

Karen,

The run went very well.  I finished the run in 5:44:28, well under my anticipated time of 6 hours.  I was able to have at least one person with me at all times.  Runners that ran portions with me are: from the ISP Lafayette post; Sgt. Randy Gritten, Trp. Ryan Winters, Trp. Phil McBride, Trp. Brock Russell, Trp. Andrew Smith, F/Sgt. Brian Olehy, and Trp Sean Swaim (Reagan's father).  Runners from Tippecanoe county sheriffs department and runners from the Crawfordsville Police Department.  I also had family and friends run portions as well. 

Thank you for your help.

Joel Flores

November 15, 2009

Indiana State Police Holiday Enforcement Blitz Underway

EVANSVILLE, INDIANA---Thanksgiving is less than two weeks away and Indiana State Police are already increasing patrols as travelers hit the road. Troopers say they hope "The Safe Family Travel Enforcement Blitz" will help reduce the number of traffic fatalities and injuries as the holiday travel season approaches.

<<<Sergeant Trevor Helmer with the Indiana State Police says the primary focus will be on dangerous and impaired drivers and seatbelt violations.

"Basically we have more troopers on the road," Helmer said. "And they'll be enforcing targeted issues like alcohol related driving and failure to comply with seatbelts."

And these targeted issues are based on the numbers from last year's Thanksgiving holiday period.

Sergeant Helmer says 15 people died on Indiana roadways last year - 66 percent of those were alcohol related and two thirds of the victims were not wearing seatbelts. Troopers say they're not only looking for impaired drivers but also aggressive ones too.

"Speeding, excessive speeding, following too close, unsafe illegal lane changes, disregarding automatic signals; all these things lead to traffic causation factors and can lead to fatal crashes," Helmer said.

According to Helmer these efforts are federally funded through grant money which allows for these extra troopers to be posted on the roadways. It's a statewide group effort with over 250 agencies involved.

Helmer says along with increased enforcement and saturation patrols drivers should be aware of sobriety checkpoints at anytime.

This Thanksgiving holiday blitz lasts all the way through Thanksgiving weekend.

November 14, 2009

Indiana State Trooper Joel Flores planning a 33-mile run to benefit cancer patients

CRAWFORDSVILLE, INDIANA---An Indiana State Trooper is lacing up his running shoes for a good cause this weekend.

 <<<Indiana State Trooper Joel Flores knows what it's like to go the distance and he knows the pain that comes with running a marathon of 26.2 miles.

"It takes some kind of mental toughness to get through it," says Trooper Flores.

Flores should know, he's done it in three different marathons.

"Your mind plays tricks on you. It tells you that you're falling apart. It tells you that you're hungry. That you're tired, or that you've run enough, stop already," Flores says.

But Flores won't be listening to that voice this Sunday when he runs his longest race yet of 33 miles.

"There is going to be definitely a lot of time to think," says Flores.

Trooper Flores will be thinking about two people he has never even met and one of them he won't ever get the chance to meet.

J.D. Taylor, the 13-year-old son of a Crawfordsville police officer, passed away last month from cancer. The other, 5-year-old Reagan, is the daughter of a fellow state trooper who just began her fight against cancer.

"She's going to be going through 56 weeks of chemo and radiation therapy," said Flores.

He says his run has already garnered plenty of attention.

"A lot of people have come up to me and said, 'Are you the trooper running 33 miles?' and I'll tell them 'Yeah,' and they'll ask me 'Are you crazy?'," Flores explained.

Flores will run north on US 231 from Crawfordsville all the way to Lafayette. He says that's an easy course compared to the uphill marathon kids face fighting cancer.

"The pain that I'll feel or any discomfort that I'll have will not compare to what these kids have been going through," said Flores.

"They don't get to rest. They don't get to relax," he added.

But Flores will get to rest when Sunday's race is over and his two-year-old son Miguel and wife Charity, who's expecting their second baby, will be with him. Flores says he can't help feeling blessed even though he lost his own mother to colon cancer two years ago.

"I saw what cancer did to her," he said.

That's why even when Sunday's race is wearing him down, the thoughts of two kids will keep him running.

"I can go the extra mile or I can take that extra step and that's what's going to be pushing me," said Flores.

Half the donations and pledges raised will go to St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis in memory of J.D. Taylor. The other half will go to Reagan's family to help with her medical expenses.

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Man killed in police-action shooting in Henry County

DUBLIN, INDIANA---Police shot and killed a man in southeastern Henry County late Friday after he led authorities on a 30-minute vehicle chase, then left his car and opened fire on authorities with a handgun.

The man, whose name was not available early Saturday, was pronounced dead at the scene of the shooting, along U.S. 40 near Bentonville Road, just west of the Wayne County town of Dublin.

According to Sgt. John Bowling, public information officer for the Indiana State Police post in Connersville, the chase began about 9:50 p.m. Friday when a state trooper tried to stop a car for a traffic violation in northwestern Fayette County.

The chase continued, at speeds ranging from 30 mph to 60 mph, down several county roads, with the driver at times displaying a handgun to his pursuers.

About 10:20 p.m., the man, by now in Henry County, made a U-turn on U.S. 40 east of Bentonville Road, then pulled into the median and stopped. By this time a second state trooper, two Henry County sheriff's deputies and a Cambridge City police officer were also involved in the pursuit, Bowling said.

The man then left his car, again displayed his handgun and "fired in the direction of the officers," drawing the return fire that would end his life, the ISP press release said. No other injuries were reported.

U.S. 40 was closed to traffic near the shooting scene early Saturday at the investigation continued.

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The Trooper Patrick Flag Fund was established to

honor the supreme sacrifice of Indiana State Trooper Scott Patrick.

Trooper Patrick was killed in the line of duty on December 22, 2003. Trooper Patrick was dispatched on a common motorist assist run. This time the individual in need was a criminal intent on doing harm. Following a short struggle, Trooper Patrick was shot once above his bulletproof vest. He was able to return fire and radio for assistance, he died shortly after. Trooper Patrick and his wife were expecting their first child. Six months after Scott's death his son was born. Isaac Scott Patrick bears the initials ISP in honor of his father's love and dedication to the Indiana State Police.

Like many law enforcement officers, Scott had a great appreciation and love for the American flag. For Scott, the flag was much more than a cotton banner to be displayed on holidays. Scott viewed the waving stars and stripes as a symbol of what our country stands for. Scott chose a career in law enforcement to do his part to protect the freedoms symbolized by the flag. The Trooper Patrick Flag Fund is a living legacy to the sacrifice that Scott made in service to the State of Indiana.

After Scott's death our family looked for a way to honor his sacrifice.

Scott held dear in his heart what the flag represented and revered those who have fought abroad and at home to ensure its survival. Scott insisted on always displaying an American flag in his commission.

We chose to honor Scott's selfless sacrifice by honoring the commitment and sacrifice of other law enforcement officers in Indiana. After Scott's death, many people came together to provide a final tribute to a hero. During the months and years following Scott's death we learned more about the people who organized the tribute, and what they contributed. As the years passed we realized there was a gap that needed to be filled. When a veteran passes away one of the ways they are honored for their service is by an internment flag, also known as a burial flag. No such program exists for law enforcement officers. We decided it was time to change that. The Trooper Patrick Flag Fund provides burial flags for all law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty in Indiana, burial flags for retired Indiana State Troopers, and ceremonial flags for events that honor fallen law enforcement officers in Indiana.

The mission of the Trooper Patrick Flag Fund is to:

Honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Trooper Patrick by honoring all fallen Indiana law enforcement officers, as well as recognize the service of retired Indiana State Troopers, while showing appreciation and gratitude to the American flag and what it represents.

Your contributions to the Trooper Patrick Flag Fund are tax deductible through the Indiana State Police Alliance (please note on the memo line your donation is for the Trooper Patrick Flag Fund). Your generous donation in any amount to the Trooper Patrick Flag Fund is greatly appreciated, and goes directly toward honoring an Indiana law enforcement officer. If each ISP Trooper could donate $5.00, the program will be well funded and able to provide a flag to honor an Indiana Law Enforcement Brother. A donation of $95.00 will provide an internment flag to honor a fallen Indiana law enforcement officer.

The Trooper Patrick Flag Fund website is in development and should be live soon. www.TrooperPatrickFlagFund.com

November 13, 2009

Former Covington School District Superintendent Arrested by the Indiana State Police

COVINGTON, IN – On Friday, November 13, 2009 officers from the Indiana State Police arrested Nathan E. Evans, former Superintendent of the Covington Community School Corporation on seventeen criminal counts. 

The arrest follows a lengthy investigation by the Indiana State Police and the Indiana State Board of Accounts that started in February of 2009. 

The investigation began as a result of a routine audit by the State Board of Accounts when discrepancies in school accounts were found.   

The completed investigation was turned over to the Fountain County Prosecutor’s Office for review. 

As a result of the investigation, seventeen counts were filed in the Fountain County Circuit Court. 

The charges included two counts of Forgery; a class C Felony, fourteen counts of Theft; a class D Felony, and one count of Perjury; a class D Felony.   

Investigating officer, Detective Tom Minnicus, of the Lafayette Post said, “Investigations like this take a long time to complete because of their complexity and the large amount of documents to reconcile and review. 

In the end, the time is worth it to protect the public funds and hopefully prevent this sort of event for happening again.” 

Nathan Evans was incarcerated in the Fountain County Jail following his arrest. 

He was released when bond was posted. 

An initial court appearance is set for December 15, 2009 in the Fountain Circuit Court in Covington.  

November 12, 2009

State Police Investigation Uncovers Indoor Grow

St. Joseph County – Early Tuesday morning, November 10, members of the Indiana State Police Marijuana Eradication Team served a search warrant at 51209 South 25th Street, in South Bend. Troopers conducting the investigation on the occupant of the residence secured a search warrant based on information they gathered over several weeks.

Troopers from the Bremen Post recovered approximately 90 live plants, drug paraphernalia, cash, and grow equipment at the home.  A line of ventilating fans placed along the basement stairs guided officers to the plants located in two basement rooms.  The marijuana was growing in five gallon buckets as an automated high intensity light moved along a track above them.  The marijuana plants were found in all stages of growth and each mature plant can have a street value of $1,500.

Dawn Dubin, 49, of South Bend was home when the warrant was served.  Dubin was arrested on several felony charges and taken to the St. Joseph County Jail where she is being held on bond.

Eradication Team Leader, Trooper Brian Hoffman, would like to remind the public to continue to report suspicious activity to the Indiana State Police Marijuana Eradication Tip Line at 888-873-1694.  “The tip line continues to be a valuable asset in the fight against indoor and outdoor marijuana growing operations,” Hoffman added.

Arrested & Charges:   Dawn Dubin, 49, 51209 S. 25th St., South Bend, Indiana

1.   Cultivating marijuana

2.      Maintaining a common nuisance

3.      Possession of drug paraphernalia

4.      Possession of controlled substance

5.      Dealing marijuana

6.      Possession of hashish oil

November 08, 2009

Book and release will cut costs

BY ROY DOMINGUEZ

GARY, INDIANA---As a former Indiana state trooper, deputy prosecutor and as Lake County sheriff, I have spent my career championing public safety and security.

I am grateful I have had the opportunity to oversee a jail that is a professionally run facility, needed to incarcerate those who commit violent acts against others or who pose a danger to society.

I believe we need to continue measures that reduce the cost of operating one of Indiana's largest jail facilities, without sacrificing public safety.

The recently announced book and release program is an opportunity to reduce the operating cost of the jail, as well as to avoid the significant cost of expanding the jail facility. The program also recognizes that these are individuals who have not been convicted of a crime, but instead have been charged with nonviolent disobedience of law. Those charged will still have to appear in court to answer the charges. The book and release proposal is supported by members of the judiciary, the County Jail Oversight Committee and the Lake County Prosecutor's Office.

The present practice of incarcerating those charged with allegedly perpetrating a nonviolent offense is an unnecessary financial burden on county taxpayers. In fact, the county spends more than $1 million annually holding those who have been charged with committing offenses such as conversion, shoplifting, check deception or traffic-related incidences.

When a person is incarcerated, we must provide him or her with housing and meals. Case in point is the young pregnant mother or the elderly person who is a nonviolent offender. By law, we must provide free medical treatment to those who are incarcerated. All of these costs are assumed by the taxpayer -- costs that continue to rise. Let me be clear, those who are arrested and charged with violent crimes will go to jail and suffer the full consequences for their actions.

Unfortunately, due to hard economic times, criminal activity is on the rise, and an increased jail population also generates a significant potential financial burden on the county when it can least afford another major expense.

The county jail is already at capacity, and if we do not take measures to reduce inmate population, Lake County could face new construction costs to expand the facility in the very near future. In fact, the cost of such an expansion is estimated at more than $60 million.

Upon a judge's order, the use of electronic GPS monitoring devises will keep offenders of a nonviolent crimes at home. This will reduce the cost of jail operations and result in improved efficiency. It may also keep those individuals from being indoctrinated into more serious criminal activity by keeping them out of jail and away from those who should be in jail and kept at bay from society.

The proposed book and release program allows the county to process those who are charged with nonviolent actions, and incarcerating those who pose a danger to others. The book and release program is working well in other jurisdictions. Failing to fully implement this innovative approach -- which is a decision of the county's judiciary -- will burden county taxpayers with unnecessary cost.

Background info on Roy Dominguez, Sheriff of Lake County Indiana

Roy Dominguez started his initial employment at Inland Steel where he worked as an apprentice millwright in Local 1010.

In 1976, Roy enrolled at the Indiana State Police Academy. A year later Roy Dominguez graduated first in his class and won the prestigious Donald Flint Award for outstanding cadet.

As an Indiana State Trooper he attended night classes at Indiana University Northwest and earned a BA in sociology. Dominguez enrolled in Valparaiso University School of Law.

Once Dominguez received the law degree he joined the Lake County prosecutor's office in 1982 and was named Deputy Director of the Child Support program. He cracked down on dead-beat parents and increased child support collections 300%, from $3 million to $9 million.

In 1989 Governor Evan Bayh appointed Roy as chairman of the state Workers' Compensation Board. Under Roy's leadership, the Worker's Compensation Board was modernized and outdated workers' comp. laws were overhauled for the first time in 62 years.

Roy has served as legal council to many municipalities and boards.

On January 1, 2003 Dominguez assumed the Office of Lake County Sheriff.

October 31, 2009

A look at today's Indiana State Police Commission

as seen on http://www.madisoncamerunning.com/

Trooper Dave McKalip's Commission

Gettin' Down To Business

Under The Hood

Dave's Operating Area

McKalip being inpsected by Lt. McKinney at Seymour Post

October 29, 2009

South Bend rapist posing as Indiana state police officer arrested

SOUTH BEND, INDIANA---A suspect in a South Bend rape that's set the community on edge is in the St. Joseph County Jail this morning, following an arrest Wednesday night after he was pulled over by police.

<<<The suspect, 24-year-old Anthony Frick, of Granger, was driving along Capital Avenue about 8:30 p.m. when St. Joseph County's domestic violence incident team asked for assistance with the traffic stop.

Frick was taken into custody without incident, according to Sgt. Bill Redman of the St. Joseph County Police.

He faces preliminary charges that include rape, sexual deviant conduct, burglary and robbery, Redman said.

Police think this is the man who posed as an Indiana State Police officer early Tuesday, and told a 67-year-old woman living near Indiana University South Bend that he needed to speak with her about something going on in the neighborhood.

When she opened the door, the man forced his way in and raped her, police said. He was not dressed as a police officer.

The man threatened to kill the woman if she called police, police said.

October 28, 2009

Indianapolis District Holds Annual Inspection

Lt. Clint Bundy inspecting Trooper Adam Buell's handgun

Lt. Clint Bundy inspecting Adam Buell

F/Sgt Smithers inspecting equipment

The Indiana State Police Post held its annual inspection of personnel and equipment today at the Indianapolis Post. Commanders inspected the appearance, commission and equipment of 70 officers ranging in rank from trooper to lieutenant. The inspections are held once every year at all 18 state police districts.

During the inspection, each officer is personally inspected for proper grooming and uniform appearance. The officer’s firearms are then examined for cleanliness and serviceability. The police commission is next and inspected for cleanliness both inside and out, as well as the trunk. Finally, all equipment issued to the officer is accounted for and inspected. Those items include such things as clothing, shoes, radar, computer, camera, baton, mace and any other miscellaneous equipment issued to the officer.

At the conclusion of the individual unit’s inspection, the inspecting commander gave the officer a rating of unsatisfactory, marginal, satisfactory, superior or outstanding. Troopers who received an unsatisfactory rating will have to complete the process again at another district until he or she passes.

The Indiana State Police Department has a rich history in providing the best law enforcement service possible to the citizens of Indiana. In doing this, the department holds the individual officer responsible for the utmost cleanliness and care of all issued equipment.

******************************

South Bend rapist posed as an Indiana state police officer

SOUTH BEND, INDIANA---A 67-year-old woman was raped in her home by a man posing as an Indiana state police officer early Tuesday, police said.

Police are still searching for the attacker, who they said could be a serial rapist.

The man went to the woman’s home, near Indiana University South Bend, around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday.

The man told the woman he was a state police officer when she asked who he was through the door.

“He told her there was something going on in the neighborhood and that he needed to speak to her,” said Sgt. Anne Schellinger of South Bend police.

When she opened the door, the man forced his way in and raped her, police said. He was not dressed as a police officer.

The man threatened to kill the woman if she called police, police said.

She was not seriously injured, but she could not provide a description of the rapist, police said.

“He had one thing in mind when he came to her house — to rape this woman,” Schellinger said. The attacker did not steal anything from the residence, police said.

October 26, 2009

From David Lloyd, ITA Board Member regarding Brian Buroker's health issues

Just thought I would let you know that I went back to the Oncologist today and we feel like we finally got some good news.  The path reports were sent to Mayo Clinic, the report was received back this morning and disagreed with the Marion Pathologist finding, in that, the cancer was in a Lymph Node.  Last week we were told that the cancer was in the Mesentery lining..  Today with the new info, the Oncologist stated that this changed the urgency, all of my test from the CT and Blood test came back negative for any cancer.  Great News.  Power of prayer,  although I know God knows the final outcome of what I’m going through, I have had so many people that has told me that they and their churches are praying for me, The good news we found out today, should make all believe.  Brian

*******************************

State swears in 24 new conservation officers

INDIANAPOLIS---The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has 24 new conservation officers in its Law Enforcement Division.

The officers were sworn in at a Statehouse ceremony on Friday and will work in locations around the state.

The DNR has 214 conservation officers, who enforce state laws and get involved in activities such as outdoor education programs. The DNR also has specialty response units such as river rescue, cave rescue, underwater search and recovery and K-9 teams.

October 23, 2009

Brian Buroker health issues

Gentlemen,

Lt. Tackett advised me that retired ISP detective, Brian Buroker, has some serious issues with cancer.  I spoke with Brian’s supervisor, Tom Rubesha, who confirmed it.  Brian’s address is 4730 S./700W., Swayzee IN.  46986.  I am sure he would appreciate hearing from his ISP brothers and sisters.  Also, in the future if you hear of someone in distress please let me know.

Thank you, Bob Rich

October 22, 2009

Putnamville District Holds Annual Inspection

The Indiana State Police Post held its annual inspection of personnel and equipment today at the Putnamville Post. Commanders inspected the appearance, commission and equipment of forty six officers ranging in rank from trooper to lieutenant. The inspections are held once every year at all 18 state police districts.

Senior Trooper Gary Warfield being inspected by Sergeant Cory Robinson

Sergeant Dave Cox inspecting sidearm of Trooper Kurt Steinkamp

Sergeant Dave Cox inspecting sidearm of Trooper Kurt Steinkamp

Over view of the inspection line

During the inspection, each officer is personally inspected for proper grooming and uniform appearance. The officer’s firearms are then examined for cleanliness and serviceability. The police commission is next and inspected for cleanliness both inside and out, as well as the trunk. Finally, all equipment issued to the officer is accounted for and inspected. Those items include such things as clothing, shoes, radar, computer, camera, baton, mace and any other miscellaneous equipment issued to the officer.

At the conclusion of the individual unit’s inspection, the inspecting commander gave the officer a rating of unsatisfactory, marginal, satisfactory, superior or outstanding. Troopers who received an unsatisfactory rating will have to complete the process again at another district until he or she passes.

The Indiana State Police Department has a rich history in providing the best law enforcement service possible to the citizens of Indiana. In doing this, the department holds the individual officer responsible for the utmost cleanliness and care of all issued equipment.

“The results of this inspection are a direct result of the pride and dedication that is instilled into each trooper, starting at recruit school”, commented Lieutenant Dan Jones, Commander of the Putnamville District.

***********************************

Bloomington Trooper Chris Griggs PE 7798 newborn baby information

The Grigg’s are proud parents of a new baby girl named Falon. She was born October 20th at 8:37pm at the IU medical center in Indianapolis. She is 19” and weighs 4lb, 14oz and was 3-4 weeks early. Baby and parents are doing well and they should be going home today. Please call and congratulate Chris and Nichol.

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Indiana’s Abandoned Vehicle Law

The Indiana State Police remind motorists of Indiana’s abandoned vehicle law which changed July 1, 2009. When troopers locate an unattended motor vehicle on interstates, U.S. highways, state highways, county roads or city streets the trooper will place an orange tag on the unoccupied vehicle. The tag contains the license plate number of the vehicle, the date and time the tag was placed on the vehicle. The trooper will also notify the affected state police district of the vehicle description and road the vehicle was abandoned on. That information will be documented by the district.

Many times a vehicle may be abandoned or left unattended because of mechanical problems. During hunting season, troopers see an increase of unattended vehicles parked on the public road right-of-way. The trooper can only assume the vehicle is abandoned and follows the procedures as previously stated. In all cases, the trooper checks the vehicle for occupants, particularly in the winter.

Hunters should park their vehicle on private property, with the property owner’s permission. The law requires that abandoned vehicles located on public roads be removed within 24 hours, and 48 hours on private property without the consent of the property owner. Additionally, if a vehicle is located on a roadway in such a manner that constitutes a hazard or obstruction to the movement of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on a public right-of-way, the vehicle will be removed immediately. There are other situations that a vehicle will be removed such as, expired or no registration plates, or the vehicle is reported stolen and abandoned.

If the vehicle is not removed, the law requires a law enforcement officer to have the vehicle towed. This will be at the vehicle owner’s expense. The following are the Indiana laws that apply to abandoned vehicles:

IC 9-13-2-1
Abandoned vehicle
    
Sec. 1. "Abandoned vehicle" means the following:
        (1) A vehicle located on public property illegally.
        (2) A vehicle left on public property without being moved for twenty-four (24) hours.
        (3) A vehicle located on public property in such a manner as to constitute a hazard or obstruction to the movement of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on a public right-of-way.
        (4) A vehicle that has remained on private property without the consent of the owner or person in control of that property for more than forty-eight (48) hours.
        (5) A vehicle from which the engine, transmission, or differential has been removed or that is otherwise partially dismantled or inoperable and left on public property.
        (6) A vehicle that has been removed by a towing service or public agency upon request of an officer enforcing a statute or an ordinance other than this chapter if the impounded vehicle is not claimed or redeemed by the owner or the owner's agent within twenty (20) days after the vehicle's removal.
        (7) A vehicle that is at least three (3) model years old, is mechanically inoperable, and is left on private property continuously in a location visible from public property for more than twenty (20) days. For purposes of this subdivision, a vehicle covered by a tarpaulin or other plastic, vinyl, rubber, cloth, or textile covering is considered to be visible.

IC 9-21-16-3
Removal of vehicle from traveled portion of highway
    
Sec. 3. Whenever a police officer finds a vehicle standing upon a highway in violation of this chapter, the officer may require the person driving the vehicle or other person in charge of the vehicle to move the vehicle to a position off the paved, improved, or main traveled part of the highway. If:
        (1) a person directed by an officer fails or refuses to move the vehicle; or
        (2) the vehicle is unattended;
the officer may provide for the removal of the vehicle to the nearest available garage or other place of safety.

October 20, 2009

Indiana state police probationary trooper arrested in Michigan

Elton D. Jones

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA---The Indiana State Police were notified Monday that Probationary Officer Elton D. Jones, 28 of Valparaiso, IN was arrested in the Lansing, Michigan area for allegedly being involved in criminal activity.

Based on this preliminary information P.O. Jones was placed on administrative leave without pay pending further developments in the active investigation of the Lansing, Michigan Police Department.

Earlier Tuesday afternoon the Indiana State Police was notified the following charges were filed against Elton Jones: (All Charges Filed in the State of Michigan)

1. Armed Robbery (If Convicted, Sentence Term is Life or Any Term of Years)

2. Home Invasion, First Degree (If Convicted, Sentence Term is 20 years)

3. Weapons – Felony Firearm (If Convicted, Sentence Term is Two Years Served Consecutive to any other Sentence

As a result of these charges Elton Jones was provided notice of termination of employment from the Indiana State Police.

Elton Jones was appointed to the state police on August 21, 2008. Prior to his termination he was assigned to patrol duties at State Police District 21 in northern Indiana.

The Indiana State Police does not comment on the investigations of other police agencies. Inquiries about the investigation should be directed to the Lansing, Michigan Police Department.

Please direct inquiries about the content of this release to F/Sgt. Bursten.

*************************

Sgt. Bob Hunt, Retired ISP Pilot - Medical Issue Update

Our praises to the Almighty above.  Bob received a call from Dr. Rosario this evening with the news that there is no signs of cancer & no tumors, so far.  I'm glad he answered the phone himself so that he could hear the words first & be relieved.        

There is a lot of inflammation from previous issues.  Don't know what that is yet but he said, "We will be going further.  We are going to take things one step at a time until we get some answers."  

For right now that is all we have, but it definitely boosted our spirits, a whole lot.  Thank you all for your concern & prayers.  This is probably far from over but it's enough for now.  If we get more news, rest assured you will all be informed as soon as we are able to absorb the news, whatever it may be, good or bad.

THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR THOUGHTS & PRAYERS.  I'M POSITIVE THESE HELPED.

Glenda

October 19, 2009

Howard County Deputies Nab Burglary Suspects

Jeremiah L. Dunn, 21, and Jessica Lynn Ward, 23, both of Tipton, along with Brant Michael Barker 27

KOKOMO, INDIANA---Quick work by an off duty Howard County Sheriff Deputy led to the arrest of three burglary suspects early Sunday evening. 

Jeremiah L. Dunn, 21, and Jessica Lynn Ward, 23, both of Tipton, along with Brant Michael Barker 27, of Anderson each face a class B felony charge of residential burglary. 

Barker also faces a class D felony charge of resisting law enforcement with a vehicle. 

The trio is accused of breaking into the David Kelly residence in the 5400 block of W. CR 100 North, shortly before 5:00 p.m.  Howard County Sheriff Dispatchers received a cellular 911 call from an alert citizen reporting that he witnessed a possible burglary in progress at the Kelly home, and that he was following a dark colored Dodge van from the scene. 

“The citizen observed two male suspects removing a television set and other items from the home.  He followed the van from the crime scene, and contacted 911 on his cell phone,” said Sheriff Marty Talbert. 

“The suspects recognized that they were being followed and attempted to elude the citizen,” Talbert added.  Howard County Sheriff Dispatchers broadcast suspect vehicle information to surrounding law enforcement agencies. 

“We had three off duty Sheriff Deputies and two off duty Indiana State Troopers who immediately responded to the northwest side of Howard County to help on duty officers search for the van,” said Talbert.  Off duty Deputy Mike Miller observed the van traveling eastbound on Smith Road at Davis Road.  The van initially refused to stop for Deputy Miller, but later pulled onto the shoulder.  Deputies conducted a felony stop, and discovered a flat panel television set, lap top computer, along with documents and mail taken from the Kelly’s home. 

Deputies responding to the residence discovered the front door kicked in, and drawers ransacked.  All three suspects were transported to the Howard County Jail where they were questioned by Sheriff’s detectives.  The van was impounded and towed to the Howard County Jail for processing.  “This is a great example of the value of allowing officers to use their police cars when off duty,” said Talbert. 

The Kelly family was not home when the burglary occurred but officers discovered rubber gloves and a roll of duct tape inside the van.  The burglary case remains under investigation by the Howard County Sheriff Department’s Criminal Investigation Division.  Anyone with information is asked to contact Lt. Greg Hargrove at (765) 456-2031. 

October 18, 2009

Southeast Christian throws festival to honor local heroes

“The best time to get this in their head is when they’re little,”

said state trooper Kevin Fisher.

JEFFERSONVILLE, INDIANA---Firefighters, police officers and military heroes serve their communities daily, and their work has not gone unnoticed.

Saturday they were honored by the Southeast Christian Church Indiana Campus during its inaugural Community Heroes Day celebration.

The event was geared towards children, according to Jarrett Samuels, children’s minister for the church. Kids were able to sit atop fire trucks, talk with cops and peer inside military vehicles that lined the Southeast Christian parking lot off Charlestown-New Albany Pike in Jeffersonville.

“We wrestled with ideas of what we could do to say thanks,” Samuels said. “This is great for kids to stop by and see [the heroes] and see what they do, see them in a positive light.”

Tom Sellmer Sr. recalled how inspirational talking to then Jeffersonville Assistant Fire Chief Buttons Bennett when he was a kid. He still remembers the antique fire trucks he explored with his friends at a now defunct Jeffersonville fire house and how it played a role in shaping his life.

Since 1961, Sellmer has been a firefighter, as he currently serves as a volunteer for the Clarksville Fire Department. Many in his family including his son have followed in his footsteps locally.

“It gets in your blood,” he said of the career. “A little kid will come up to us, want to get in the fire truck, and that’s where it starts.”

And there were plenty of eager children fascinated by the engines on display courtesy of the Clarksville and Jeffersonville fire departments.

“Every opportunity we get, we try to do these events,” Sellmer said.

Indiana state police troopers took the opportunity to educate children about the need to follow off road vehicle laws and wear seatbelts.

“The best time to get this in their head is when they’re little,” said state trooper Kevin Fisher.

Though the American Red Cross had a booth setup to take blood donations, and police were on hand to discuss safety, Heroes Day seemed to be more about family and fun.

Kids tumbled down slides and laughed as they jumped and played inside inflatable playgrounds. Free hot dogs and popcorn were served and the foyer of the church was open for families to step inside and escape the chill of the unseasonably cool October wind.

The famous Chic-fil-A cow walked between the tables and posed for pictures with little tots as their parents grinned. Not quite 2-years-old, little Conner Hixenbaugh-Yonts wasn’t sure what to make of a cow that walked on two feet and encouraged people to eat more chicken.

At first he looked like he might cry when his mother, Angela Yonts, squeezed him in close to the cow for a snapshot. But then the toddler cracked a smile.

His mother said Conner had been smiling most of the day, as the family came from Louisville to enjoy the event.

“He really liked painting the pumpkin, though he tried to eat some of the paint,” she said.

Heroes Day was not just for Southeast Christian membership, and Samuels said church leadership would love to hold a similar festival next year.

“The turnout has been great,” he said. “It’s been a great way to reach out to families.”

October 17, 2009

Judge Pyle vows ‘respect, reliability, results’

ANDERSON, INDIANA---Hundreds witnessed history Friday as Rudolph R. Pyle III took the oath as Madison County’s first African-American judge.

After he was sworn in as Madison Circuit Court judge by Gov. Mitch Daniels, Pyle, 39, thanked God and his parents while fighting back tears.

“You say you’re not going to do that,” he said, wiping his eyes as he joined the county’s other robed judges. An overflow crowd packed into commissioners’ court, spilling into the lobby outside.

“I am keenly aware that this is not my seat. I don’t own it, you do,” Pyle said. “I’m willing to serve as long as you’ll have me.”

Daniels, who selected fellow Republican Pyle to replace former Judge Fredrick R. Spencer, noted the historic nature of his choice but also said his choice was clear.

“The man we are about to swear in to this office has multiple qualifications,” Daniels said, noting Pyle’s experience as a deputy prosecutor, state trooper and law clerk at the Indiana Court of Appeals.

“Yes, this is historic; yes, something unprecedented is happening,” Daniels said. “That has nothing to do with this choice. ... We have the best person.

“Indiana expects him to not merely be a competent judge, but to be a great judge,” he said.

Daniels said the selection of a new judge is among the toughest decisions a governor must make. “There’s no place for cronyism,” he said.

But Daniels did acknowledge at least one shared interest. A known motorcycle enthusiast, the governor paused while listing Pyle’s heady achievements.

“Motorcycle instructor,” he said to gales of laughter.

Pyle pledged to focus on 3 Rs from the bench — respect, reliability and results. He led those gathered to chant the mantra and said they were qualities that the county was accustomed to from its judges.

“They have been providing that level of service,” he said.

Pyle acknowledged difficulties facing county residents, including foreclosures and unemployment, but he said there were positive things happening locally, including in the courts.

“With all the stresses that go on,” he said, “there’s still a sense of excitement when you look at what’s happening in the judiciary. ... In the past two weeks, you could sense it walking around the courthouse.”

 

He noted a recent federal stimulus grant of nearly $1 million that will help the courts consolidate and expand problem-solving courts. Drug court, mental-health court and re-entry court are meant to provide alternatives to nonviolent offenders who may benefit more from treatment and social-service intervention than from incarceration.

Pyle also noted that his appointment and Daniels’ previous selection of David Happe to fill a vacancy in Superior Court 4 placed on the bench two judges under age 40.

After he was sworn in, Pyle was greeted by lines of well-wishers who streamed into Circuit Court.

“We’re very, very, very proud of him, but I’m not surprised,” said Jean Morehead, a family friend who was the director of multicultural affairs at Anderson University when Pyle was an undergraduate student there.

Morehead noted that Pyle had been the first African-American student government president. “I’m not surprised by his success today.”

U.S. Rep. Mike Pence, R-Anderson, called Pyle “A man of integrity, a man of character and a man of accomplishment.

“It’s also a historic milestone,” he said. “It’s a cause for celebration in Madison County and all over Indiana.”

A history-making judge

Rudolph “Rudy” R. Pyle III is the first African-American judge in Madison County. Here’s a look at the new judge of Madison Circuit Court:

Age: 39.

Family: Son, Seth, 1.

Political affiliation: Republican.

Education: Bachelor’s degree from Anderson University. Law degree from Indiana University. Master’s degree from the College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, Va.

Professional: Deputy Madison County prosecutor since 2004; in private practice in 2006. Indiana State Trooper for nearly four years. Served as law clerk for Indiana Court of Appeals. Adjunct professor at AU.

October 16, 2009

Tom Acton wonders about a S&W semi-auto that shoots wad cutters

I am seeking information from back in the day when we carried S&W's, with the exception of Bob Conley, when we went to a shoot at Putnammville some of the guys were using a Smith semi automatic that would fire wad cutters.

Does anyone remember what that model was?  I'm interested in finding one.

Thanks, Tom Acton

October 15, 2009

Concerns of Police Survivors

Spooky Scamper Family Fun Walk

Indiana Concerns of Police Survivors is holding a fundraiser in the Indianapolis area.  They say this will be fun for the family.

The Spooky Scamper Family Fun Walk will be on Saturday October 31st, 2009. 

Click on the link to the ICOPS home page to learn more about this event.

http://www.indianacops.org/

October 14, 2009

RANDY SPEIDELL BENEFIT

GLENBROOK MALL - FT. WAYNE

CHICK-FIL-A 

            As most of you know, our ITA Administrative Assistant Deb Deuter-Speidell and her husband, Randy and daughter, Madeline were in a serious auto accident in January of this year.   Randy was critically injured and is still recovering from his injuries.   As you can imagine, his medical bills are extremely high and he is unable to work.   Chick-Fil-A of Glenbrook Mall has offered to donate 10% of their sales  to Randy to assist with his medical expenses.  Here are the details:

                        WHAT:        RANDY SPEIDELL BENEFIT

                        WHEN:        THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22ND

                        TIME:            5-8PM

                        WHERE:       CHICK-FIL-A - GLENBROOK MALL

        Please share this information with everyone you know and go out and have dinner at Chick-Fil-A on October 22nd.

****************************

Indiana State Police News Release

Bicknell City Judge and his Wife Arrested for Theft Knox County

BICKNELL, INDIANA---Wednesday morning Indiana State Police arrested Bicknell City Judge Andrew Moreland, 45, and his wife, Cindy Moreland, 38, after an investigation revealed they allegedly stole money from the Bicknell City Court.

<<<Andrew and Cindy Moreland were arrested after they turned themselves in at the Knox County Jail.

They were later released after posting bond.  

An investigator with the Indiana State Board of Accounts conducted an audit after receiving information that money was missing from the court’s account.

Indiana State Police discovered nearly $21,000 worth of traffic ticket fines and other fees were allegedly stolen from the court’s account during 2008 and 2009.

October 11, 2009

Should these men have been allowed to carry a gun?

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---One Indiana man pressed the barrel of a loaded handgun into the chest of a woman holding her 1-year-old son.

Another's handgun was confiscated by police three times -- twice for shooting in public. A third man was arrested for allegedly dealing crack cocaine and later was accused of beating his girlfriend.

But it's not merely those actions that concern law enforcement officials and others on both sides of the polarizing handgun debate. It's what happened next.

In each of these three cases, the person later applied for a permit to carry a handgun in public. And in all of these cases -- and hundreds of other questionable ones uncovered by The Indianapolis Star -- the Indiana State Police granted that request, often over the objections of the local police department and even though, in some cases, it appears the State Police had a legal obligation to deny the permit.

Even worse, many of those people committed subsequent crimes, some with the guns they were legally permitted to carry.

One such person held his wife captive for four days in their home, threatening to shoot her and four children. Another man pressed a gun barrel to the head of his live-in girlfriend, threatening to kill her and leaving "a very noticeable round circle mark." A third man reached toward his gun and threatened to kill police during a domestic-dispute call.

Over the past few months, The Star has examined the gun-permit process, focusing on about 450 permit holders with dubious backgrounds from Marion and Lake counties. Those counties were chosen because they are large ones where records are most accessible electronically.

In broad terms, The Star found a system that breaks down in numerous ways, enabling people with troubled and often violent pasts to legally keep a loaded gun in their waistbands and on their passenger seats.

More specifically, The Star's investigation found:

State law says a person must be of "good character and reputation" to obtain a permit, but the State Police have not denied a request based on that legal requirement since at least the 1980s.

State law says a person should be denied a permit if there is a "reasonable belief that the person has a propensity for violence." However, State Police often are unaware of extensive police and court records involving violent behavior.

State and federal laws prohibit felons from carrying handguns, but State Police grant permits to those convicted of felonies that are treated as misdemeanors under alternative-sentencing plans.

There is a disconnect between state and local police on who is responsible for thoroughly investigating applicants, which results in the State Police often failing to receive pertinent information.

The Star sought comment from Gov. Mitch Daniels but was referred to the State Police.

"I don't think I would characterize it as flawed," said State Police Maj. Doug Shelton, commander of the records division that oversees the permitting process. "Are there things we can improve on? Sure. Absolutely.

"And I think you've found a few of those examples."

The agency is looking into revoking the permits in some of the troubling cases identified by The Star, and State Police Superintendent Paul Whitesell acknowledged a need for better communication with local police.

But he, too, generally defended the process.

In permit process,

few are denied

In Indiana, a permit is not necessary to have a firearm at one's home or place of business.

But if a person wants to take a handgun out in public, he or she must apply for a "carry permit." The application is reviewed by local law enforcement, which makes a recommendation to the State Police. The state agency ultimately grants or denies permits.

There are about 300,000 active permits in Indiana. In 2008, State Police decided on 77,429 applications, including renewals. Of those, 1,278 were denied (about 1.6 percent).

No one has illusions that permit denials will keep guns out of the hands of criminals. Permits are intended, however, to provide some restrictions on who can carry handguns in public -- based on past behavior and other factors that could pose a danger to others -- while also allowing law-abiding citizens to exercise their constitutional right to bear arms.

Groups as divergent as the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and the National Rifle Association favor "behavioral" restrictions on gun possession.

"The one thing the NRA has always fought for is that every criminal who abuses a firearm, who uses a gun to commit a crime, has gun charges filed," said Andrew Arulanandam, spokesman for the NRA's national office. "They should not be plea bargained or dropped."

Indiana has three basic requirements for getting a permit.

The person must be of "good character and reputation," be a "proper person" and, generally, be a U.S. citizen.

"Proper person" was narrowly defined in state law in 1983. It contains 10 disqualifiers, including drug and alcohol abuse -- both of which are specifically defined -- and a conviction showing "an inability to safely handle a handgun."

But what is not defined -- and what seems to give State Police the most leeway to issue denials in the interest of safety -- is the "good character and reputation" clause, which dates to the 1930s.

"They didn't put that in there for nonsense," State Police attorney Jerome Ezell said. "But, boy, who defines that?"

Nobody, it turns out.

And because it's not defined, State Police admit to instead using the definition of "proper person" to address questions about character and reputation.

"Although the (character and reputation) standard is vague, the legislature deemed it important enough to make it a prerequisite for receiving a license," said Indiana University law Professor Ryan Scott. "The statute not only permits but compels the superintendent to evaluate character and reputation."

Simply ignoring the requirement, Scott said, "would run afoul of the statute."

Leslie Duvall, a former state senator who co-wrote the 1983 gun law that defined "proper person" but left "good character and reputation" undefined, said legislators intended to leave State Police with discretion in evaluating people for carry permits, and "they should be using it."

But Shelton, the State Police commander, said, "I really had never given it thought . . . because we rely on that 'proper person' definition."

But doing so means some people with extensive criminal histories -- who have been flagged by local police -- get gun permits. People such as Tony Thomas.

"At some point . . .

enough is enough"

Tony Thomas had five misdemeanor convictions, including battery and resisting law enforcement, before receiving his permit in 2006.

Indianapolis police recommended disapproval based on false statements on his application. But State Police allowed Thomas to resubmit the form because his criminal record was not "on its face" a disqualifier under the "proper person" provision.

Seven months later, police said, Thomas held his wife in their house for four days, threatening to kill her and their kids. Police confiscated numerous weapons, including five loaded handguns.

Thomas, who couldn't be reached for comment, later was convicted of domestic battery. Two years after the incident, the state revoked his permit.

Such situations anger Indianapolis police officer Miguel Roa, who said he was on duty last year when his life was threatened by a gun permit holder with a dubious past.

"You can have an extensive criminal history and still have (a permit)," Roa said. "At some point you should say enough is enough."

Bill Owensby, president of the local Fraternal Order of Police, said most officers are staunch defenders of gun rights.

But, he said, "if you've got three or four or five arrests such as battery, even if they're misdemeanors, even if they're just arrests and not convictions, then yes, I think they should invoke ('good character and reputation')."

But Arulanandam, the NRA spokesman, worries about putting too much stock in a vague requirement for good character and reputation.

"Our concern would be if that stipulation is being exploited to deny people their permits," he said. "To the best of my knowledge, I don't think that has been a problem so far."

Just what is

"good character"?

But the question is valid: Without guidance, where would -- where should -- the State Police draw the line?

For example, is a person convicted of receiving stolen property or gambling or soliciting a prostitute a person of good character and reputation?

Scott, the IU law professor, said State Police could create an administrative definition of "good character and reputation." A court challenge likely would follow that could provide guidance. Another option: Lawmakers could clarify the meaning.

State Rep. Charlie Brown, D-Gary, said the recommendations of local police should weigh heavily.

"They should have some authority to say, 'I don't want to forward this application on' for whatever reason," he said. "By virtue of them being closer to the community, they know this person is not of sound character, but the State Police wouldn't know because they are so far removed."

Even the brother of one man who got a permit despite two battery convictions -- police report he twice struck women in the face -- questions the decision by State Police.

"I'd probably say no," Lawrence Oats, 59, Indianapolis, said when asked if he thought his brother, David Oats, should have a permit. "He might get mad and try to hurt somebody."

David Oats couldn't be reached for comment.

Using the "good character and reputation" requirement might be one way to get at another potential problem: Sometimes a felony conviction is not really a felony conviction, allowing the offender to get a permit to carry a gun.

William Gammon, the man accused of threatening to kill police officer Roa, had five misdemeanor convictions, including two for disorderly conduct, and in 1998 he was convicted of a felony charge of operating a vehicle while intoxicated. But that felony was reduced to a misdemeanor.

In 2006, he received a carry permit.

Last year, Gammon's girlfriend called police to report that he was drunk and banging on her door. When Roa arrived, Gammon said he had a gun in his jacket pocket -- and a "(expletive) gun permit," according to the police report. Gammon reached toward his pocket and, the report said, threatened to kill Roa and another officer.

The police report said, "I believe this to be a safety issue towards police and the public and would strongly advise to invalidate his gun permit."

Gammon, who denies threatening Roa, contested revocation of his permit in a hearing last month. He told The Star, "Every time you get in the littlest trouble -- 'Oh, he doesn't deserve to carry a gun.' " A decision is pending.

Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Chief Michael Spears said legislators should reconsider alternative misdemeanor sentencing as it relates to gun permits. Just because a felony conviction was later reduced, he said, "doesn't mean it didn't occur."

State Sen. Johnny Nugent, R-Lawrenceburg, a gun-rights advocate, disagreed:

"If a court reduced it to a misdemeanor, then it's a misdemeanor."

Applicants' records often not shared

But misdemeanor convictions can be a strong predictor of future violence. Research by Dr. Garen Wintemute, an emergency room physician and director of the Violence Policy Research Program at the University of California-Davis, found that "handgun purchasers with just one prior misdemeanor conviction -- and no convictions for offenses involving firearms or violence -- were nearly five times as likely as those with no prior criminal history to be charged with new offenses involving firearms or violence."

The Star's investigation also found examples where applicants seemed to violate another provision that would disqualify them: that they not have a "propensity for violence."

Brandon Kennedy had misdemeanor convictions for battery, criminal confinement, criminal trespass and public intoxication. Moreover, police documented two incidents in which he fired his gun in the air in public: in 2004 in a White Castle drive-through lane at 4 a.m., and a year later at the scene of another shooting.

Local police recommended against granting the permit. But State Police granted it.

The issue wasn't State Police reluctance to determine good character or that they thought Kennedy didn't have a propensity for violence. They granted the permit because, while local police knew of these incidents -- and The Star was able to discover them -- State Police never knew.

There is no comprehensive, centralized law enforcement information available to provide more than just a list of charges and dispositions on an applicant. So the details in police reports that might raise character issues or show a propensity for violence are not known to State Police unless local police provide them or the State Police dig them up.

In interviews with Indianapolis police and State Police officials, each department seemed to expect the other to initiate the exchange. And the State Police said they consider IMPD among the best agencies in the state on gun-permit issues.

Whitesell, the State Police superintendent, said his agency asks local police agencies for reports, but IMPD Deputy Chief Bryan Roach said he had never heard that request. Roach didn't know reports could be considered as part of an application.

"If you're asking if we pull up reports," Roach said, "no, we don't do that."

Indeed, said State Police spokesman Lt. Jerry Berkey, local agencies rarely forward police reports to the state.

Whitesell is aware of the disconnect. He is developing a handbook to help local police identify information State Police should use in deciding permit requests.

In the case of Kennedy, who twice fired a gun in the air in public, State Police attorney Ezell said, "That would be one we would be very interested in."

Jim Tomes, Evansville, director of the pro-gun rights 2nd Amendment Patriots, generally opposes any licensing requirements. But if they're going to exist, he said, people such as Kennedy should be excluded.

"My concern is why the Indiana State Police would allow that guy to get a handgun license," Tomes said.

Kennedy, who disputed the White Castle incident but admitted to firing his gun at the scene of the shooting, says he is responsible enough to carry a gun. Asked why, he pointed out that even the State Police seem to have confidence in him.

"The (IMPD) already told me, 'No, you shouldn't be able to get it,' " he said. "But the State Police say 'yes.' State has the final say-so."

Additional Facts

Star Watch investigation

The Star examined more than 900,000 records for this project but focused primarily on two large counties -- Marion and Lake -- where local law enforcement issue their recommendations for approval and disapproval electronically and where comprehensive criminal histories are more accessible.

We further focused on three groups of permit holders: those who appeared to have felony convictions; those in which local law enforcement had recommended their permit be denied; and those who had their permits later revoked.

But our research was limited. For example, local law enforcement only recently began issuing permit recommendations electronically -- and only in select counties.

Still, even when looking at only Marion and Lake counties -- and only for a one-year period covering parts of 2008 and 2009 -- we found 456 permit applications in which local police recommended disapproval but the Indiana State Police granted the permit.

From there, we investigated cases using court records and public access terminals to look at police reports.

Who's carrying?

Following the letter of the law

The Indiana State Police superintendent is responsible for issuing permits allowing Hoosiers to carry handguns in most places outside their homes and fixed places of work.

Indiana offers four-year and lifetime permits. It is the only state in the U.S. to offer a lifetime permit.

As of Aug. 20, there were 321,195 Hoosiers -- or about one in 14 residents 18 years or older -- with a carry permit.

Under Indiana law, the State Police superintendent must issue a permit to an applicant unless the agency can prove the person does not qualify under specific terms. Among factors that could prohibit a person from obtaining a permit are:

A conviction for resisting law enforcement within five years of application.

A conviction for a felony.

A conviction for a crime of domestic violence, unless a court has restored the person's right to possess a firearm.

A conviction for any crime involving an inability to safely handle a handgun.

Evidence that would cause a reasonable belief that a person has a propensity for violent or emotionally unstable conduct.

To obtain a permit, a person must apply to the local police department or, if they do not live in an area covered by a municipal police agency, the county sheriff. Applications also can be filed online.

The local department must verify the applicant's personal information, whether the applicant previously has held an Indiana license to carry a handgun and whether that license has ever been suspended or revoked. The department also must conduct an investigation into the applicant's official criminal history, if there is any, and forward that information with a recommendation for approval or disapproval.

State law says "the superintendent may make whatever further investigation the superintendent deems necessary" and shall issue a permit if it appears the applicant has a proper reason for carrying a handgun, is of "good character and reputation," is a proper person to be licensed and is a citizen of the United States or a noncitizen allowed to carry a firearm under federal law.

Who's carrying?

Indiana's permit holders as of Aug. 20:

Gender:

Male: 12.18% of 18-and-older population; one in every 8.21 adult males.

Female: 2.41% of 18-and-older population; one in every 41.4 adult females.

Race:

White: 7.38% of 18-and-older population; one in every 13.56 adults.

Black: 7.14% of 18-and-older population; one in every 14.01 adults.

Asian: 2.21% of 18-and-older population; one in every 45.29 adults.

Native American: 2.31% of 18-and-older population; one in every 43.29 adults.

Other: 0.2% of 18-and-older population; one in every 501.51 adults.

Sources: Indiana statutes, Indiana State Police, Star reporting

October 09, 2009

Opportunity to Order ISP Flag

If interested, please follow the ordering directions on the attachments.

Orders must be place by October 31, 2009

*************************

Sgt. Bob Hunt, Retired ISP Pilot - Medical Issue News

Ok, I know this is news to some & just an update for others.  I'm going to try to put the facts in as I remember them so bear with me on this.  I hope I'm not leaving anything out.

About 1 1/2 weeks ago, Bob started feeling really worn out, out of breath & generally not worth a darn.  We finally got in to the Dr. & they ordered x-rays & put him on an inhaler to try to expand his lungs for more air. The next day the results from the x-ray showed a mass so they ordered a CT Scan just to be sure it wasn't a cloudy film. 

The inhaler caused his throat to close up & he started having trouble swallowing & was strangling when he tried to eat anything.  Went back to the Dr. & they took him off the inhaler & he can swallow now but still can't catch his breath right.  His whole  upper body is numb or tingly to the touch but there is no pain, he says.

Anyway, the x-ray showed a large mass on his right lung.  They thought it might just be a cloudy film so then we went for the scan.  The scan on Friday showed that, indeed, there was a mass on the upper right lung.  Along with that, there were 8-10 lymph nodes enlarged, so they have decided that it may be LYMPHOMA OF THE LUNGS, which isn't the same as full lung cancer and will be easily treated since they are all fairly small.  There are 3 that are larger than the rest.  One of which is near the Tracheal Tube which may or may not be another cause for the swallowing problem.

So we go to an ONCOLOGIST in Jasper tomorrow (Thursday) for a consultation.  Then there will be a biopsy done on the larger lymph nodes or glands. This illness has nothing to do with the Prostate Cancer, since it didn't show up in the liver or bones, which is where it would show if it pertained to the Prostate.  So far his PSA is still good.  Thank God for small favors.

The Scan also showed Plural swelling, which is pleurisy, but nothing major.  Also, Emphysema cells, but this is also normal for this area & has nothing to do with smoking or any other cancers. The Ohio Valley is well known for this illness. 

I'm sorry for the mass sending of this notice but it is so much simpler than trying to call everyone to let them know individually.

If you know of anyone who would like this information, please feel free to pass it on. 

Bob & Glenda Hunt
107 N. Washington St.
Huntingburg, IN 47542
812-683-3528 Home
413-683-3521 Fax
huntiai@insightbb.com

October 07, 2009

Indiana state police inspect equipment

TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA---The Indiana State Police Post at Terre Haute held its annual inspection of personnel and equipment today at the Riley Fire House.

During the inspection, each officer was inspected for proper grooming and uniform appearance.

The officers' firearms were then examined for cleanliness and serviceability.

Also, all equipment and vehicles issued to the officers were accounted for and inspected.

ISP Sergeant Joe Watts said, "The trooper will receive a score of 1-4, with 4 being the best, and that's what the trooper's strive for is a 4 or a perfect score."

Troopers receiving an unsatisfactory rating must complete the process again until they pass.

ISP says, in recent years, no one from the Terre Haute post has failed this inspection.

October 03, 2009

Indiana state police find $250,000 in semi

RICHMOND, INDIANA---A routine truck inspection by Indiana State Police motor carrier inspectors along Interstate 70 led investigators to more than $250,000 in cash, state police said.

The tractor-trailer was searched by inspectors during a standard weighing near Richmond on Thursday, said Sgt. John Bowling.

A K-9 officer alerted on the cab of the truck, where officials found three bags containing more than $250,000 in bundles, common with drug money, police said.

The truck's driver -- Rajpl Singh, 47, of South Richmond Hill, N.Y. was arrested on a preliminary charge of false informing. He was being held Friday at the Wayne County Jail.

State police said the cash was turned over to federal authorities.

October 02, 2009

Missouri murder suspect son of fallen trooper

Prosecution files formal charges against former Logansport man

LOGANSPORT, INDIANA---The son of an Indiana State trooper killed in the line of duty by a murder suspect more than 38 years ago has been formally charged in a double homicide in Missouri.

On Wednesday, Cole County Prosecutor Mark Richardson filed six felony counts against 54-year-old David Russell Hosier in the shooting death of his former lover, 45-year-old Angela Gilpin, and her 61-year-old husband, Rodney Gilpin.

<<<David Russell Hosier, the son of the late ISP Detective Glen Hosier, is accused of using a 9mm to gun down the couple in the doorway of Angela’s apartment, located just down the hill from the murder suspect’s residence in Jefferson City.

Hosier was captured some seven hours later and more than 300 miles away after a nationwide all-points bulletin was issued by Missouri authorities for Hosier and his 2000 Pontiac.

Charges include two counts of murder, two counts of armed criminal action and single counts of burglary and unlawful possession of a firearm. If convicted, Hosier faces the death penalty or life in prison without parole.

Hosier remains in the Cherokee County Jail in Muskogee, Okla. He has “invoked his right to an attorney and refused to make a statement,” according to court records. As of Wednesday, an extradition hearing had yet to be scheduled.

Jefferson City Detective Mark Edwards said in a probable cause affidavit that police not only found numerous loaded weapons, a bulletproof vest and “documentation linking him to Gilpin,” they also reportedly discovered shell casings in Hosier’s vehicle similar to those left at the crime scene.

Court records also indicated that Angela Gilpin had been trying to break off the relationship with Hosier for about two months. Police say they located evidence on Angela that she feared being shot by Hosier.

Hosier reportedly told a neighbor the night before the killings that he intended to “eliminate the problem.”

Court records stated that Angela told her landlord that Hosier had been stalking her and that she needed to move. Hosier actually worked as a maintenance manager for the landlord, who had taken keys to the apartment complex away from Hosier in an attempt to prevent him from gaining access to Angela’s apartment.

The Jefferson City News Tribune reported Wednesday that Angela and Rodney were trying to reconcile.

This is not Hosier’s first encounter with law enforcement. In Indiana during the 1990s, he served six years of an eight-year sentence for battery. In that case, Hosier was accused of holding a woman hostage for several hours while he beat her.

In a motion to modify his sentence after the 1993 conviction, Hosier represented himself. His failed argument to reduce his prison time included the success of his counseling sessions with a behavioral clinician.

“Since the defendant has started these meetings,” his motion read, “he better understands himself and is not likely to ever commit another offense of this nature or of any other nature.”

Hosier, a Logansport High School graduate, was 16 when his father was shot to death in April 1971 by Linde Mallard, a suspect in the murder of a woman whose body had been found at Catholic Cemetery in Peru.

He was shot as he climbed the stairs of a Miami County residence in search of Mallard. She died inside the home as it burned while exchanging gunfire with police.

David Hosier attended the 2001 dedication of the West Market Street Bridge that is now named for his father.

October 01, 2009

News From Sgt. Noel Houze


A local trooper has been selected as the newest member of the Indiana State Police Emergency Response Team (ERT). Trooper Jimmy Wells of the Versailles District will begin his new assignment Thursday, October 1. Members of the ERT, more commonly referred to as SWAT, are highly trained in the use of specialized weapons and tactics and are utilized statewide for hostage situations, barricaded subjects, dignitary protection, high risk warrant services, as well as other special details requiring teamwork and tactical response.

Trooper Wells began his career with the Indiana State Police as a member of the 61st Indiana State Police Recruit Academy graduating in June, 2001. He resides in the Osgood area with his wife, Shannon and their three children.

Trooper Jimmy Wells

****************

State Police Versailles Post - Vehicle & Personal Inspection:

Trooper Nate Adams

Trooper Adams Patrol Vehicle

Grade - Outstanding!

September 30, 2009

Local Trooper Selected for Emergency Response Team

Trooper Jimmy Wells

Versailles: A local trooper has been selected as the newest member of the Indiana State Police Emergency Response Team (ERT).  Trooper Jimmy Wells of the Versailles District will begin his new assignment Thursday, October 1.  The Indiana State Police has three full-time Emergency Response Teams; north, central, and south.  Members of the ERT, more commonly referred to as SWAT, are highly trained in the use of specialized weapons and tactics and are utilized statewide for hostage situations, barricaded subjects, dignitary protection, high risk warrant services, as well as other special details requiring teamwork and tactical response.

Trooper Wells competed against eight other troopers for two positions on this elite team.  As part of the selection process, applicants had to run an obstacle course, go through a “skills” station, two different firearms proficiency phases, and two interviews; one with ERT team members and one with the ERT command staff.

Trooper Wells began his career with the Indiana State Police as a member of the 61st Indiana State Police Recruit Academy graduating in June, 2001.  Upon graduation he was assigned the Versailles District where he has served as a trooper in Ripley County most of his career.  During his career Trooper Wells has served as a member of the Tactical Intervention Platoon and served as a detective in the Gaming Enforcement Division on the Argosy Casino.

Trooper Wells is a 1995 graduate of Meade County High School in Kentucky.  He attended college at Eastern Kentucky University majoring in Criminal Justice.  He resides in the Osgood area with his wife, Shannon and their three children.

September 28, 2009

Trooper Sean Swaim Family Benefit

September 26, 2009

Dear Friends, just a note to let you know that Jerry Grant PE1593 is not well. 

He has dodged the bullet many times but, this one he can not.  The cancer has spread to the kidneys, pancreas and liver.  Time is not on our side.  I know he would appreciate hearing from all of his old cronies. 

Pritch (Larry Prichard PE1139)  he really enjoyed the visit in Lynn this Summer, we are so thankful that he did make it to that, and we were not aware how sick he was at that time.

Mick (Mick Carmin PE1053) I understand you are coming in next Tuesday, that will be great, just thought you should be fore warned about his condition. He is very weak, and has lost a great deal of weight.  As I said, time is not on our side.

We appreciate your thoughts and prayers and are very thankful for the time we have been given.   Our address here is: 55 Ln 140 B, Lk. George Fremont, IN  46737 

Jerry's cell is 765-702-6802  Our TX is 260-833-1315

A/Jo Grant

September 22, 2009

Richard Gaston Memorial Fishing Tournament

WHAT – Richard Gaston Memorial Fishing Tournament

WHEN – Saturday, September 26th, 2009.  Sign in starts at 7a.m.-Tournament starts at 8 a.m. with weigh in at 3:30 p.m.

WHERE – Sign in at Brookville Lake Mounds Recreation Area Beach off of State Road 101 just north of Brookville.

WHY – Tournament is in honor of fallen Trooper Richard Gaston who was killed in the line of duty March 3rd,1999.  Monies from the tournament go to the Richard Gaston Scholarship Fund that has to date provided $102,000 to graduating seniors at Brookville High School to continue their education.

PRIZES – Top Walleye – Crestliner Boat Valued at over $11,500.  2nd Prize - $500

                  Top Catfish – $200.00.  2nd Prize – $100.00

MEDIA NOTE – For interviews or further information you may contact Diana Koester, with Parkside Marine and More, at 1-765-647-4619, or visit the website

www.gastontournament.com

September 21, 2009

Please welcome the newest addition to the ITA Office Family

Jonah Edwin Smith

son of Dan and Anna Smith 

Born today:  September 21 at 6:26am

7lb. 6oz; 20 inches

PROUD GRANDPARENTS:   CATHY AND JOHN MCINTIRE

Everyone - including newYiayia Cathy are doing well!

****************************

FOURTH WEDNESDAY EVANSVILLE RETIREE LUNCH

SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS

You may be wondering why this lunch reminder is being sent so early.  I ask you to PLEASE understand the purpose.  I also ask you to understand why this will be an inconvenience to some, but the purpose will overshadow that problem.

We all are aware of the great difficulties that are being faced by our great friend and brother, Jon Deer.  He stated the other day that he really missed going to the retirees lunch.  Jon will be in Evansville on
Wednesday, the 23rd prior to his next treatment on Thursday the 24th.  Dave would be willing to bring Jon up for our regular lunch, but the distance would be too much for him.  Therefore, after being informed about a conversation between Dave Deer and Joe Rhodes, we decided to take the lunch to Jon.

We are asking you, for this one time, to please try to attend our regular Fourth Wednesday Lunch which will be held at C J's Pizza Place located inside Willow Bowling Center in Evansville.

We will be getting together at 12:00 Noon (Eastern Time) on September 23.  You will find Willow Bowling Center with the following directions:

We will gather again at Knepp's Restaurant on October 28.

 THANK YOU for your understanding in this change.  Again, spread the word to others.  Should you be unable to attend, keep Jon in your prayers.

AMY MISCHLER UPDATE

An additional note and request for you to keep Amy Mischler (33 year old daughter of Mike and Erma Mischler) in your prayers.  She is home recovering from the series of strokes she suffered while in Chicago.  Mike said she is making progress, but still has plenty of rehab work ahead of her.  

September 19, 2009

Indiana State Police E.R.T. Teams Participate in 2009 Indiana S.W.A.T. Challenge

Troopers of the Indiana State Police Emergency Response Team (E.R.T.) participated in the 2009 Indiana Special Weapons and Tactics (S.W.A.T.) Challenge held at the Muncie F.O.P. this week.

Sixteen S.W.A.T. teams consisting of officers from state, county, and local law enforcement agencies from Indiana and Illinois participated in the three day competition that began September 16th and concluded the 18th. The event was hosted by Sheriff George Sheridan Jr. and the Delaware County Sheriff’s Office. The S.W.A.T. team events included shooting skills, endurance, officer rescue, and the negotiation of obstacles.

The five S.W.A.T. team timed events are:

The following are the overall event finishing for the Indiana State Police E.R.T. teams that contain six troopers each:

The Indiana State Police E.R.T. North Team:  First place.

The Indiana State Police E.R.T. Central Team: Third place.

September 17, 2009

Trooper Patrick Flag Fund

**************************

SWAT officers converge on Muncie -- for training

MUNCIE, INDIANA---Patrick Etter, Indiana State Police senior trooper, the statewide SWAT competition is a chance to match up against the best emergency response and special weapons and tactics teams in the state, along with sharing time with good friends.

"It challenges you as a police officer to go beyond ordinary duty," said Etter, who serves with ISP's emergency response team.

The Delaware County sheriff's department is hosting the statewide SWAT competition this week at the local Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 87 along Butterfield Road. Sixteen teams from throughout the Hoosier state -- with a combined total of nearly 100 officers -- are competing in a number of events.

Sheriff George Sheridan Jr., who leads the county SWAT team, said officers compete in shooting and physical fitness events at the lodge's shooting range and obstacle course. Sheridan also presides over the state SWAT officers organization.

Most special weapons and tactics teams handle high-risk arrest and search warrants, hostage situations, heavily armed criminals and barricaded suspects. Muncie's SWAT team was called Monday when a Marion man barricaded himself in a garage after threatening a local family with a knife. Jeffrey Rittenhouse, 26, surrendered without incident.

"Every time we go out, we are in danger," said Cpl. Matt Jones of the Hammond Police Department's special weapons and tactics team.

Jones, a Ball State University graduate, said most of Hammond's SWAT calls were on narcotic cases and arrest warrants.

The competition, which continues through Friday, is open to the public and also has vendors selling law enforcement equipment and supplies.

September 14, 2009

Annual Pioneers Meeting Photos

Pioneers Donate $1,000 to Trooper Scott Patrick Flag Fund

Karen: Hello,

I sent you some photos from the Pioneers Annual Meeting.  Noel Houze Jr. won $119.00!  Also, there is a great photo of Melissa Patrick, and Amy and Dawn.  The Pioneers gave a $1,000 donation to the Trooper Scott Patrick Flag Fund.  Theirs is a very noble and honorable undertaking.  I hope you can use the photos in the magazine.  I also sent you a couple of photos of Daniel Barrett’s headstone.  Looking forward to seeing everyone in a couple of weeks. 

Marty Talbert

Daniel Roy Barrett head stone

A lot of familiar faces in the following photos but no names were submitted.

September 12, 2009

Additional on Terry Hedge

Confirmation on the heart attack--surgery early at 130 am this date was stent emplacement---not open heart as reported--release date in couple of days--THANKS to all for prayers and support

Terry advised his heart attack was the result of 100% blockage of the Left Anterior Descending Artery.  He is in Room 5108, 
St. Mary's Medical Center, Evansville, IN 47750 - TX  812-485-4000

A/Don Cox

September 11, 2009

Retired Sgt. Terry Hedges of Evansville post suffers heart attack

Lt. Dennis Marshall, Evansville District reports that retired Sgt. Terry Hedges suffered a heart attack and had heart surgery this  morning at St. Mary's Hospital in Evansville (switchboard tx:  812-485-4000).

As of 1155 hours this date, St. Mary's personnel reports Terry had open heart surgery and is still in recovery.

*********************************

State Police Oppose 'Liability' Of Issuing Tasers

Indiana Troopers Aren't Issued Tasers

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---Despite a recent string of violent attacks on Indiana State Police troopers, the agency said outfitting its force with Tasers would be too much of a liability.

A man scuffled with a trooper on Indianapolis' south side Monday night, while, last month, a trooper was attacked as she tried to arrest a man suspected of driving under the influence.

In May, an ISP trooper couldn't subdue a suspect until a local police officer shocked him with his department-issued Taser.

In the Midwest, only Indiana and Illinois state police departments do not issue Tasers, while those in Michigan, Ohio and Kentucky do.

ISP does provide its SWAT officers with Tasers, but not all troopers. Sgt. Dave Bursten said the device is just another weapon that could be turned against them in an altercation.

"We don't feel that that's one more piece of liability we need to bring to everybody on the department," he said.

Seven other law enforcement agencies in central Indiana provide officers with Tasers as an alternative to deadly force.

Indianapolis police Lt. Jeff Duhamell said he believes the device can help save officers' lives.

"I think they can," he said. "We find it to be a very effective tool."

The ISP is considering outfitting Capitol Police with Tasers, but even with more funding, Bursten said adding them to the belts of troopers would need further review.

September 08, 2009

Indiana Law Enforcement Memorial Service

September 06, 2009

Ceremony honors fallen trooper

State dedicates mile of U.S. 31 in memory of Daniel Barrett

EMOTIONAL MOMENT:

Sarah and Vince Barrett, left to right, look at a “Trooper Daniel Roy Barrett Memorial Highway”

sign after it was unveiled during a dedication ceremony Saturday morning at the

Fulton County Museum as several Indiana State Police officers look on.

ROCHESTER, INDIANA---For the parents of Trooper Daniel Barrett, Saturday marked a day of emotions.

Sarah and Vince Barrett along with other family members, members of the Indiana State Police, local law enforcement and state representatives, gathered for the unveiling of road signs, which dedicate one mile of U.S. 31 as the “Trooper Daniel Roy Barrett Memorial Highway.”

The dedication took place Saturday morning at the Fulton County Museum to honor the 25-year-old Logansport native, who was killed on Jan. 27, 2008, while attempting to catch a speeding vehicle on U.S. 31 in northern Fulton County. His vehicle left the roadway and struck a tree, which killed the trooper instantly.

Sarah and Vince described the day as both bittersweet and overwhelming. Sarah had been feeling butterflies from the anticipation of the event.

Overall, the couple said the dedication was special.

“It just means the world to us,” Sarah said.

Vince hopes the signs will help remind people to drive safely.

“I hope some people will take notice and slow down,” he said.

The idea for the dedication began with Fulton County dispatcher Brittney Markley.

“Daniel was a good friend of mine. We met in college,” she said. “He was the only officer in Fulton County to get killed. With him being my friend and since I’m involved with law enforcement, I thought it was the best way to show my appreciation for Daniel and all the other officers who are out on the road.”

Markley first called the family and asked if the dedication would be OK.

Sarah said she was surprised by the phone call, especially since she had never met Markley before. Since the two have talked, the family has made a new friend.

“I was flabbergasted when she called,” Sarah said.

The process for the highway dedication began in February and the resolution was signed on March 24 by State Sen. Randy Head and State Reps. Doug Gutwein and Vern Tincher.

Gutwein became involved because he felt it was important to dedicate a mile of the highway to Barrett.

“These guys are out here every day protecting you and me,” he said. “When one of them falls, it’s a big deal.”

Head told the crowd the signs were important to place because they will serve as a reminder. Anywhere from 20 to 50 years from now, he said parents can tell their children who Barrett was when they see the sign on the side of the road.

Indiana State Police Captain Edward Schroder, area commander, knew Barrett fairly well since both men were from Cass County. He said the highway marker was important not only for the family, but for the Indiana State Police as well.

“It shows the price of a sacrifice made,” he said.

September 05, 2009

Mile of US31 highway being named for trooper

ROCHESTER, INDIANA---A section of U.S. 31 in northern Indiana will be dedicated for a state trooper killed in a nearby crash last year.

Road signs reading "Trooper Daniel Barrett Memorial Mile" will be unveiled during the Saturday morning ceremony at the Fulton County Museum north of Rochester.

State police say Barrett's parents and state and local police officers are among those who will participate in the ceremony.

Authorities believe Barrett was trying to catch a speeding vehicle on Jan. 27, 2008, when his cruiser left U.S. 31 about 30 miles south of South Bend and struck a tree, killing him instantly.

The 25-year-old who grew up in Logansport had been a trooper for six months.

September 02, 2009

PIO Moves to ISP Museum

The Public Information Office previously located at GHQ moved to the Indiana State Police Museum on August 27, 2009.  Please note the telephone numbers listed below.  There is one telephone number that would have been utilized for Allyson Taber which now shows vacant.  Ms. .Taber has left our agency to attend school.

Museum 317-899-8293

Major Pettiford 317-899-8134

·         Lieutenant McElfresh 317-895-5136

·         Sergeant Ray Poole 317-895-5138

·         Michelle Trinkle 317-899-8140

·         Linda Brummett 317-895-5139

·         Vacant 317-895-5137

·         Fax 317-899-8289

In addition, Logo sales are expected to begin on 9/8/09.  Logo items will only be sold at the museum

Thanks,

Carlos Pettiford

Section Commander

Indiana State Police Museum

8500 East 21st

Indianapolis, IN 46219

Phone: 317-899-8134

********************************

Fugitive Sought for Assaulting State Trooper Turns Self In

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---Today, at approximately 5:48 p.m., a fugitive being sought for assaulting an Indiana State Trooper turned himself in to authorities.

On August 17, 2009 at 12:22 a.m. Indiana State Trooper Ginger Marshall initiated a traffic stop on a suspected drunk driver near Winchester and Xenia streets on the south side of Marion County.  Upon stopping the 2005 white Toyota a white male later positively identified by Trooper Marshall as Michael L. Kessler, 48, Columbus fled on foot east bound on Stop 11 road. 

Trooper Marshall chased Kessler on foot and tripped him and was able to get one handcuff on his right arm.  Kessler proceeded to swing around and strike Trooper Marshall in the head with a closed fist.  Trooper Marshall then maced the suspect at which time he got on top of Trooper Marshall and began to choke her and strike her again with a closed fist before he fled on foot. Trooper Marshall sustained a cut to her hand and head pain.  She was not hospitalized.

Since the incident, Indiana State Police have been in constant contact with family members and known associates of Kessler attempting to locate him.  Sergeant Ryan Harmon, a detective with the Indiana State Police whom is currently assigned to the U.S. Marshall’s Task Force, spent days working closely with Kessler’s family in hopes they would reach out to Kessler for a peaceful surrender.  On Friday, August 28, 2009, at approximately 7:00 p.m., Sergeant Harmon was contacted by Michael Kessler’s son, Brandon.  Brandon negotiated a deal with Sergeant Harmon where as Michael Kessler would voluntarily surrender himself to authorities on today’s date.  Today, at approximately 5:48 p.m. Michael Kessler turned himself in at the Marion County Arrestee Processing Center where he is currently being held without bond due to a parole violation.   

 ARRESTED AND CHARGES:

            Michael L. Kessler, 48, Columbus, IN.

1.       Parole Violation - Habitual Traffic Violator – Class C Felony

2.      Parole Violation -  Resisting Law Enforcement – Class D Felony

3.      Habitual Traffic Violator – Class C Felony

4.      Resisting Law Enforcement – Class D Felony

5.      Battery Resulting in Injury – Class D Felony

6.      Resisting Law Enforcement – Class A Misdemeanor    

Investigating Officer:  Sergeant Ryan Harmon

Assisting Agencies:  Marion County Sheriff’s Department and U.S. Marshall’s Task Force

September 01, 2009

Amy Mischler has suffered a stroke

33 year old daughter of Mike Mischler and sister to Matt Mischler

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS---Amy Mischler - 33 year old daughter of Mike Mischler and sister to Matt Mischler - has suffered a stroke.  She was participating in a Triathalon in Chicago.  After the event, she suffered this stroke.  An E.R. Doctor that was involved in the race or there for the event was close by and started treating her right away.  He stayed with her until the emergency personnel arrived and transported her to a trauma hospital about thirty minutes away.

I spoke with Mike about ten minutes ago and he advised the following:

    Early this morning things were not looking too good.

    At the present time there seems to be some improvement.

    Her right side was effected by the stroke, however she has shown a little movement in her right arm and leg.

    It may be a week before they will know more.

    The primary doctor stated that he hopes to see much improvement in 10 to 12 weeks.

The people in this event said the temperature was very cold throughout the day.  The hospital is North West Memorial in Chicago.  

PLEASE ask everyone you know to start a prayer chain for Amy.

UPDATE 09/01/2009

Mike Mischler provided the following update on his daughter's condition:

    Today they attempted to get Amy up - her right leg did not want to cooperate.

    Early attempts to have her use index finger to make contact with their index finger was not close.

    Later attempts at the index finger test was marked improvement (finger to finger) (finger to nose)

    Later in the day she was able to slightly lift her right arm and leg.

    She is breathing on her own.

    There is more feeling coming back - even in her right cheek.

They are putting her on some form of medication. 

She will remain where she is for about four (4) days so they can closely watch how the medication is working. 

After the four days, she will go to a re-hab center.

That's about all Mike was able to fill us in on at this time.

August 31, 2009

As seen on the Madison Came Running website


"Here's Why We Did What We Did"

http://www.madisoncamerunning.com/HOTJOHN4.jpg

Walter "Hot John" Eckert - Osgood Circa 1932

http://www.madisoncamerunning.com/HOTJOHN8.jpg

Major Eckert - Circa 1945

Personal note from PE248

A few weeks ago, at the Osgood Museum, I came across an early photo (probably 1932) of

(ISP Trooper) Walter Eckert astride an Indiana State Police Motorcycle.

He's the one I mention in the "PE 248 A Moment In Time" opener filling his cycle at my uncle's

Standard Gas Station pump....

Nickname in Osgood - "Hot John" - given to him by my Uncle, Henry Humphrey, who I believe took this photo.

"And So It Goes"

PE 248

August 27, 2009

Angola was great host for bicyclists

ANGOLA, INDIANA---Recently, the Indiana Troopers Association was honored to host the Indiana Cops Cycling for C.O.P.S. Team as they visited our town.

Each year, the bicycle team travels approximately 900 miles around the perimeter of our great state in memory of law enforcement officers who have given their lives in the line of duty.

During their 13 day trek, they make overnight stops at 12 cities, meeting with family members of officers who have died in the line of duty. Angola was fortunate to be one of those stops on their 2009 tour.

They loved Angola!!! Compliments from the 23 cyclists and their support team were plentiful as they visited Steuben County on July 29.

While they were escorted by area Indiana State Police officers, they were met at the Steuben County line by our Steuben County Sheriff’s Department. Thank you, Sheriff Lewis, Chief Deputy Kevin Kane and your Deputies!

As the team approached the Angola City Limits, they were met by Angola City Police Officers — some even joined in the cycle ride with the team. Thank you, Asst. Chief Stu Hamblen and your Officers!

Traffic was halted as the ride made their traditional circle around our memorial monument and headed west to their overnight destination, the new dorms at Trine University. Thank you, Dr. Earl Brooks, Mike Bock and Tammy Bowen!

A delicious group dinner was prepared by the capable staff of Sutton’s Deli and served to the team members and invited guests. Honorees for the dinner were the surviving family members of the 5 fallen law enforcement officers from our area.

They included the families of: Avilla Town Marshall William Miner, Ft. Wayne Officer Kenny Stiverson, Indiana State Police Master Trooper David Deuter, Lawrence City Officer Craig Herbert and Monroe County Deputy Sarah Haylett-Jones. All have families who live in or very close to Steuben County. Angola Mayor Dick Hickman welcomed the team and survivors with a heartfelt message prior to dinner, followed by team members reading memorials to each of the five area fallen officers.

Following dinner, many memories, tears and hugs were shared with all who attended. As team members gathered for a group photograph with the survivors, they chose the beautiful Soldier’s Monument in the circle as a backdrop — a perfect fit — a memorial to soldiers and a memorial for law enforcement officers. All gave their lives for our freedom and safety. Many complimented the beautiful flowers and the perfectly manicured monument circle area. Thank you Angola Garden Club and City of Angola!

As the group departed for rest at Trine, several decided to enjoy the beautiful summer evening and took a leisurely walk around the downtown area to West Maumee, meandering through the beautiful Trine Campus.

The team rode into town at 6 a.m. on Thursday morning and was treated to a bountiful continental breakfast at Sutton’s Deli. A few cyclists needed minor repairs or replacement parts for their bikes and special thanks goes to Bob Crankshaw for opening his cycle shop early to accommodate their needs. At 7a.m , the team, escorted by city, county and state officers departed our town and county to continue their memorial ride.

We cannot fail to mention the excellent media coverage that we received both prior to, during, and after the team visited our town. The Herald Republican and WLKI were great to work with and helped to share the team’s story with their audiences.

Thank you to everyone who joined the ITA team and helped us show Steuben County hospitality at its best to the team and surviving families. You made us very proud to call Angola and Steuben County our “corporate home.”

God bless you all!

August 23, 2009

Charity ride honors fallen officers on anniversary of deaths

PLAINFIELD, INDIANA---Two men killed during a bike ride honoring fallen officers were remembered across the state Saturday.

Indiana State Police Lt. Gary Dudley and retired Lake County Sheriff's Department Chief of Police Gary Martin were killed on August 22, 2006 while cycling in a memorial ride themselves for fallen officers.

"I miss him with every breath and will always love him," said Dudley's widow, Carolyn.

For the first time, she was holding "Gary's Ride" on the date of her husband's death.

Master Trooper Rich Crawford says Dudley and Martin were cycling right behind him when they were killed.

"All of a sudden, we heard this horrific crash and I looked behind me to see what was going on.

Then I saw all these events unfold in front of me and it was just horrible. Just horrible," Crawford said.

"A much larger truck ran into our support truck and just catapulted it into the cyclists.

Gary and Gary were at the back of the pack that day."

August 22 is also Crawford's birthday.

"That was the last thing Gary Dudley ever said to me on August 22, 2006, is he wished me a happy birthday and minutes later, he was dead.

"It's just so ironic that these two guys, that time of day, just happened to be in the back when this tragedy happened. Just for two guys to be out there supporting officers that have been killed in the line of duty and now, all of a sudden, we're honoring them," said Crawford.

"Cycling was his passion. That's why I thought it would be a perfect fit for what he would have wanted," Carolyn Dudley said.

Gary Dudley wasn't just a participant in the ride, he actually started it in 2003 to raise money for families of fallen officers. This year, six children of fallen officers received college scholarships thanks to Gary's Ride.

"That was Gary's dream and so we just continue doing that every year," said Crawford.

August 22, 2009

The Indiana State Police,

along with the Knights of Columbus

and the Lakeland Youth Center of Syracuse

donate backpacks, school supplies to youth

Courtesy THE GOSHEN NEWS

SYRACUSE, INDIANA---The Indiana State Police, along with the Knights of Columbus and the Lakeland Youth Center of Syracuse, came together to organize and donate school supplies and backpacks for Kosciusko County youth.

The supplies and backpacks were given to children in need that attend the Bowen Center in Enchanted Hills in northeastern Kosciusko County.

The supplies included glue, scissors, crayons, folders, paper, markers, erasers, pencils, and rulers.

According to Indiana State Police Trooper Kyle Dukes, “This is a great example of a community that is working together, to help support the youth and families of Kosciusko County.”

The children who attend the Bowen Center were “extremely surprised and grateful for the end-of- summer gift,” state police reported.

Indiana State Police officials said they would like to thank the Knights of Columbus, Lakeland Youth Center and the Bowen Center of Enchanted Hills for their dedication to the youth and their continued community support.

August 21, 2009

Victim identified in fatal shooting near Lakeville

LAKEVILLE, INDIANA---We now know the name of the man found shot to death behind a home near Lakeville.

Police say 28-year-old Arden Balmer Jr. shot 30-year-old David Lawton six times, including once in the head.

Police got a call around noon Wednesday for a suicidal person.

When officers arrived, they found Balmer with a gun, a girl with injuries on her face and neck and Lawton dead in the back yard.

The woman told police she was in a relationship with Balmer, but broke it off last Friday.

She said Balmer believed Lawton had been seeing her.

Wednesday she received a call from Balmer asking her to come to his home. She arrived and saw Lawton there as well.

Balmer took them both to the back yard, where he accused Lawton of "taking her away from me" and then shot him, according to the woman.

He then grabbed the woman and took her into the home where he used to gun to hold her against her will. When he became distracted, she ran out of the house to an arriving officer.

Balmer was then involved in a 2.5-hour standoff with police before being shot in the shoulder by an officer.

The prosecutor's office has now filed formal charges against Balmer for murder and confinement.

August 19, 2009

75th Anniversary Model Commission Available NOW!!!

 75th Anniversary Model Commission Available NOW!!!

Just arrived at the ITA Corporate Office a die-cast replica of the 75th Anniversary Commission.

The model is a 1:64 scale model 2008 Ford commission.

It is available for purchase for $12.00 that includes shipping/handling. 

August 18, 2009

1965 ITA Flagship - Model Commission - Available NOW!!!

1965 ITA Flagship - Model Commission - Available NOW!!!

    Just arrived at the ITA Corporate Office a die-cast replica of the ITA Flagship 65 Ford.

The model is a 1:64 scale model features a hood that opens to allow view of engine. 

65 Ford model commission is available for purchase now for $12.00 that includes shipping/handling. 

Get yours NOW!

********************************

TROOPER’S PATROL CAR STRUCK WHILE ASSISTING MOTORIST

An Indiana State Police trooper escaped injury at 8:14 a.m. yesterday morning, when his patrol car was struck by another vehicle while assisting a motorist in Delaware County.

Trooper Mike Dennison who is assigned to the Operations Support Division, was assisting a motorist who’s vehicle stopped running eastbound on S.R. 28 east of C.R. 400 W. Dennison parked his fully marked Indiana State Police car behind the disabled vehicle with emergency red and blue lights activated, when an eastbound 2001 Dodge Caravan driven by Robert C. Etheridge, age 84, 10121 W. C.R. 525 N. Gaston, Indiana side-swiped the police cruiser.

Dennison was on passenger side of the disabled vehicle speaking to the driver when the crash occurred, and was not injured. The disabled vehicle was not struck. Etheridge was not injured, but was cited for failure to yield to a stationary emergency vehicle.

The Indiana State Police reminds drivers that Indiana law requires motorists to approach cautiously when an emergency vehicle is stopped on two or four lane roadways with emergency lights flashing.

Motorists MUST change lanes away from the emergency vehicle if they can do it SAFELY, if not they must SLOW DOWN and proceed with caution. We are asking motorists NOT TO STOP in the roadway, this may cause a chain reaction rear end collision with other vehicles, but SLOW DOWN and/or MOVE OVER.

Indiana emergency vehicles include:

·        Police vehicles

·        Ambulances

·        Fire trucks and rescue equipment

·        Highway incident-response vehicles

·        Highway work vehicles

·        Vehicle recovery equipment (tow trucks)

The intent of this law is to protect the emergency and highway personnel who serve the public. Please be alert when you see emergency lights flashing and give them room to do their job safely. Violating the law can result in a fine and your license will be suspended up to two years if you cause damage to emergency equipment, injury or death to an emergency worker.

August 17, 2009

ISP trooper hurt while chasing suspect

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---An Indiana state trooper is injured after chasing a suspect on foot.

Around 12:30 Monday morning, Trooper Ginger Marshall pulled over a suspected drunk driver near Winchester and Xenia streets on the south side of Marion County. 

That's when police say 48-year-old Michael Kessler of Columbus ran from the scene.

Authorities say Trooper Marshall chased Kessler, tripped him and was able to get a handcuff on his right arm. 

Kessler then swung around and hit Trooper Marshall in the head. 

Trooper Marshall used Mace on the suspect, at which time he got on top of her and tried to choke her before he ran again.

The trooper was cut on her hand.  She is being checked out at the hospital.

Kessler is still on the loose.

August 16, 2009

Indiana Governor Rides To Madison With Motorcycle Group

Governor Mitch Daniels Visits Madison's Riverfront

Wearing Indiana State Police T-Shirt

PE248 with ISP ID card in pocket

and Star 1 in the uniform of the day

Sgt. Jon Watson & Indiana State Police Cycles

"Looks Like Sturgis, South Dakota"

Courtesy Madison Came Running

August 14, 2009

State Trooper and his K-9 Partner Struck by Drunk Driver

Indiana State Trooper Kyle Freeman

K-9 partner “Dudley” no photo submitted

Indianapolis – On today’s date, at 2:30 a.m., Indiana State Trooper Kyle Freeman of the Indianapolis Post and his K-9 partner “Dudley” were struck by a drunk driver.  Trooper Freeman was sitting in his Indiana State Police car at a previous crash on Interstate 70 east bound at Emerson.  Freeman had his K-9 partner “ Dudley” in the rear seat when they were rear ended.

Zenith Harding, 40, Indianapolis, was east bound on Interstate 70 when he swerved toward the median and struck Trooper Freeman’s patrol car that was in the left lane of Interstate 70 at a previous crash site.  As the investigation of the crash continued it was determined that Harding was driving while intoxicated and he was arrested.   

Trooper Freeman was treated at the scene and released.  K-9 “Dudley” will be taken to a veterinarian today for a check out.  Harding was taken to the Marion County Jail where he was incarcerated.

Arrested and Charged:

Zenith Harding, 40, Indianapolis

Charged with Driving While Intoxicated, Public Intoxication, Driving While Suspended

*****************************

Gaming investigator accused of theft

Knorr accused of spending confiscated fake money

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---A former Indiana state trooper and gaming investigator is in trouble with the law.

Troy Knorr, 46, is being charged with theft, misconduct and forgery. The Switzerland County probable cause affidavit said that, while working as a state gaming investigator, Knorr took confiscated counterfeit money and used it for himself.

"He was at Wolfe Theatres in Greensburg, Indiana and an employee or someone at the theater saw him trying to pass a twenty dollar bill. They were a little suspicious of the activity and contacted the local police," said Indiana State Police Spokesman Sgt. Noel House Thursday.

Police said Knorr spent the money in places like Wal-Mart and Lowes in Columbus. Charges date back to December 2007 after Knorr retired as a state trooper. They say he also worked at Columbus East High School as a public safety teacher. Administrators said he resigned from that position earlier this week.

Knorr faces nine felony counts in all.

24-Hour News 8 called and visited Knorr's home, but got no response. He was a 20-plus year veteran of the state police department.

"It's kind of dumb founding, how just one little mistake like this can ruin your life and a man that had a career with the state of Indiana and by all appearances was doing very well, doing fine and made a bad decision," said Sgt. Noel House of the Indiana State Police.

24-Hour News 8 was told Knorr bonded out, but has a pre-trial conference set for October 19.

August 13, 2009

Putnam County Prosecutors Office supports the ISP

Lt. Dan Jones (left) Sgt. Cory Robinson (center) Putnam County Prosecutor Tim Bookwalter (right)

Putnam County Prosecutor Tim Bookwalter recently made a donation to the Indiana State Police Putnamville Post to support the post's firearms training program. Three times a year, the post must transport its equipment to the firing range for training. However, the post's old trailer had grown antiquated. "It wasn't meeting our needs. Tim found his way to purchase a new trailer," said Sgt. Cory Robinson, district firearms instructor and Putnam County squad sergeant Bookwalter's donation from the county's asset forfeiture fund made it possible for the post to purchase a new trailer. Lt. Dan Jones, district commander said relations between the county and the local ISP post are very positive. "We really have a good relationship here," he said.

August 12, 2009

ATTN ISP RETIREES

If you are interested in being eligible to

carry your firearms in other states, click on the following

attached letter from Superintendent Paul Whitesell Ph.D.

August 09, 2009

Drunk driver tries to pull over off-duty trooper

EVANSVILLE, INDIANA---An intoxicated motorist landed in jail Saturday night when he rolled up beside a car, flashed his wallet and told the other driver to pull over, according to police documents.

The only problem: The motorist, 43-year-old Cary W. Melton, is not a police officer and the driver of the other car was.

Melton was arrested on preliminary charges of impersonating a public servant, driving without a valid license and operating while intoxicated. He was released from the Vanderburgh County Jail today on a $750 cash bond.

According to an Indiana State Police probable cause affidavit, off-duty trooper Scott Qualls was in his personal vehicle stopped about at Fulton Avenue and the Lloyd Expressway when a white truck drove up beside him. It happened about 10:45 p.m.

The driver of the truck - later identified as Melton - "opened a wallet in the manner of trying to show an identification and told Trooper Qualls to pull over ... in a manner appearing to be a public servant," according to the affidavit.

Qualls pulled over but "the suspect yelled to him out of his vehicle and took off going north on Fulton Ave. while laughing," the affidavit said.

Qualls called the Indiana State Police post and followed Melton as he turned onto Cedar Street and came to a dead-end. Melton initially backed up as though he was going to hit Qualls' vehicle but the stopped it and got out, police said.

On-duty Evansville Police Department and Indiana State Police vehicles arrived a short time later.

According to the affidavit, Melton failed a field sobriety test and later registered a 0.16 blood-alcohol level, which is twice the legal limit for driving.

August 05, 2009

REPORT MARIJUANA GROWERS

The marijuana eradication efforts of the Indiana State Police are currently underway throughout Indiana and will continue year round. In years past, troopers have been successful in eliminating outdoor cultivated marijuana and growers of the illegal drug have reverted to indoor grow operations.

Outdoors, marijuana growers typically grow their plants on other people’s property and in farmer’s crops. Indoors, they establish elaborate grow operations using artificial lighting, traditional planting methods and hydroponics within outbuildings and residential homes. Typically, the growers will attempt to conceal the indoor grow operation by covering the home or outbuilding windows from the inside.

Growing marijuana is a crime and is punishable by fines and imprisonment. Failure to report or destroy marijuana plants is also a crime.

Marijuana growers:

The public can anonymously report suspicious activity around crop fields, outbuildings and residential homes where the possibility of growing marijuana is suspected to Senior Trooper Ron Halbert Jr. The Marijuana Tip Line is 888-873-1694 or 800-761-2985.

August 04, 2009

From BOD Member Dave and Jan Lloyd's daughter


Hello My Precious Family and Friends!

It's been over 4 months since I returned to California from Iraq and nearly as long since I have written to you. I realize an update is long overdue, as many changes have taken place in my life since last March. When I first returned to Camp Pendleton, I went back to my old unit, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, as the Communications Officer. However, I was not meant to stay there for long, as the 1st Marine Logistics Group G-6 pulled me to transfer and work in a higher level of Marine Corps communications planning. I am now the Assistant Operations Officer for the 1st MLG G-6 (Communications). The "G Offices" work directly for the 1st MLG Commanding General. My job is pretty diverse and includes representing the G-6 in meetings to brief the General on current communications operations and equipment, having oversight of communications gear, enforcing accountability of equipment within the MLG units, planning the personnel and equipment for upcoming deployments to Afghanistan, ensuring units have the needed gear to train, and having an oversight of all communication operations, equipment, and training within the 1st MLG. Some days I am very busy, briefing in meetings where I am the junior officer, working out communication equipment issues with my superiors, and drafting/reviewing communication operation documents. I have found that the biggest change in my job is the fact that I do not have a platoon of marines in my charge anymore and that many of my daily interactions are now with senior officers and senior enlisted Marines.

I've also met an incredible young man who has become very important to me and an integral part of my life. He is a Marine Corps Military Police Officer and we actually met in Iraq. We were first introduced when both of us were briefing the Commanding General about a new mission. 1st Lt Jared Justice was chosen by his Company Commander to be the Officer in Charge of the Military Police Mission and I was responsible for the Communications Plan. We caught one another's eye then, but Jared was away from Al Taqaddum on missions for about one half of our deployment. For the last half of our deployment, Jared was appointed as the Executive Officer of the Military Police Company. Since I was the Executive Officer of Headquarters and Service Company, we began attending many of the same meetings and awards boards. We discovered that both of us enjoy working out, so towards the end of the deployment, as our responsibilities slowed down, we were able to meet almost every day for a workout. Once we returned California (he is stationed at Camp Pendleton as well), we began training for the San Diego Marathon, which we ran together at the end of May. Training for, and then running 26.2 miles together is a bonding experience and we had a great time getting to know one another in the process! We've been dating since the week after we returned from Iraq and are doing very well together! :)

Another change on the horizon is deciding whether or not I will transition out of the Marine Corps next June. With the current operational tempo of the USMC, if I stay in, there is a very good chance that I would have to deploy to Afghanistan. This is not something that I want to do. At the same time, I haven't determined what my "dream job" will look like when I re-join the civilian workforce. My USMC experience has given me the opportunity to further develop my leadership skills, develop personnel management and supervising skills, and become proficient in communication planning. I realize the job market is slow, and my initial job may not be my first career choice, but I accept the fact that I have to delve into wherever I am with a good attitude, always ready for the challenges I will face!

Thank you for letting me share my life with you! Your prayers and support are always appreciated!

I would enjoy hearing from you too!

Serving God and Our Country,
Tiffany

3564 Paseo Delos Californianos
#159
Oceanside, CA 92056

August 03, 2009

State Police Lt. Gary Dudley Charity Bike Ride Announcement

Attached below is information on a charity bicycle ride that will be held in honor of Indiana State Police Lt. Gary E. Dudley. All proceeds from this family event, being held at the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy, in Plainfield, IN, will go toward the continued funding of the Gary Dudley Memorial Scholarship Fund (GDMF). Complete details are in the attachment.

You may recall Lt. Dudley and Chief Gary Martin were both killed on August 22, 2006. The date of this event is August 22, 2009 – the third year anniversary of the crash that claimed their lives.

Carolyn Dudley, the surviving spouse of Lt. Dudley, is the current President of the Indiana Chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS). She will be at the event all day and is available for print and radio interviews anytime from now up to and including the event day. For TV markets in the greater Indianapolis area Mrs. Dudley is also available for TV interviews during the weeks prior to the event or as a in-studio guest for weekend news interviews.

Carolyn Dudley may be contacted by email at bikecentury@comcast.net or by cell at 317.752.7628.

For more information about this event, please go to www.indianacops.org , click on “EVENTS” to Gary’s Ride.

  

July 31, 2009

C.O.P.S. Cyclists “Roll” Into Richmond

RichmondPolice Officers cycling for C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors) rolled into Richmond this afternoon, stopping at the Richmond Police Department for the night. The ride started with a short ceremony on July 20th in front of the Fallen Officers Memorial outside the Indiana Government Center in Indianapolis and will conclude tomorrow, Saturday, August 1st, in Indianapolis.

Indiana C.O.P.S. operates as a peer support network for survivors of line-of-duty death according to federal criteria.  Their primary goal is to be there for all survivors on a day-to-day basis, assisting them with anything they need.  Indiana Concerns of Police Survivors provides resources to assist in the rebuilding of the lives of surviving families of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. They provide training to law enforcement agencies on survivor victimization issues and educate the public.

 In 2008 there were 138 officers killed across the nation.  In Indiana during 2008 two officers were killed in separate traffic crashes.  Each death results in untold numbers of family and co-workers left behind to cope with the tragic loss. C.O.P.S. provides resources to help them rebuild their shattered lives.

Cops’ Cycling for Indiana C.O.P.S. consists of Indiana Police Officers along with friends, family and survivors that will bicycle a total of 878 miles around Indiana to honor fallen officers who have died in the line of duty.  In 2008 Cops Cycling for COPS raised nearly $40,000. 

The group will depart Richmond around 7 a.m. on Saturday, August 1st, traveling US 40 west to Knightstown for lunch. They’ll continue west on US 40 to Indianapolis, taking streets to Butler University. They will stage at Butler University for movement to Crown Hill Cemetery for closing ceremonies.

MEDIA NOTE:  During this ride media may call M/Tpr. Rich Crawford at 317-650-8961 for interviews during daylight hours.    

***************************

Cyclists stop in Muncie to honor families of fallen cops

MUNCIE---The Concerns of Police Survivors annual charity bicycle ride made a stop in Muncie on Friday, honoring the families of five area police officers killed in the line of duty.

In a city hall ceremony, the riders honored the families of Stephen Singer, a Muncie officer killed in 1989; Gregg Winters, a Muncie officer fatally wounded in 1990; Robert J. Garrison, a state trooper from the Redkey post killed in 1959; Roy Jones, a state trooper from the Pendleton Post killed in 1979, and Dave Sandler, an Indianapolis officer killed in 1986.

The cyclists finish their 13-day, 900-mile ride today at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.

Thirteen riders, including Ball State University police officer John Foster, are expected to complete the entire trip, while an estimated 27 others joined for shorter distances.

Riders in attendance at Friday's ceremony numbered 24 and came from as far as Merrillville.

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Cops Cycling for Indiana C.O.P.S arrive at Redkey

Cops cycling for C.O.P.S. (Concerns of Police Survivors) began with a short ceremony in front of the Fallen Officers Memorial outside the Indiana Government Center in Indianapolis July 20th. The ride’s first stop was in Bloomington to honor fallen Deputy Sarah Jones of the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department who was killed in October of 2008. The riders stopped at the Indiana State Police Redkey District this morning for refreshments before continuing to the Muncie Police Department for lunch.

Indiana C.O.P.S. operates as a peer support network for survivors of line-of-duty death according to federal criteria. Their primary goal is to be there for all survivors on a day-to-day basis, assisting them with anything they need. Indiana Concerns of Police Survivors also provides resources to assist in the rebuilding of the lives of surviving families of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. Furthermore, C.O.P.S. provides training to law enforcement agencies on survivor victimization issues and educates the public of the need to support the law enforcement profession and its survivors.

Nationally well over 100 law enforcement officers are killed each year. In 2008 there were 138 officers killed across the nation. In Indiana during 2008 two officers were killed in separate traffic crashes. Each death results in untold numbers of family and co-workers left behind to cope with the tragic loss. C.O.P.S. provides resources to help them rebuild their shattered lives.

Cops Cycling for Indiana C.O.P.S. consist of Indiana Police Officers along with friends, family and survivors that will bicycle 878 miles around Indiana to honor fallen officers who have died in the line of duty. The 2008 Cops Cycling for COPS raised nearly $40,000. Money raised from this event and other sources will assist in providing financial assistance to family members of fallen officers by helping defray the costs associated with National Police Week. National C.O.P.S seminars for children, siblings, parents, adult children and spouses of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty, needs associated with criminal trials, continuous support of survivors in need and support items and business needs of the Indiana Chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors.

MEDIA NOTE:  During the duration of this ride media may call Master Trooper Rich Crawford at 317-650-8961 for interviews during daylight hours.

The complete route of the ride is attached on the following two pages. 

Visit http://www.indianacops.org for more information.

2009 Cops Cycling for IN COPS Route

Day 1, July 20 – Indianapolis - Bloomington   65 miles

Depart Indy at 0930 hrs via city streets to S/B SR 37 stopping in Martinsville for lunch. SR 37  to Bloomington exiting at College St to the Monroe Co SD for Memorial Service

Day 2, July 21 – Bloomington - Madison   83 miles

Depart Bloomington (0700) via SR 446 south to US 50 continuing east on US 50 to Brownstown for lunch. Continue from Brownstown on SR 39 south to SR 250 east to SR 7. Traveling south on SR 7 into Madison

Day 3, July 22 – Madison - Jeffersonville   50 miles

Depart Madison (0700) south on SR 62 to New Washington for lunch. Continue on SR 62 south to Jeffersonville for overnight at Jeffersonville FOP Lodge.

Day 4, July 23 – Jeffersonville - Huntingburg   76 miles

Depart Jeffersonville (0700) on SR 64 west stopping for lunch at location TBD. Continue on SR 64 to SR 231 then north to Huntingburg

Day 5, July 24 – Huntingburg - Vincennes  62 miles

Depart Huntingburg (0700) on SR 64 west to Princeton for lunch. Continue on SR 64 to US 41 north to Vincennes

Day 6 July 25 - Vincennes -Terre Haute   60 miles

Depart Vincennes (0700) on SR 41 north to Sullivan for lunch. Continue on SR 41 north to Terre Haute

Day 7, July 26 - Terre Haute - Kentland   97 miles

Depart Terre Haute (0700) on SR 63 north to Lunch at SR 63/I-74. Continue on SR 63 to SR 41 to Kentland

Day 8, July 27 – Kentland - Merrillville   64 miles

Depart Kentland (0700) on SR 41 north. Lunch in Lowell. Continue on SR 41 north to Merrillville

Day 9, July 28 – Merrillville - South Bend   70 miles

Depart Merrillville (0700) on US 30 east to SR 2 east to Laporte for lunch. Continue on SR 2 to South Bend

Day 10, July 29 - South Bend - Angola   70 miles

Depart South Bend (0700) on county roads the parallel US 20 to Middlebury for Lunch. Continue on County roads paralleling US 20 to Angola

Day 11, July 30 – Angola - Bluffton   83 miles

Depart Angola (0700) on Old US 27 south to CR 39 to SR 427 to Tonkel Road downtown to Fort Wayne Headwaters Park for Lunch. Continue out of Ft. Wayne on city streets to SR 27 to Decatur depart west on SR 224 to SR 1 south to Bluffton 

Day 12, July 31 –Bluffton - Richmond   90 miles

Depart Bluffton at (0700) on SR1 south to SR 67 south to downtown Muncie for lunch. Depart Muncie on SR 35 (Bike Path for 20+ miles) and continuing on SR 35 south to Richmond

Day 13, Aug 1 – Richmond - Indianapolis (Crown Hill Cemetery)   73 miles

Depart Richmond (0700) on US 40 west to Knightstown for lunch. Continue west on US 40 to Indianapolis city limits to Butler University via city streets. Stage at Butler Univ. for movement to Crown Hill for 1600 CLOSING CEREMONY

**********************

C.O.P. bicycle riders eastbound into the Angola Area on 072909

Photos courtesy of the Steuben County Sheriff Department

Deputy Brad Kline 76-21

July 30, 2009

Carbon Motors Selects Indiana

Site Selection Announcement Made at “A Rally for American Jobs”

by Indiana Economic Development Corporation

CONNERSVILLE, INDIANA---Carbon Motors Corporation, a new homeland security company, announced at “A Rally for American Jobs” that the State of Indiana, Fayette County, and the City of Connersville would be its new home. Governor Mitch Daniels, Mayor Leonard Urban and thousands of Hoosiers were present for the unexpected announcement that had been in the works with the leadership and support of U.S. Senator Dick Lugar, U.S. Senator Evan Bayh, and Congressman Mike Pence. The jobs rally, held at a shuttered automotive facility, demonstrated the commitment of state, county and city officials, and clearly reflected the determination, spirit, and commitment of its workforce.

Carbon Motors will invest over $350 million in developing and producing the Carbon E7, which is slated for start of production in 2012. According to the Enterprise Innovation Institute, the Carbon Campus, which will house the entirety of its operation, is expected to bring 10,000 new direct and indirect American jobs to the region to support the production of the world’s first purpose-built law enforcement patrol vehicle. It is estimated that the Company will have a $3 billion positive economic impact over ten years.

“We are creating new American jobs of national importance and it was only appropriate to announce that at a very unique ‘Rally for American Jobs’. It is essential that the local, state, and federal authorities work in concert with the private sector to deliver on our country’s moral obligation to provide our 840,000 law enforcement responders the appropriate equipment to secure our homeland against threats, both foreign and domestic,” remarked William Santana Li, chairman and chief executive officer, Carbon Motors Corporation. “With the unanimous vote of the Board of Directors, we are pleased and honored to announce that the great State of Indiana will become the police car capital of the world,” continued Li.

“We are thrilled at the possibilities that Carbon Motors represents and, I’ll be honest, especially at their selection of Connersville for the factory they hope to build. This company, in this former capital of American manufacturing, would make a tremendous symbol of economic rebirth and Hoosier leadership in it,” said Governor Mitch Daniels.

KEY FACTS

Carbon Motors Corporation is a bold, new homeland security company on a critical mission to design, develop, manufacture, distribute, service, and recycle, the world’s first purpose-built patrol vehicle. The Carbon E7 vehicle was recently at the U.S. Capitol for review by the U.S. Senate and subsequently at the U.S. House of Representatives.

This new homeland security technology platform will have a positive effect on every town, city, county, state, airport, college campus, border, and port of the United States of America – a social benefit nationwide. The country’s law enforcement fleet is the most visible government fleet across the nation and it must lead by example. By creating thousands of new American jobs, providing our law enforcement first responders the appropriate level of equipment, and doing so in an environmentally responsible manner, we can establish a tangible new symbol for “America is Back”. It is in the national interest of the United States from all levels of the public and private sector that the Carbon E7 be expedited to full-scale production. The opportunities the Carbon E7 vehicle represents cut across several cabinet level positions:

U.S. Department of Energy

U.S. Department of Homeland Security

U.S. Department of Justice

U.S. Department of Labor

U.S. Department of Transportation

About Carbon Motors Corporation

Carbon Motors Corporation is a bold, new homeland security company on a critical mission to design, develop, manufacture, distribute, service, and recycle, the world’s first purpose-built patrol vehicle.

********************

GARY'S RIDE 2009

Hi Karen-hope all is well at ITA.  I f possible, could you put some info about this year's GARY'S RIDE on the ITA website?

GARY'S RIDE 2009 will be held on Saturday, August 22 (3 year E.O.W.) at ILEA in Plainfield.  All proceeds from the ride benefit the Gary Dudley Memorial Scholarship Foundation, which awards college scholarships to the children of Police Officers from Indiana who died in the Line of Duty. 

GARY'S RIDE is a recreational bicycle ride with various routes ranging from 1 mile to 100 miles.  For more information about the ride, visit www.indianacops.org  or register online at www.signmeup.com 

 Thanks

Carolyn Dudley

******************************

  COPS ride brings emotional evening for local families, riders 

ANGOLA — The Indiana Concerns of Police Survivors bicycle tour of the state was designed, chairman Mitch Crawford said, to provide those participating with a feeling for the pain and suffering that survivors’ families feel each day.

The COPS ride returned to Angola at around 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, with 24 riders being escorted in by area police agencies.

The cyclists then met with five area surviving families of officers who have been killed in the line of duty.

Crawford said those meetings with survivors mean a lot to the riders, who come from across the state to participate in the 13-day trip.

“It means a lot to the cyclists to meet those survivors and I think it means something to the survivors to meet them as well,” Crawford said.

“The cyclists are going through a lot of suffering on the ride, but is nothing compared to what those survivors endure every day. It’s a good bonding opportunity.

We’re letting them know we are honoring them and the officers.”

Angola Mayor Richard Hickman spoke briefly at the event, noting that he had an uncle who’d been killed in the line of duty before he was born.

“Thank you for allowing us to remember these men and women, and thank you for reminding us that you’re just like one of us,” Hickman said.

Kim Haylett and her husband Wayne were among the survivor families honored at the event.

Their daughter, Sarah Haylett Jones was a Monroe County Sheriff’s Deputy.

 She was struck by a vehicle last year while directing traffic around an accident near Bloomington.

The Hayletts live south of Coldwater, Mich. Kim said she was gratified that the riders were taking the time to remember her daughter.

“My first reaction is that I’ve always felt an enormous sense of pride in her being an officer,” Haylett said.

“We are honored that they want to honor our daughter, but she deserves it.

They all deserve it, and not just the officers who’ve been killed. They sacrifice a lot to protect us.”

She recalled that her daughter had always felt an enormous sense of pride from wearing her uniform.

“She loved being an officer,” she said.

Crawford said the riders would be housed overnight at Trine University before leaving today at 7 a.m.

The riders will go south along Old U.S. 27 to Auburn, where they will stop for a break, then on to Fort Wayne for lunch and to Decatur for a memorial, before settling down for the night in Bluffton.

**************************

K-9 “Kilo” Cashes In

On yesterday’s date at approximately 7:30 PM, Indiana State Police K-9 Handler, Trooper Nathan Abbott, stopped a 2008 Chevrolet at the Seven Mile Marker on Interstate 65 Southbound. The vehicle was stopped for a speeding violation. As Trooper Abbott spoke to the driver and the passenger in the vehicle something just did not seem right. He retrieved his K-9 “Kilo” from his police car and walked “Kilo” around the stopped vehicle. When he did this, “Kilo” alerted for possible narcotics in the vehicle.

The vehicle was searched and troopers located $30,000.00 in U. S. Currency bundled together by rubber bands. The denominations ranged from One Dollar Bills to One Hundred Dollar Bills. After locating the money, “Kilo” sniffed the bundled currency. “Kilo” alerted on the currency. This alert tells police that some or all of the monies sniffed had possibly been in recent close quarters with narcotics.

During the course of the vehicle stop troopers developed probable cause to believe the currency had been possibly used in the purchase and/or sale of narcotics. The currency was seized and forfeiture proceedings are pending.

Both occupants of the vehicle were released. Due to the pending investigation the names of the occupants will not be released.  

***************************

Update on Chuck Hampshire PE1092 following recent back surgery

Good morning all!

I didn't get home last night until 11pm so I decided phone calls were out of the question....I know you are all glad about that one :-). Chuck's surgeon said all went very well. His spine was strong enough not to need the cage, so he used screws and rods. He harvested bone from the spinal stenosis and also used some artificial bone to avoid a pelvis bone graft which eliminated a second surgery site. This means less pain....another plus! Your prayers helped and God is good!

They have Chuck on a morphine pump so he's in and out of consciousness and seems to be able to rest even with all four of his daughters and one granddaughter and me yacking in his room :-). Chuck had a pretty good support group surrounding him.

The Dr. anticipates releasing him possibly on Friday, depending on pain control, drainage, etc. Knowing Chuck he'll be trying to escape Thursday.

He's at the Lutheran Orthopaedic Hospital room 2510. The nurses station is 1-800-444-2001. They did not hook up his phone yesterday because he's not yet able to communicate well. Who knows what today will bring. I'll keep you posted through the computer and will have my cell on 260-668-6862 should you have any questions feel free to call.

Thanks again for all of your prayers and please keep praying that he heals quickly and avoids any complications. He said he wasn't coming home if they didn't fix him so as you can see he hasn't lost his sense of humor :-). Tina (Mrs. Chuck Hampshire)

July 29, 2009

Don Cox reports the following health bulletin on Rick VanNess PE1634

Don - Heard from my son Mark, who is a Marion County Deputy Prosecutor, that retired Sgt. Rick VanNess, employed as an Investigator within that Office, is in Methodist Hospital in critical condition with what appears to be an inoperative brain tumor. His address is:

Rick VanNess
Progressive Care Unit
Room #5091
Methodist Hospital
1701 North Senate Blvd.
Indianapolis, IN 46202

I suspect, given that Rick was a counselor at the ILEA for many years during his tenure within the Training Division, that he is as well known within the Indiana Law Enforcement Community as any retired Officer we have within our ranks. Request you make this information known via the outstanding 'informative service' you have provided us for so many years.

Respectfully, Ken Hollingsworth, #1373

**********************

Police car maker picks Connersville, Indiana for factory

CONNERSVILLE, INDIANA---A startup company that plans to build high-tech police cars has picked a vacant auto-parts plant in eastern Indiana for its first factory.

The announcement Wednesday by the chairman of Atlanta-based Carbon Motors Corp. drew cheers from the large crowd gathered inside the former Visteon plant in Connersville.

The company says it intends to invest $350 million in the plant and potentially hire 1,550 workers.

Carbon Motors' decision had been eagerly awaited among Connersville residents as the company considered sites in several states.

The Connersville area had a 15.9 percent unemployment rate in June. Michigan-based Visteon stopped production in 2007 at its factory, which once employed more than 3,000 people.

July 22, 2009

Indiana state police plan to target aggressive drivers

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA---Concerns over semi-trailer accidents like the one that took place Monday on I-65 in White County have prompted a new program by Indiana State Police. Troopers plan to use semis to target aggressive drivers.

They've teamed up the Indiana Motor Truck Association , who will provide trucks for the program.

"We want people to be careful, even when they don't know that there's state police around," said Sergeant Wayne Flick with Indiana State Police.

Troopers plan to ride side-by-side with truck drivers.

"He will, inevitably, see drivers doing stuff that they wouldn't normally be doing if they knew it was a trooper around," Sergeant Flick said.

Truck drivers say the view drivers get from a car and a truck are totally different.

"We're trying to be professional, give everybody more room, but we can't do that when everybody is sitting there trying to cut us off because they are in a hurry," explained Milton Cagle of Ohio.

Cagle has been a truck driver for 15 years.

"You know, we've got 80,000 pounds out on the road, we can't stop on a dime like the cars can -- and they expect us to," Cagle said.

Cagle likes the state police plan. So do some car drivers.

"I think it's great, anything for the safety of the public. There's a lot of people doing things that they shouldn't be doing in cars," motorist Scott Retherford said.

Heather Cline isn't sure it the idea will work.

"We are going to do what we want to do, regardless. It doesn't matter if somebody is driving in something else, we're going to do what we want to do, regardless," Cline said.

State police won't actually use the semis to chase down the reckless drivers. If they catch someone driving unsafe, they'll just call on other troopers in the area to make the stop.

July 21, 2009

Police start charity bike ride across Indiana

INDIANAPOLIS---Several police personnel have started a charity bicycle ride around Indiana to commemorate the loss of fallen officers.

The ride began Monday morning at the Statehouse and continues for 13 consecutive days covering 878 miles. It will range from towns along the Ohio River to South Bend and other northern Indiana communities before concluding on the afternoon of Aug. 1 at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.

Of the 40 police personnel taking part, 13 plan to ride the entire distance. The ride helps raise money for the survivors of officers who die in the line of duty.

Indiana had two police officers die last year - state Trooper Daniel Barrett and Monroe County sheriff's Deputy Sarah Jones. They were both killed in traffic crashes

July 19, 2009

Let's send Jim a card or note

Jim Falls PE645

Thought you may want to pass this along to former colleagues, classmates or friends of Jim Falls PE645, former F/Sgt at South Bend Post.

Jim has been recuperating for some time at Tripler Army Hospital in Honolulu as the result of a serious illness.

He is on a feeding tube and, according to his wife, probably will be for the rest of his life.

He apparently is doing well however. No doubt he would like to hear from some of his friends (I hesitate to use the word "old").

July 17, 2009

Motorcycle Unit Assigned to ISP Peru Post

Master Trooper Vern Robinson

Recently, Master Trooper Vern Robinson completed training at the Deeley Harley Davidson Motorcycle Officers School in Ontario, Canada. The school is located on the campus of the Ontario Police College in Aylmer, Ontario. The school trains motorcycle officers from all over the United States and Canada. The rigorous two week motorcycle school enhances an officer’s basic motorcycle handling skills through advanced high and low speed maneuvering, highway operation, and safety techniques unique to police motorcycle units. The students were required to complete eight separate phases in order to become a certified motorcycle officer.

Prior to completing the motorcycle school, Robinson was assigned road patrol duties for the Indiana State Police Peru Post. He is now assigned to the Indiana State Police Operations Support Division as motorcycle patrol unit. He will work from the Indiana State Police Peru Post. Robinson will utilize a 2009 Harley Davidson Electra Glide Motorcycle to patrol northern Indiana from March 1st through November 30. He will patrol in a police car during the winter months and inclement weather. The motorcycle is equipped with dual head radar, emergency lighting with siren, and a hands free radio system.  

The mission of the motorcycle program is to reduce the number and severity of crashes on Indiana roadways. This is to be accomplished through public education and strict traffic enforcement. The Indiana State Police has identified several primary causation factors related to motor vehicle crashes. They are speeding, operating while intoxicated, disregarding a traffic control device, improper passing, following too closely, unsafe lane movement, and failure to yield. The motorcycle program along with the Indiana State Police high performance Mustang vehicle program is designed to combat such driving behaviors.

Robinson is the second motorcycle patrol unit working from the Indiana State Police Peru Post. The Indiana State Police currently has 25 motorcycle patrol units working from various posts throughout Indiana.

July 16, 2009

We remember Dave

Eleven Years Ago Today

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2009 Indiana Concerns of Police Survivors (Indiana COPS)

Annual Charity Bicycle Ride

Across Indiana 

            The 2009 Cops Cycling for COPS Team will visit Angola on their ride across Indiana.   The ride begins on Monday, July 20 at the Police & Fire Memorial near the State House and continues for 13 consecutive days covering 878 miles.  The ride across Indiana will conclude on August 1st at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.

            The purpose of the ride is to honor the memory of Indiana’s fallen law enforcement officers and to raise funds for the Indiana Concerns of Police Survivors.  Along their route they stop to visit the gravesites and meet with the families of these brave officers who gave their all serving and protecting our citizens.

            Indiana lost two law enforcement officers in 2008; Indiana State Police Trooper Daniel Barrett of the Peru Post and Monroe County Deputy Sheriff Sarah Hawlett-Jones. Jones is from the Bronson, Michigan area and is buried near there. 

Officers who will be honored that have families living in the Angola area are

·         Patrolman Kenneth P. Stiverson, Ft. Wayne PD – 7/17/69

·         Town Marshal William Miner, Jr.,  Avilla – 5/28/83

·         Master Trp. David Deuter, Indiana State Police – 7/16/98

·         Officer Craig Herbert, Lawrence PD – 3/6/05

·         Deputy Sarah Haylett-Jones, Monroe Co. Sheriff Dept – 10/19/08

The Indiana Troopers Association is honored to again host the team of 23 cyclists as they visit our town on Wednesday, July 29th.  Surviving family members and friends of these fallen officers will be invited to join the cycle team as our guests at a buffet dinner at Sutton’s Deli in downtown Angola compliments of the ITA.

            Overnight accommodations will be provided by Trine University; Angola City Police and the Steuben County Sheriff’s Department, as well as the Indiana State Police will provide escorts into Angola around 5pm on Wednesday, July 29th and again as they depart our town around 7am on Thursday, July 30th.

            For more information, please contact the Indiana Troopers Association office at 260-624-2926.

July 12, 2009

4,725 Total Units Collected in 2009 Indiana Fallen Officer Blood Drive

Hello everyone!
 
4,725! is the official count for UNITS received this year for the 2009 IN Fallen Officer Blood Drive!! More than 5,000 presenters! I think this is wonderful to have collected this many units on behalf of our IN Fallen Officers! Another successful year!~   

In our short 3 year history of the IN Fallen Officer Blood Drive, we have collected approximately 15,000 units of blood across the State of Indiana! Thanks to all of you for your dedication and hard work to make this happen!
 
I am looking forward to working with each one of you again next year!
 
Janice Starnes

July 12, 2009

Sgt. Chip Sunier, 34-year-veteran of the Indiana State Police injured in Crash

Putnam County---A state trooper is recovering from injuries sustained in a traffic accident Saturday afternoon.

Indiana State Police Sgt. Chip Sunier was traveling west on US 40 just west of CR 675 East in Putnam County when his vehicle began to hydroplane due to standing water on the roadway. The county was receiving heavy rains at the time of the crash.

Sgt. Sunier, who was responding to assist a Putnam County Deputy with a possibly intoxicated driver, went off the north side of US 40 and struck several trees on the passenger side of his cruiser. He was taken to Hendricks County Hospital before being transferred to Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis.

His injuries include two broken ribs, a punctured lung and a cracked pelvis, but is expected to make a full recovery.

Sgt. Sunier is a 34-year-veteran of the Indiana State Police.

July 07, 2009

Indiana state troopers, Chick-fil-A team to buy drug dog

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA---Every week, Indiana State Police Trooper Mike Carroll has to let go at least five vehicles that he believes contain drugs.

Carroll works primarily in LaGrange and Noble counties, where methamphetamine has become a scourge and lab busts are among the highest in the state.

But without consent or probable cause, he can’t search the vehicles or their drivers for drugs, he said.

A police dog could change all that, Carroll said. Trained to sniff out and identify drugs inside cars, a police dog’s behavior can give court-admissible cause for police to search a car.

In addition to finding drugs, the dogs can find missing people and track down suspects, Carroll said.

The trouble is, Carroll said, the state police have always had difficulty finding money for police dogs.

The state police post in Fort Wayne, which covers northeast Indiana, fields three troopers with police dogs. But they work in the district’s southern counties.

With a dog and its equipment costing $10,000 to $12,000, Carroll, formerly with the Kendallville Police Department, must rely on grants and community support.

He has applied for grants and talked to business leaders in his patrol areas, but LaGrange and Noble have been two of Indiana’s counties that were the hardest hit by the recession.

To help raise money for a police dog, both Fort Wayne Chick-fil-A locations are donating a portion of their daily sales today to the Indiana State Police Alliance.

Carroll and a state trooper and his dog will be at the Glenbrook Square location at noon and at the Jefferson Pointe restaurant about 1 p.m.

Jeff Hoffman, the owner/operator of the Jefferson Pointe store, said the fundraiser is a way for the company to have a positive effect on the community.

July 07, 2009

They Rode to Remember

Wabash---Sunday, July 5, marked the two year anniversary of the death of Indiana State Police Master Trooper Detective David E. Rich. Detective Rich, an 18 year veteran of the Indiana State Police Department, had stopped to help what he believed was a stranded motorist on U.S. 24 in Wabash County. The male motorist, from Gaylord, MI, shot and killed Rich. Detective Rich left behind a wife and three children.

Roadside Cross honoring Dave Rich

On July 5, 2009, members of Chapter XIII of the Blue Knights Motorcycle Club chose to honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Detective Rich and his family by dedicating their Fourth of July ride in his memory. During the day long ride, stops were made at the cemetery in Wabash County, where a new head stone had recently been placed on Rich’s grave site, the park in the city of Wabash, named in Rich’s honor, and the roadside cross where Rich was shot. Riders also remembered Trooper Daniel R. Barrett who was killed in the line of duty on January 27, 2008 in a crash on U.S. 31 in Fulton County. Members concluded the ride by stopping at the roadside cross where Trooper Barrett died.

Dave Rich Gravesite

“We will never forget the ultimate sacrifice made by our friends, “stated Indiana State Police Master Trooper Ron Whitney, Chapter XIII president. “We were able to combine our love of motorcycle riding with honoring those who set the ultimate example of self sacrifice to ones community. It was an enjoyable, yet humbling day.”

Roadside Cross hornoring Dan Barrett

The Blue Knights is a non-profit fraternal organization consisting of active and retired law enforcement officers who enjoy riding motorcycles. The first club was formed in Bangor, ME, in 1974. There are 599 chapters with almost 20,000 members in 29 countries. Chapter XIII was formed in January of 2006. Its members consist of active and retired law enforcement officers, as well as selected community members from north central Indiana. The Blue Knights hold various fund raising functions to raise money for various charities. Especially near to their hearts is helping children. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Make-a-Wish Foundation, Toys for Tots, D.A.R.E., and Concerns of Police Survivors are some examples of charities benefiting from the generosity of the Blue Knights. They also make cash donations to help local charities and citizens that are in need of a helping hand.

July 02, 2009

FORT WAYNE POST WELCOMES

A NEW K-9 TEAM

Trooper Shane Neuenschwander and his partner Smokey

Fort Wayne---The Indiana State Police post in Fort Wayne has added a third K-9 team to its District with the graduation of Trooper Shane Neuenschwander and his partner Smokey this morning at the Allen County Courthouse.

Neuenschwander and Smokey just completed 14 weeks of intense training in which Smokey was certified in drug detection, tracking, evidence (article) search, building search, obedience and controlled aggression.  They received over 500 hours of training which was conducted both during the daylight and nighttime hours. 

The training course was taught by Master Trainer Robert Compton of the Allen County Police Department.  Master Trainer Compton has trained all of the State Police K-9 teams currently in the field.  In September of 2005, Superintendent Paul E. Whitesell, Ph.D., implemented the multi-dimensional K-9 program which saw its first graduates in February of 2006.  With today’s graduation, the State Police has a total of 30 K-9 teams statewide.

The K-9 program has made numerous drug seizures as well as making hundreds of apprehensions.  Their tracking capabilities have been utilized to find children and elderly people who have become lost.  Neuenschwander and Smokey join the existing teams of Senior Trooper Brad Shultz and Gunnar and Master Trooper Gary Shenefield and Beau.  Neuenschwander, a graduate of the 60th Indiana State Police Recruit Academy in December of 2000, resides in rural Markle with his wife Traci, and his two sons, Kline (4) and Korben (2).  

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Work nearly done on new Indiana State Police Post

being built on the Indiana Toll Road

ELKHART---A new Indiana State Police headquarters building taking shape off the Indiana Toll Road in Elkhart County is nearly complete.

The structure, located north of the toll road off the east side of C.R. 17, will be the center of the ISP's toll road operations, replacing an aging structure in South Bend. Work started last year and ISP Lt. Dallard Tackett said it should be done by mid-July and occupied by Sept. 1.

"It's wonderful, especially now after being here in this building," said Tackett, referring to the South Bend structure, a converted 1950s-era gas station. "It's just going to be great."

Around 70 state police officers will be housed at the new 16,000-square-foot, $5 million building, equipped with a training room and a mechanics garage. There will also be office space for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Indiana State Excise Police, the Indiana Department of Homeland Security and the Indiana Gaming Commission.

The new building, tentatively called the Indiana Multi-Agency Law Enforcement Facility, would complement two other ISP locations along the toll road.

The cost of the new water and sewer lines extended from the city of Elkhart to the location, located in unincorporated Elkhart County, came in much lower than expected, $702,000 instead of the earlier estimate of $1.08 million. That will mean a smaller expense for the city, county and state, which jointly funded the lines.

The county will end up paying around $280,000 instead of $450,000; the city will pay $170,000 instead of $285,000; and the state will pay $205,000 instead of $300,000, according to County Administrator Tom Byers. The $47,000 contribution from a developer with land in the area stays the same.

The county's share of funds comes from money generated in the Northeast Tax Increment Finance District, where the new structure is located.

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Update on Aubrey Anderson

daughter of Trooper Caleb Anderson

follow her journal at the website underlined below

Bald IS Beautiful - Troopers Supporting Troopers!!

www.caringbridge.org/visit/aubreyanderson1

I’m beginning to realize that the ups and downs of dealing with a loved one with cancer are extreme and unpredictable.  Some days I wake up bright and cheery, thankful for my blessings, and I feel strong and confident in whatever the day might bring.  Other days I am frustrated that my daughter has to go through so stinking much that it almost makes me sick.  On those days I find myself wondering how the rest of the people in the world could possibly go on with their lives when ours has come to such an abrupt halt.  It’s true, I wonder if these feelings lessen over time or if it’s just something that will sneak up in me as long as I live.  Then, like on a day like today, we are still completely blown away by the kindness and loving support we are continually shown.  Caleb was asked how Aubrey was feeling and when the response was, “…actually, pretty good” he was told to take us (the kids and me) to the state police post.  When we arrived 35 State Troopers walked outside, all with freshly shaven heads.  How awesome is that?!  So Incredible!  We could hardly believe that even though Caleb has only been at this new post for 4 months that the guys would do something as amazing as that.  It meant so much to all of us and Aubrey loved seeing all the bald guys. 

Aubrey has been feeling fairly good.  She is a little more tired and I’ve noticed more bruising on her, so I am expecting her platelets to be low, but she is still playing most of the day, which is great – she is always exhausted by 6pm though.  Tomorrow we are going back to Lutheran Hospital to have Aubrey’s blood counts checked to see if she is in need of a transfusion or two.  She will most likely need hemoglobin and platelets because she is at the point where the latest chemo is starting to take its toll on her body, but we can’t be sure until we get her lab results.

I’d like to thank All of You that have helped and supported us through this journey.  Your thoughts, prayers, cards, gifts, and acts of kindness (like today) have helped us get to the point that we are at right now.  Thank you!!!

Troopers at the Fort Wayne Post recently shaved their heads in support of the 3 yr. old daughter of one of a fellow Troopers. Little Aubrey Anderson, daughter of Trooper Caleb Anderson, has been diagnosed with leukemia and is undergoing chemotherapy. Aubrey recently lost her long, pretty blonde hair, so her Dad's fellow troopers decided to "go bald" in a show of their support for Aubrey and her family.

July 01, 2009

Indiana State Police Adds Digital Evidence Examiner

Lowell---Indiana State Police Trooper Detective Alva Whited recently completed training at the National Computer Forensic Institute (NCFI) in Hoover, Alabama for computer forensics and digital evidence analysis. He was the first Indiana police officer to complete this training.

 The NCFI is run by the United States Secret Service and is a national cyber crimes training facility where state and local officers, as well as prosecutors and judges, are offered training and equipment.

Detective Whited provides the service and skill that is needed to recover files that have been deleted, hidden and accidentally or maliciously deleted or damaged.  He can collect evidence from computer systems, cell phones, external drive, memory cards, and other storage media.  Whited does this while maintaining the integrity of the data and the evidence by adhering to strict forensic procedures.

The most common computer crime in the news is child pornography, but computers are also instrumental in crimes ranging from check fraud to conspiracy cases.

Detective Whited stated, “A single image, document file, or email can provide the proof that clinches a case”.

Whited’s training is not just for state police use only; he will use his skills for any police agency in northwest Indiana including as far south as Montgomery County.

Whited has been on the department for nine years and lives with his family in Porter County.

June 27, 2009

Indiana Supreme Court  threw out

former Indiana state trooper David Camm's second conviction

Indiana Supreme Court on Friday threw out former Indiana state trooper David Camm's second conviction for the September 2000 murders of his wife and their two small children, sending the case back to Floyd County for a possible third trial.

In a 4-1 decision, the court said "speculative" evidence that Camm molested his daughter a day or two before the murders should not have been allowed by the judge because it could inflame the jury.

The court also said a friend's statement that Camm's wife, Kimberly, expected to see him at 7 to 7:30 the night of the murders should not have been allowed because it was hearsay that couldn't be challenged because Kimberly Camm is dead.

The ruling "is what's right, it's what's just," said Stacy Uliana, one of David Camm's lawyers.

Camm "was stunned, happy and relieved," Uliana said after she and co-counsel Katharine Liell called the Pendleton Correctional Facility to tell him about the decision.

Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson said he was surprised by the court's ruling.

Henderson and Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller said they intend to ask the Supreme Court to re-hear the case within the next 30 days. Henderson said he would decide whether to re-charge Camm after the court makes a decision on that request.

"I will weigh justice against the reality of what the state and community have to deal with in this 8Ω-year-old case," he said.

Nick Stein, the lawyer for Kimberly Camm's parents, Frank and Janice Renn, said the ruling was "devastating. It makes them sick to their stomachs."

Sam Lockhart, David Camm's uncle and a leader of his defense, said he expected the ruling.

"I know he's innocent," Lockhart said of his nephew.

At his first trial in 2002, Camm was convicted in Floyd County of murdering his wife, their 7-year-old son, Bradley, and 5-year-old daughter, Jill, in the garage of their Georgetown home. But the conviction was overturned by the Indiana Court of Appeals in August 2004.

The appeals court said claims from 12 women of Camm's extramarital affairs unfairly prejudiced the jury against him. In its decision, the appeals court also warned that the court handling a new trial should be careful in allowing speculative evidence that Jill was molested because it is so prejudicial.

But at Camm's second trial in Warrick County in 2006, Henderson was allowed to argue in his closing statement that Camm murdered his family to cover up the possible molestation.

The use of such speculative evidence as "the foundation" of the prosecutor's case requires the second conviction to be overturned, the Supreme Court said.

The court also said the trial court was correct in its decision to not allow the jury to hear evidence about the prior convictions of Charles Boney, Camm's co-defendant. Boney was found guilty of conspiracy and murder in a separate trial and was sentenced to 225 years in prison. Camm was sentenced to life without parole.

Camm's lawyers have argued that Boney committed the murders, and they should have been allowed to present evidence to the jury about his prior convictions.

Henderson said at a news conference Friday that he believes the eight-week retrial was conducted properly. "What the four (majority) justices have done today is rewritten Indiana law about presenting evidence," he said.

Referring to the Supreme Court's comments about the use of molestation evidence, he said, "surely the court isn't saying the condition of a deceased's body isn't relevant."

In evaluating whether to try Camm a third time, Henderson said, he will consider the difficulty of questioning witnesses about events that happened such a long time ago, and the impact of the Supreme Court's restrictions on what he can use as evidence.

The two trials have brought a heavy financial burden to Floyd County, Henderson said, with the county paying about $1million for the defense, since Camm was ruled indigent and his lawyers were paid as public defenders.

But despite the estimated $3million total price tag for the two trials, he said, his decision about whether to charge Camm again won't be based on the cost, "but to seek justice."

Carol Tobe, a Floyd County resident, said she was shocked when she heard that Camm's conviction had been overturned again.

"It seemed like it was settled," Tobe said. "You just really feel for the families, that the wounds have to be opened up again."

Stan Faith, who was the Floyd County prosecutor at the time of the murders and who tried Camm the first time, said he was confident that if necessary, Camm would be convicted a third time.

"I think 24 people have convicted him and now I think 36 will," Faith said.

In Friday's ruling, Chief Justice Randall Shepard dissented from the majority, arguing that "two reversals entered by the appellate courts in this case have unnecessarily sanitized the evidence" against Camm.

Shepard said at least some of the evidence about affairs on which Camm's first trial was reversed should have been allowed and that the affairs not long before the murders could be proof of a motive. He also said alleged evidence that Camm's daughter was molested was allowable as "an inference" about a motive.

The majority disagreed, however, saying there was no connection of Camm to the molestation.

Still, the majority also said there was enough evidence for a reasonable jury to convict Camm.

June 26, 2009

A message from Russ Wolfe

I have been in contact with the Sec/Treas of the IFFA ( Ind fire fighters Assn. ) and we have discussed an insurance supplement to Medicare. It started out that he had found one that would fit retired firefighters, and I asked if it might be ammended to include us. We came up with the word " retired public safety " . It was presented to the BOD and accepted.  Our retirees and spouses are included if they are interested. Anyone may contact him ; RALPH LUKE , 3619 Sloan Ave, Anderson, IN. 46013 - Tx  888-762-8102 or E-Mail luke1933@aol.com ( subject - INSURANCE ) 

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COPS ride to stop in Angola during July tour 

ANGOLA, INDIANA---The annual Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.) bike ride will return to Angola after a one-year absence later next month.

The ride, which honors fallen law enforcement officers from across the state, begins July 20, with a ride from Indianapolis to Bloomington, where Monroe County Sheriff’s Deputy Sarah Haylitt-Jones will be honored. She will also be honored when the tour arrives in Steuben County, as her family lives in the area and Haylitt-Jones is buried between Fremont and Coldwater, Mich.

Trooper Dave Deuter of rural Angola who was killed in the line of duty in LaGrange County in 1998, will also be honored at a ceremony when the tour arrives in Angola on July 29, Indiana Troopers Association director of operations Karen Shelton said. The families of both officers will be invited to the ceremony.

Shelton said the ride has traditionally stopped in Angola, but the route was changed last year in order to go through Peru and Logansport to honor officers who had died in those communities. Shelton said the riders have enjoyed coming through Steuben County in the past.

“They’ve told me they always like coming through Angola,” Shelton said. The riders will have dinner provided by Sutton’s Deli and the Trooper’s Association when they finish their 70-mile ride from South Bend.

The group will likely be housed at the Angola Public Safety Building before they depart the next morning on a ride to Bluffton.

June 25, 2009

Master Trooper Thomas Merkling

Fort Wayne Trooper Completes Photogrammetry Training

Master Trooper Thomas Merkling

Indianapolis---Indiana State Police Master Trooper Thomas Merkling recently completed photogrammetry training in Indianapolis. Master Trooper Merkling is a vehicle crash re-constructionist and this training will enhance his efforts in the reconstruction of serious or fatal crashes.

Photogrammetry is a computer based program that utilizes integrated digital photography with a specialized software program that creates scale diagrams of crash, or crime scenes that are accurate to within 1/8th of an inch. By comparison, a fatal crash scene may take several hours for investigators to collect evidence, measurements and to prepare a scale diagram utilizing previous traditional methods.

With photogrammetry, the same crash scene can be documented in possibly less than 30 minutes. The officers receiving this training are assigned to areas along the I-69 corridor from the Indiana-Michigan state line to Indianapolis, and I-65 from Chicago to Louisville.

The stimulus for this training has been the Indiana Traffic Incident Management Effort or IN-TIME. IN-TIME is a host of Indiana agencies dedicated to safer and more expedient traffic flow. The goal of IN-TIME is to reduce the time roadways are shut down due to the response, and investigation of major and minor traffic crashes.

Grants provided by the Indiana Department of Transportation, Indiana Department of Revenue Motor Carrier Services, the Indiana Toll Road, and the Federal Highway Administration, have been provided to train and equip 22 officers throughout Indiana. The training was conducted June 15-19 at the Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division in Indianapolis.

Sixteen troopers and officers from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, and Sheriff’s Departments from Boone, Clark, Delaware, Johnson, and Tippecanoe Counties attended the training.

**********************************

Lafayette Troopers Completes Photogrammetry Training

(Speeds Crash Investigations)

Trooper Jim Cody & Trooper Michael Krueger

Lafayette---Indiana State Troopers, Detective Jim Cody of the Criminal Investigations Division and Trooper Michael Krueger both assigned to the Lafayette Post, graduated from Photogrammetry Training School held in Indianapolis on June 19th.  Trooper Cody had previously graduated from Crash Reconstructionist School and this training will enhance his efforts in the field of crash reconstruction in serious or fatal crashes.

Photogrammetry is a computer based program that utilizes integrated digital photography with a specialized software program that allows the creation of scale diagrams of crash or crime scenes that are accurate to within 1/8th of an inch.  By comparison, a fatal crash scene may take several hours for investigators to collect evidence and measurements to prepare a scale diagram utilizing traditional historical methods.  Now, with Photogrammetry, the same crash scene can be documented in a fraction of the time, sometimes less than 30 minutes.  The officers receiving this training are assigned to areas along the I-69 corridor from the Indiana-Michigan state line to Indianapolis and I-65 from Chicago to Louisville.  The goal in the use of this new technology is to cut the crash investigation time to allow the roadways to be cleared and opened quicker which equates to less delay time for the motoring public.

The stimulus for this training has been the Indiana Traffic Incident Management Effort or IN-TIME.  IN-TIME is a host of Indiana agencies dedicated to safer and more expedient traffic flow.  The goal of IN-TIME is to cut the time roadways are shut down due to the response and investigation of major and even minor traffic incidents.  Through grants provided by the Indiana Department of Transportation, Indiana Department of Revenue Motor Carrier Services, the Indiana Toll Road, and the Federal Highway Administration, funds have been provided to train and equip 22 officers around the state.  The week long training was conducted June 15-19 at the Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division on the southwest side of Indianapolis.

Sixteen State Troopers were joined in the training by officers from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department.  A total of five sheriff’s departments were also represented: Clark County, Johnson County, Tippecanoe County, Boone County, and Delaware County.

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Trooper Kyle West and Sergeant Cedric Merritt

INDIANAPOLIS TROOPERS COMPLETE PHOTOGRAMMETRY TRAINING

Indianapolis---Indiana State Trooper Kyle West and Sergeant Cedric Merritt of the Indianapolis District recently completed photogrammetry training in Indianapolis. Trooper West and Sergeant Merritt are vehicle crash re-constructionists and this training will enhance their efforts in the reconstruction of serious or fatal crashes.

Photogrammetry is a computer based program that utilizes integrated digital photography with a specialized software program that creates scale diagrams of crash, or crime scenes that are accurate to within 1/8th of an inch. By comparison, a fatal crash scene may take several hours for investigators to collect evidence, and measurements, to prepare a scale diagram utilizing previous traditional methods.

With photogrammetry, the same crash scene can be documented in possibly less than 30 minutes. The officers receiving this training are assigned to areas along the I-69 corridor from the Indiana-Michigan state line to Indianapolis, and I-65 from Chicago to Louisville.

The stimulus for this training has been the Indiana Traffic Incident Management Effort or IN-TIME. IN-TIME is a host of Indiana agencies dedicated to safer and more expedient traffic flow. The goal of IN-TIME is to reduce the time roadways are shut down due to the response, and investigation of major and minor traffic crashes.

Grants provided by the Indiana Department of Transportation, Indiana Department of Revenue Motor Carrier Services, the Indiana Toll Road, and the Federal Highway Administration, have been provided to train and equip 22 officers through out Indiana. The training was conducted June 15-19 at the Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division in Indianapolis.

Sixteen troopers and officers from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, and Sheriff’s Departments from Boone, Clark, Delaware, Johnson, and Tippecanoe Counties attended the training.

**************************************

Trooper Nick Campbell of Redkey Post

Completes Photogrammetry Training

Indiana State Trooper Nick Campbell of the Redkey District recently completed photogrammetry training in Indianapolis. Trooper Campbell is a vehicle crash re-constructionist, and this training will enhance his efforts in the reconstruction of serious or fatal crashes.

Photogrammetry is a computer based program that utilizes integrated digital photography with a specialized software program that creates scale diagrams of crash, or crime scenes that are accurate to within 1/8th of an inch. By comparison, a fatal crash scene may take several hours for investigators to collect evidence, and measurements, to prepare a scale diagram utilizing previous traditional methods.

With photogrammetry, the same crash scene can be documented in possibly less than 30 minutes. The officers receiving this training are assigned to areas along the I-69 corridor from the Indiana-Michigan state line to Indianapolis, and I-65 from Chicago to Louisville.

The stimulus for this training has been the Indiana Traffic Incident Management Effort or IN-TIME. IN-TIME is a host of Indiana agencies dedicated to safer and more expedient traffic flow. The goal of IN-TIME is to reduce the time roadways are shut down due to the response, and investigation of major and minor traffic crashes.

Grants provided by the Indiana Department of Transportation, Indiana Department of Revenue Motor Carrier Services, the Indiana Toll Road, and the Federal Highway Administration, have been provided to train and equip 22 officers through out Indiana. The training was conducted June 15-19 at the Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division in Indianapolis.

Sixteen troopers and officers from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, and Sheriff’s Departments from Boone, Clark, Delaware, Johnson, and Tippecanoe Counties attended the training.

***************************

Indiana State Trooper Tyler Utterback

Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Officer

Completes Photogrammetry Training

Indianapolis---Indiana State Trooper Tyler Utterback, who is assigned to the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division, recently completed Photogrammetry training school held in Indianapolis June 15th through 19th. Sgt. Utterback has previously graduated from crash reconstruction school and this training will enhance his efforts in the field of crash reconstruction in serious or fatal crashes.

Photogrammetry is a computer based program that utilizes integrated digital photography with a specialized software program that allows the creation of scale diagrams of crash or crime scenes that are accurate to within 1/8th of an inch. By comparison, a fatal crash scene may take several hours for investigators to collect evidence and measurements to prepare a scale diagram utilizing traditional historical methods. Now, with Photogrammetry, the same crash scene can be documented in a fraction of the time, sometimes less than 30 minutes. The officers receiving this training are assigned to areas along the I-69 corridor from the Indiana-Michigan state line to Indianapolis and I-65 from Chicago to Louisville. The goal in the use of this new technology is to cut the crash investigation time to allow the roadways to be cleared and opened quicker which equates to less delay time for the motoring public.

The stimulus for this training has been the Indiana Traffic Incident Management Effort or IN-TIME. IN-TIME is a host of Indiana agencies dedicated to safer and more expedient traffic flow. The goal of IN-TIME is to cut the time roadways are shut down due to the response and investigation of major and even minor traffic incidents. Through grants provided by the Indiana Department of Transportation, Indiana Department of Revenue Motor Carrier Services, the Indiana Toll Road, and the Federal Highway Administration, funds have been provided to train and equip 22 officers around the state.

Sixteen State Troopers were joined in the training by officers from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department. A total of five sheriff’s departments were also represented: Clark County, Johnson County, Tippecanoe County, Boone County, and Delaware County.

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Indiana State Police

12th Annual Investigation Division Golf Outing

June 23, 2009

Media Advisory

*********

Pendleton Trooper Completes Photogrammetry Training

(Speeds Crash Investigations)

Trooper Scott P. Keegan

PENDLETON---Indiana State Trooper Scott Keegan of the Pendleton Post graduated from Photogrammetry training school held in Indianapolis on June 19th. 

Trooper Keegan had previously graduated from crash reconstructionists school and this training will enhance his efforts in the field of crash reconstruction in serious or fatal crashes.

Photogrammetry is a computer based program that utilizes integrated digital photography with a specialized software program that allows the creation of scale diagrams of crash or crime scenes that are accurate to within 1/8th of an inch. 

By comparison, a fatal crash scene may take several hours for investigators to collect evidence and measurements to prepare a scale diagram utilizing traditional historical methods. 

Now, with Photogrammetry, the same crash scene can be documented in a fraction of the time, sometimes less than 30 minutes.

The officers receiving this training are assigned to areas along the I-69 corridor from the Indiana-Michigan state line to Indianapolis and I-65 from Chicago to Louisville.

The goal in the use of this new technology is to cut the crash investigation time to allow the roadways to be cleared and opened quicker which equates to less delay time for the motoring public.

June 22, 2009

Marker honors fallen ISP officer

Trooper William R. Rayner remembered

    “Trooper William Rayner Memorial Highway”

MILAN---The official announcement designating a portion of Interstate 74 near mile marker 138 as the “Trooper William Rayner Memorial Highway” was made on the Decatur County Courthouse steps on Monday, June 8 by State Representative Cleo Duncan.

 “It is my honor to present this,” Duncan told the family of the slain officer as they gathered. She said it was an overdue honor, a long-awaited one that she was proud to be a part of. “I am humbled to be a part of remembering Trooper Rayner, who was a loyal public servant that made the ultimate sacrifice.”

Duncan, along with representatives Scott Reske and Vern Tincher, introduced Resolution No. 13 with State Senators Jean Leising and Johnny Nugent, sponsoring the resolution. It was adopted on January 27 of this year during the first regular session of the 116th General Assembly.

The marker has been erected as a permanent tribute to Rayner, who was killed December 18, 1966 during a routine traffic stop in Decatur County.

That night changed the lives of many people. Instead of making plans for Christmas, a young widow found herself making plans for her husband’s funeral. Rayner’s wife, Rheadawn, was left to raise three children, ages 5, 7 months. and one on the way, according to Ripley Publishing Co. files.

Rheadawn spoke at the event on Monday, saying her husband was a great man. Surrounded by family members, she said, “Even though we’ve had tragedy, we’ve got a great family.” She thanked everyone for coming, and in her typical gracious style did not dwell on the past, but instead focused on others who made the honor possible. She thanked Rep. Duncan and the two shared a hug.

As officers do every day, Trooper Rayner stopped a car that fateful night for running without taillights. What happened next would shock the law enforcement community. A gun battle ensued with Rayner being fatally wounded. They would later find out that the car was stolen, and the two inside were escapees from a Kentucky detention facility. Both had extensive criminal records.

Having graduated from Milan High School in 1954, Rayner had been an Indiana State Trooper for eight years, assigned to the Versailles Post. Those who had the privilege of working with him were devastated with the news. Hugh Chambers, now retired from the Indiana State Police, was close to Rayner and his family. He told The Versailles Republican he was in Terre Haute when he received the call. “I don’t remember that long drive back,” he noted, recalling how he started for home.

Retired Trooper Noel Houze Sr. said he “practically lived with them" (the Rayner family) while in training. He said his fellow trooper, Rayner, and mentor was a man of honor. Retired State Police Detective John Mann shared memories of that “cold night that changed everybody’s lives forever” describing Rayner as a “wonderful” trooper - “elite.”

Saying the death of Trooper Rayner was one of the hardest things they’ve ever dealt with, officers said guys like the fallen trooper made the Versailles Post the best in the State. They even shared some humor about him, saying his nick name was “Prince.” His widow agreed, saying, “He was my Prince.”

Trooper Rayner was the 19th Indiana State Trooper to be killed in the line of duty. Norman Huelson was the commander of the Versailles State Police Post at the time and described Rayner as a “devoted and outstanding police officer.”

The resolution reads in part: “Trooper William R. Rayner is an American hero who gave his life in service to our state and country and deserves special recognition."

That statement was echoed by officers attending the ceremony held Monday.

The Greensburg officer in the above photo is Dennis Blodgett. 

It was his father, Deputy Junior Blodgett, who was riding with Bill Rayner the night he was killed. 

Dep. Blodgett shot and killed Rayner’s assailant while another suspect got away

but, as you know, was captured the next day by John Mull and Carl Wood. 

**************************

Fallen Indiana State Trooper Andrew P. Winzenread

Given Lasting Memorial

“Trooper Andrew P. Winzenread Memorial Highway.”

Pictured left to right

Cleo Duncan

Winzenread's widow Cindy Winzenread

their daughter Taylor Winzenread

his mother Sharon Winzenread

Sgt. Noel Houze

GREENSBURG---A large crowd gathered at the Decatur County Courthouse on Friday, in the midst of the downtown Greensburg Sesquicentennial celebration.

 Their mission was not to take part in the festivities, however. Rather, they had convened to honor and remember the sacrifice made by Indiana State Police Tpr. Andrew P. Winzenread.

On April 25, 1997, Tpr. Winzenread was struck and killed by a semi-tractor trailer that had passed too closely on Interstate 74. According to ISP Sgt. Noel Houze, Winzenread went to assist a stranded motorist by himself. He could have called for help, Houze explained, but chose to go alone. Houze was Winzenread’s squad sergeant, who rode with him the day he was killed.

On Friday, State Rep. Cleo Duncan led the group inside the courthouse to commemorate Winzenread’s sacrifice with a memorial marker on Interstate 74, which renamed the stretch of road along mile marker 144 the “Trooper Andrew P. Winzenread Memorial Highway.” Winzenread’s daughter Taylor, his widow Cindy Winzenread and his mother Sharon Winzenread attended the ceremony.

At the ceremony, Duncan passed on the duties of reading the proclamation from the state government to Houze, because she was worried she wouldn’t be able to get through it without crying.

Sharon Winzenread explained that, through all of the support for her family, she has been overwhelmed.

“Andrew loved his job and loved people,” Cindy Winzenread said.

She noted that he is still touching lives, through things like the annual golf tournament that raises funds for the Andrew P. Winzenread Scholarship.

Following the tragedy of Winzenread’s death, Houze approached Duncan and asked if there was something that could be done. They worked together and Duncan developed the Slow Down/Move Over legislation that was created in 1999.

“Last year, all 50 states adopted Indiana’s law,” Duncan explained with a tear in her eye.

Houze, who has been with the ISP for 25 years, said there was something good that came out of the tragedy.

“We don’t know how many lives that might have been saved as a result of Andy’s sacrifice,” he said.

Winzenread’s death, Houze added, was something that has stuck with him throughout his career.

“This tragedy also changed the lives of those who knew Andy,” he said.

Motorists driving past mile marker 144 on I-74 will now notice the blue plaque indicating it is the “Tpr. Andrew P. Winzenread Memorial Highway,” commemorating Winzenread’s sacrifice.

“Trooper Winzenread’s actions displayed his willingness to go the extra mile and to help people wherever he had the opportunity,” she said.

“He was a shining example of all the good qualities exhibited by Indiana State Troopers, and he truly lived by the guiding values of the Indiana State Police — integrity, service and professionalism.”

Courtesy Greensburg Daily News

June 20, 2009

Invitation to join

American Association of State Troopers

Attention ISP Retirees:

I just returned from the 2009 annual board meeting of the American Association of State Troopers held in Las Vegas.  While this year’s agenda was relatively small with no real drastic changes, there was one proposed change to the by-laws that did pass.  While retired troopers are eligible to join AAST, effective January 1, 2010 a retired trooper must join the association within one year of retirement.  This proposal was introduced by AAST Executive Director, Ken Howes.  The reason for this proposal was strictly from a  financial standpoint.  The current membership of the association as of March 31, 2009 is made up of over 65% retirees.  Many retirees join primarily for the insurance benefits which includes a life insurance benefit of $7500 and an additional $7500 if the death is accidental.  With our membership consisting primarily of “older” members, this results in higher costs to maintain the benefit.  Our current insurance contract is in place until October, 2011 after which we will have to negotiate a new contract.  As the age demographic increases, this means our costs for maintaining this benefit will increase.  The only way to maintain an affordable policy is to lower the average age of our membership.  We all need to go out and recruit younger (active) state troopers to join and, unfortunately, we need to put a mechanism in place to keep those who have been retired for many years and are getting much older from joining.

As the Indiana Director I thought it was my duty to make all of you aware of this so if you have considered joining AAST,  and if you retired prior to January 1, 2009, you must join before January 1, 2010.  If you are an ISP retiree and are a current member of AAST, you need to make sure to keep your membership current.  If you allow your membership to lapse, you will not be able to re-join.

I encourage all of you to visit the American Association of State Troopers website at www.statetroopers.org.  Applications for membership can be downloaded from the site and all you have to do is fill it out and attach a copy of your ISP retirement identification along with a check for $30 to become a member.  Membership runs from the date you join for one year.  In other words, if you join July 1, 2009 your membership is good through June 30, 2010.

If any of you have any questions about this, please feel free to contact me at nhouze@comcast.net or phone me at home at (812) 654-3863 or on my cell at (812) 569-5264.

Noel Houze, Jr.

American Association of State Troopers

Indiana State Director

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INDIANA CONSERVATION OFFICER K9 “TANK”

10-0 DUE TO TERMINAL ILLNESS

K9 “Tank” and Indiana Conservation Officer Justin Blake

Indiana Conservation Officer K9 “Tank” passed away on June 18, 2009 due to a serious medical condition.

Tank and his handler, Indiana Conservation Officer Justin Blake, were involved in numerous investigations involving wild game detection, evidence recovery, and man tracking.

They also attended many public appearances at schools, churches, conservation clubs, 4-H and Scout groups, informing the public of the duties of an Indiana Conservation Officer and the role a K9 plays in assisting in investigations.

Tank was a Chesapeake Bay Retriever and was 4 years old at the time of his death. He will be truly missed.

Email: rclear@dnr.in.gov

June 18, 2009

The appeal process continues for the killer of Sgt. Dan R. Starnes

From: Janice Marie Starnes [mailto:jan_star29@hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2009 8:06 PM
Subject: Sgt. Dan R. Starnes

Hello everyone,  Sgt. Dan R. Starnes, my husband, and father of  Dustin and Ryan Starnes, was shot in the line of duty on June 14, 2001, along with our son Ryan, who was slightly injured.  Dan died from his injuries on July 10, 2001.  The offender, tom pruitt received a sentence of death. An execution date has been set for September 8, 2009. The Attorney Generals Office notifed me yesterday afternoon. Also, note below the information I received from the Morgan Co Prosecutor.
 
Although the execution date has been set again, many more appeals are forthcoming.The defense is in the process of filing for a stay of execution

The Indiana Supreme Court denied Tommy Ray Pruitt's petition for rehearing and, as is customary at the conclusion of state post-conviction review, set a date for Pruitt's execution.  Pruitt stands convicted of and sentenced to death for the 2001 Morgan County murder of Deputy Sheriff Dan Starnes.  Details of this case can be found here.  The Indiana Supreme Court had previously affirmed the denial of post-conviction relief on March 31, 2009.  Today, the court issued a brief opinion addressing one aspect of Pruitt's claim of ineffective assistance of counsel that had been overlooked in the original opinion and otherwise denied the petition for rehearing.  That opinion is available here.  DAG Jim Martin represented the State in this appeal.
 
Additionally, by separate order, the court set September 8, 2009, as the date for the execution of Pruitt's sentence.  However, Pruitt still has federal habeas corpus review available to him and, if Pruitt so requests, a federal court is expected to stay this order in due course.
 
Pruitt may also seek review by the U.S. Supreme Court and has 90 days within which to do so. 

Thank you all for your continued support.
Janice Starnes

June 17, 2009

Indiana state trooper resigns after facebook controversy

INDIANAPOLIS---A state trooper at the center of a controversy regarding his Facebook profile has resigned.

Police said Wednesday that ISP Superintendent Paul Whitesell accepted the resignation of Trooper Christopher Petow.

The trooper chose to resign prior to Whitesell entering a final finding and order on an internal investigation, an ISP release stated.

Pestow was investigated on four violations of conduct unbecoming an officer, one violation of department policy and one violation of improper use of department equipment.

He had been assigned to administrative duties since the violations came to light.

Those violations were brought forward by a 13 Investigates report that showed photos Pestow posted on his Facebook page, including one of an IMPD officer holding a gun to his head in a joking manner.

There were also questions about Pestow updating his status on Facebook while on duty.

Story courtesy WTHR.com

****************************

2009 David Deuter Memorial 5th Grade Essay Contest Winners

Since mid January hundreds of Indiana 5th graders have been anxiously awaiting the announcement of the winners of the 2009 David Deuter Memorial Essay Contest.  These 5th graders composed an original essay, in approximately 100 words, on the subject "What Being a Good Citizen Means to Me".

Invitations were sent to all Indiana elementary schools challenging their 5th graders to enter their school’s essay contest.  One winner was selected from each of Indiana’s participating counties.  In 2009, 89 of the 92 counties had schools participating in the contest. Local troopers presented a certificate to the county winners at their school's end of year programs

Left to right in Photo Sarah Hannon (Betsy's Mother)

Betsy Hannon of Sullivan Elementary, the Sullivan County winner

and also the statewide winner

Presented by Sgt. Tom Hannon

Hanna Barnett of Staunton Elementary, the Clay County winner

Present by Sgt. Watts

Mikaela Fish of Hoosier Prairie Elementary, the Vigo County winner

Present by Sgt. Watts

**************

Julian Wharton of North Vermillion Elementary, the Vermillion County winner

Rachel Grayless of Turkey Run Elementary, the Parke County winner

Photos not submitted for Vermillion or Parke county winners

The statewide awards ceremony was held in the North Atrium of the Indiana State House on Friday, June 12th.  The statewide winner received a $1,000 US Savings Bond, while the four runners-up received $750 in US Savings Bonds.  The remaining 84 county winners all received a $500 US Savings Bond.  All winners received engraved plaques, Governor’s "You Make A Difference" Certificates, and other gifts compliments of the Indiana Troopers Association.

2009 marks the 13th year the ITA has provided the 5th Grade Essay Contest, distributing thousands of dollars in US Savings Bonds and other gifts to reward students for their efforts in promoting good citizenship across Indiana.

June 16, 2009

Two-Month Investigation and $200 Grand in Cash      

               

                       

St. Joseph County---Monday evening officers with the Indiana State Police, the Elkhart County ICE Unit and the Metro Special Operations Section, raided a suspected drug house in South Bend.  Troopers with the state police Emergency Response Team served the search warrant at 1113 East Donaldson shortly after 8:00 p.m.

The two-month drug investigation that began in Elkhart County ended in South Bend with two arrests and several thousands of dollars in cash and vehicles being seized.  The initial investigation, which was headed by the Elkhart County ICE Unit, eventually evolved into a cooperative effort between state police, ICE, and the Metro Special Operations Section.  Officers recovered powered cocaine and seized more than $200,000 in cash and two vehicles from the residence.  Undercover officers with the state police commented that money was found stashed all over the home from shirt pockets to boxes.  Two young children, ages three and five, and their mother were present at the time of the raid.  All three were released from the scene.

The investigation that took officers from Elkhart to the East Donaldson Street home and Candelario Leon, 30, ended with his arrest at his residence.  Leon will face charges of dealing cocaine, possession of cocaine and maintaining a common nuisance in St. Joseph County.  He is currently incarcerated in the Elkhart County Jail where he will also face charges of conspiracy, racketeering and dealing, which stem from the initial investigation.  Sergio Garcia, 25, of South Bend was also arrested at the scene.  Garcia is being charged with possession of cocaine and visiting a common nuisance in St. Joseph County.  He is currently being held in the St. Joseph County jail.

June 15, 2009

Media Advisory

Trooper Andrew P. Winzenread

killed in the line of duty on April 25, 1997

Who:       Indiana State Police, Indiana Department of Transportation, and Indiana State Representative Cleo Duncan

What:     Dedication Ceremony

Where:   Decatur County Courthouse, Greensburg, IN

When:     Friday, June 19 at 1 p.m.

Why:       To dedicate a memorial marker in memory of Indiana State Trooper Andrew P. Winzenread, killed in the line of duty on April 25, 1997.

Media note:         Media should plan to arrive at least 15 minutes prior to the ceremony.  Weather permitting, the ceremony will be held outside on the east side of the courthouse.  If weather is inclement, the ceremony will be held inside the courthouse.

June 13, 2009

Updated info on Terre Haute Pursuit

Trooper Ty Lightle  injured in high speed chase

ISP still on the hunt for three suspects

WEST TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA---A trio of suspects is still at large after leading Indiana State Troopers on a high speed chase Friday night with speeds hitting 100 m.p.h.

It started in Vermillion County when a farmer spotted several men stealing anhydrous ammonia, a key ingredient in making methamphetamine.

Troopers chased the car for 19 minutes before the suspect's car crashed into a gate in West Terre Haute intended to keep motorized traffic out of the River Bottoms area.

"The pursuit lasted for quite awhile for a pursuit," Trooper BJ Patterson said. "Fortunately, there was not a lot of traffic on the road, because speeds did reach 100 miles an hour."

Trooper Ty Lightle had minor injuries after his car crashed into the suspect's car and the fence.

He was treated and released from Terre Haute Regional Hospital Friday.

Troopers say the three men inside the vehicle ran off and are still at large.

They believe at least one of them is from the West Terre Haute area.

******************************

Three men on the loose; state trooper injured

High speed chase end, anhydrous ammonia in car

WEST TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA---Three unidentified men are on the loose in the Wabash Valley as an Indiana State Police officer is taken to Regional Hospital.

A high speed chase, topping speeds of 100 miles per hour ended Friday night in West Terre Haute on the corner of Cherry Grove and 6th Street.

Indiana State Police said it all began after Vermillion County dispatch received information that anhydrous ammonia had been stolen out of Vermillion County barn in Dana, Ind.

Officers said anhydrous ammonia is a key ingredient for making meth.

ISP began to pursue the car on a high speed chase. It ended in a crash injuring the officer. He was taken to Regional Hospital with minor injuries.

Officers and crews work to clean up the wreck and neutralize the anhydrous ammonia.

Officers encourage people to call Crime Stoppers at 238-STOP if anyone has any information on the three men.

The name of the trooper has not yet been released.

June 11, 2009

Top 20 oldest living ISP retirees

NAME DOB AGE
RAHOLIN, EDWARD J. 06/12/14 95
SUTHERLAND, CHARLES 12/01/14 95
NUTTY, GORDON M. 09/29/15 94
SHEETS, JAMES R. 12/16/16 93
ALLEN, GEORGE W. 02/10/18 91
BROWN, LEWIS W. 02/14/18 91
PETERS, RICHARD B. 08/20/18 91
BUSHORE, GERALD 12/19/18 91
COOK, JOHN A. 03/27/19 90
COX, RAYMOND E. 10/12/19 90
HUELSON, NORMAN 11/22/19 90
LEE, FRED E. 02/19/20 89
GUTH, STANLEY W. 04/28/20 89
PHERAL, JOHN L. 06/03/20 89
HAGEN, HAROLD M. 06/29/20 89
TAGUE, MARION H. 08/01/20 89
MOHR, CARROLL E. 10/12/20 89
HAAS, ROBERT F. 11/16/20 89
MERRILLEES, HAROLD C. 01/18/21 88
VOKOROKOS, JAMES C. 02/18/21 88

*************************************

2009 STEUBEN COUNTY DAVID DEUTER

MEMORIAL ESSAY CONTEST WINNER

Hendry Park Elementary School fifth-grader Hannah McElroy, left, received the Indiana State Troopers Association’s David Deuter Award from Trooper Kody Buell of Angola for her essay on good citizenship during a student assembly Friday afternoon. The award includes a $500 savings bond.

June 10, 2009

E-ticket system a big hit with troopers

1 million E-tickets written in 2years

INDIANAPOLIS---Indiana State Police say they have issued one million tickets over two years on Indiana highways using the E-ticket system. Officers said they can issue a ticket in a matter of minutes, which makes the roads a lot safer.

The high-tech tool has state troopers buzzing.

"It really has helped us out a lot," said Trooper Adam Buell. "It's a great system. It allows us to conduct a traffic stop a lot quicker," Trooper Buell said.

Officers obtain all of a driver's information in one simple step.

They use the device to scan the barcode on the back of a driver's license, which eliminates the time and paperwork of writing down the information.

"A traffic stop was a lot longer. It required you to write a hand-written ticket that had five carbon copies," said Trooper Buell.

In District 52, which includes Boone, Marion, Johnson and Shelby counties, troopers have averaged 62,000 E-tickets a year.

24-Hour News was there when Trooper Buell issued his 685th E-ticket. He pulled over Amy Radford of Indianapolis for a seatbelt violation.

"It's quick," Radford said of the E-ticket system. "I just got in the car to go to work and I forgot to put (the seatbelt) on, but I don't like wearing it."

Trooper Buell said the E-ticket system doesn't cover all inconveniences.

"If somebody doesn't have their driver's license or their registration information with them, it does make us have to sit here and type everything out," said Trooper Buell.

The E-ticket system not only scans a driver's license, but a vehicle's registration as well. The information is then put in the officer's computer and sent downtown for processing.

Courtesy WISH-TV

June 09, 2009

Indiana State Police Oldest Retiree Turns 95

Retired Lt. Ed Raholin, PE 19 will be 95 on Friday, June 12, 2009.

    Retired Lt. Ed Raholin, PE 19 will be 95 on Friday, June 12, 2009.   Raholin served the ISP for 32 years in a number of capacities.  He now resides in an Elkhart Retirement Center.  If you would care to send he and his family a card, the address is:  Hubbard Hill Retirement Community, Health Care Unit, Room 2417, 28070 CR 24 W, Elkhart, IN  47517.

***************************

Update on Aubrey Anderson

daughter of Trooper Caleb Anderson

follow her journal at the website underlined below

The saying is “Bald is beautiful” and in Aubrey’s case, it definitely is.  I would be lucky to be ½ as beautiful as she is – she’s absolutely radiant!  Over the weekend she lost almost all of her hair, but her bravery as she faces this new change continues to amaze us all.  Over the course of the last 5 months we’ve been stripped of many of the things we might possibly put pride in and we’ve realized all that we actually have.  3 incredible children – all uniquely special, a great and loving family, and one of the most incredible support systems     - I honestly don’t think it could get any better than this (in our situation).  Thank you God – we feel truly blessed! 

 Last night as I rocked Aubrey before bed, I realized she had gone to sleep in my lap (she usually asks to be put in bed before she falls asleep, but last night she was especially tired).  I decided to take advantage of it and rock her a little longer - Caleb had the other kids quiet and happy.  My lips kissed her warm, soft head as my tears rolled across it, now perfectly smooth.  I couldn’t believe how quickly the transformation had happened.  “Hair today gone tomorrow” practically.  Friday : full head of hair – Monday : all gone but a few stray pieces.  Unbelievable, heartbreaking, overwhelming, but somehow joyful and exciting!?  Our little princess has proven to us over and over that she has the strength of 10 armies. 

Friday night, the first night of her major hair-loss, Aubrey left a bag of her hair beside her pillow and the “hair fairy” visited her just as she has every night since.  Tonight will be the last night of the “hair fairy”, well, because Aubrey is out of hair, but she has enjoyed the experience and loves the surprises that the fairy has left her.

Today I showed Aubrey the wig that my sister and other relatives had made for her and her expression when she saw it was priceless…she loves “her hair” to say the least and it fits perfect!  She feels comfortable without it, but loves the feeling when she is wearing it – when she put it on for the first time she looked at me enthusiastically and said, “Mommy look, now I can have hair!”  -tearjerker! 

I, personally, am still wrapped up in Aubrey’s excitement with her new milestone (most of the time), but Caleb has taken the “hair thing” pretty tough.  He has definitely had a few “moments” the last few days…it’s without a doubt difficult to watch a 3 year old girl experience…especially your very own daughter.

Thanks once again to all of you that read this faithfully…it means so much to us. 

~Ashley

******************************

ISP Pension Fund wins at Supreme Court (for now)

Ruth Bader Ginsberg granted a temporary stay of the Fiat/Chrysler deal in favor of the ISP and other state pension funds yesterday.

click here to see initial Supreme Court ruling

*******************************

2009 DAVID DEUTER MEMORIAL ESSAY CONTEST

STATEWIDE AWARDS PROGRAM

WHEN: FRIDAY, JUNE 12, 2009

TIME: 1PM

WHERE: INDIANA STATE HOUSE - NORTH ARTIUM

This is the 13th year for the Essay Program and the 9th year that we have held the Statewide Awards Program at the State House.

This year 89 out of 92 Indiana Counties participated in the essay contest and all of those county winners, their families and school officials have been invited to join us for the program.

Winners composed an original essay on the subject, "What Being a Good Citizen Means To Me".

The statewide winner is from Sullivan County and the Runners-Up are from: Warrick, Jay, Daviess and LaGrange Counties. All County winners will receive savings bonds and other gifts from the ITA.

Guest speakers for the program will include: Indiana First Lady Cheri Daniels; Dr. Tony Bennett, Supt. of Public Instruction; Dr. Paul Whitesell, Supt. of Indiana State Police and ITA President Pat Warczynski and Executive Director Ernie Alder. A special program by Amazon John of Silly Safari will complete the program.

All troopers and their families are welcome to attend this program.

*******************************

Master Trooper Michael Barman to retire after 30 years

Fort Wayne---As a rookie in 1979, Michael Barman’s childhood dream of becoming an Indiana State Trooper became a reality, with one of his first incidents serving as a grim reminder of his duties.

Barman and his wife Becky were driving home after visiting family in Marion when he saw cars pulled over and a young boy lying on the ground of Interstate 69. Barman, not far enough in training to have a police car, turned his own vehicle around in the median and came back to the scene.

He arrived to find a 4-year-old boy who was hit by a car after he followed his father across the highway.

Barman performed CPR on the dying boy, but it was too late.

“He didn’t make it,” Barman said, “but that was the very first incident as a police officer that I had to deal with someone that young, and it gave me general perspective of the life and career I was getting into.”

Today, Master Trooper Barman, 59, is celebrating his 30th year as an Indiana State Police Officer at the Fort Wayne post and continues serving and protecting the public as a Traffic Trooper.

“I enjoy working the road,” Barman said. “I enjoy being out there with the public, I enjoy the visibility, I enjoy the hands-on atmosphere.”

Barman began his stint with the Indiana State Police on April 15, 1979, at the age of 29 when he graduated from the 36th Indiana State Police Recruit Academy. He was assigned to the Fort Wayne post and has been here ever since.

“A lot has changed from 30 years ago,” Barman said. “A lot of the procedures have changed, and a lot of laws have, too. The Indiana State Police have taken a lot into professionalism and integrity and how you present yourself to the public. How you present yourself is very important.”

Barman has not always prided himself on professionalism and integrity like he does today.

Before joining the Fort Wayne post, he failed out of Ball State University before joining the Army during the Vietnam War.

“I had a lot of maturing and a lot of growing up to do, so I joined the military,” Barman said.

During his two years in the military, Barman was stationed in Korea and became a supply sergeant.

“I enjoyed what I did in the military. The funny thing is, I didn’t like being in uniform and having short hair. Look at me now,” Barman said.

He returned to Indiana after his military service and graduated from Ball State University with a bachelor’s degree in education and later earned his master’s in special education.

“I’ve had two goals in my life,” Barman said. “One was to work with mentally handicapped children, and the second was law enforcement, in particular the Indiana State Police.”

Barman worked with people with psychological problems for three years before joining the Fort Wayne post.

“Mentally handicapped children and dealing with young kids will always have a part of me,” he said. “The State Police is right there with it.”

Master Trooper Barman will retire on July 31, 2010, and his experience will be missed.

“We lose 30 years of experience and knowledge,” Public Information Officer Sergeant Ron Galaviz said. “That’s hard to replace. Mike is a solid trooper, and he prides himself on being out on the road. We will all miss him.”

Barman plans to continue working in law enforcement as a security guard at Ivy Tech Community College, riding his two Harley Davidson Motorcycles, and spending time with his wife, Becky, and his son, Justin.

June 08, 2009

2009 David Deuter Memorial 5th Grade Essay Contest Winners

for Jackson and Jennings Counties

Since mid January hundreds of Indiana 5th graders have been anxiously awaiting the announcement of the winners of the 2009 David Deuter Memorial Essay Contest.  These 5th graders composed an original essay, in approximately 100 words, on the subject "What Being a Good Citizen Means to Me".

Invitations were sent to all Indiana elementary schools challenging their 5th graders to enter their school’s essay contest.  One winner was selected from each of Indiana’s participating counties.  In 2009, 89 of the 92 counties had schools participating in the contest. Local troopers presented a certificate to the county winners at their school's end of year programs

Louisa Carter was Jackson County’s winner

Louisa Carter was Jackson County’s winner. She attends St. Ambrose Catholic School in Seymour. Trooper Andrew Forgey presented the certificate.

Justine Cory was Jennings County’s winner

Justine Cory was Jennings County’s winner. She attends Scipio Elementary School in Scipio Indiana.  Senior Trooper Gary Thalls presented the certificate.

The statewide awards ceremony will be held in the North Atrium of the Indiana State House on Friday, June 12th.  The statewide winner will receive a $1,000 US Savings Bond, while the four runners-up will receive $750 in US Savings Bonds.  The remaining 84 county winners will all receive a $500 US Savings Bond.  All winners will receive engraved plaques, Governor’s "You Make A Difference" Certificates, and other gifts compliments of the Indiana Troopers Association.

2009 marks the 13th year the ITA has provided the 5th Grade Essay Contest, distributing thousands of dollars in US Savings Bonds and other gifts to reward students for their efforts in promoting good citizenship across Indiana.

June 07, 2009

Ralph Taylor spent 30 years as an

Indiana Department of Natural Resources conservation officer

 ANGOLA, INDIANA---It’s unlikely that many people have wedded their passion and their job as successfully as Ralph Taylor.

Taylor, who spent 30 years as an Indiana Department of Natural Resources conservation officer, passed away May 11. Upon retirement, Taylor held the rank of lieutenant with the DNR’s Division of Law Enforcement, heading up District 2 that covers northeast Indiana.

Taylor’s wife Cheryl said it was sometimes hard to make people understand just how much her husband loved the outdoors.

“He lived and breathed the outdoors,” Cheryl said. “He understood how nature worked, the ebbs and flows and the seasons. He was always happiest when he was out there and he could bring that and capture that for everybody.”

She told the story of a friend who was not a hunter.

“Ralph told her ‘We’re getting up tomorrow and hunting squirrels, with a camera.’ So they went out at about 4:30 a.m. and she told him ‘I don’t see any squirrels.’ So he made a little call and all of a sudden the squirrels were all over. He did that for me on our first date.

We were canoeing down the Pigeon River and there was a deer nearby and he called that deer in.

He just resonated with nature and resonated with people.”

Taylor’s colleagues said there were few men better suited for a position. Scott Charters, of Jimmerson Lake served with Taylor as a conservation officer for 30 years.

“He enjoyed the outdoors and doing the work of a conservation officer,” Charters said. “He relished the public relations part of the job.”

He pointed to the “Be an Outdoors Woman” campaign as an example.

“He enjoyed getting in front of all those ladies and teaching them about the outdoors.

He especially relished teaching them fishing. That’s what he seemed to enjoy most, teaching people how to hunt, fish to be a part of the outdoors,” Charters said.

Cheryl said Taylor’s devotion to the program was born out of what he saw as a rise in women deciding what activities children would be doing.

“He was one of the first people to recognize that with more single mothers you’d have more mothers determining recreational activities for their kids. It became important to teach those women about the opportunities in the outdoors,” she said.

Taylor developed another program, the “Drive Alive” campaign after he retired from the DNR and became an Allen County deputy coroner, she said.

“He was a data guy, and when he worked for the coroner’s office he came up with information that showed a large number of deaths involving kids with drinking and drug issues. The program was developed as a response. It’s focus was on the parents, to give them the tools they needed.”

Paul Greenwalt met Taylor in his role as deputy director of the DNR.

“I first got to know Ralph professionally in the early-’70s, and then we became very close friends,” Greenwalt said.

He soon became a part of a group of close knit friends who traveled across the country fishing.

“There was a core group that fished together every year and a group of guys who’d come up in the fall. We’d go up to Canada, the Great Lakes, the Ozarks,” he said.

When Greenwalt moved to Steuben County, he bought a property across from Taylor’s near Fox Lake, where Taylor had a small farm where he planted wild flowers and other plants.

“We really became very tight. We’d spend a lot of hours and a large amount of time working on that field.” Greenwalt said his friend was “larger than life. He was the consummate outdoors man.”

“The Farm,” as Taylor and his friends referred to it, was really an old cattle yard, said Phil Bloom, who currently is director of communications with the DNR. “He called it his place for his friends to have an opportunity to hunt and to enjoy nature.”

During the last years of his life Taylor definitely got into wildflowers, Greenwalt said. “He became a self-made expert on the subject.”

Taylor, Bloom said, had a unique ability to instill confidence in those he worked with

“In terms of him as a teacher/mentor, he had a unique ability for instilling confidence in a person, that they could do things they hadn’t done before.” This extended, he said, beyond nature. “If it was how to do drywall, how to weld metal, he gave you confidence you could do it.”

Bloom also praised his friend for his work on the Indiana Lakes Management Work Group, which Taylor first became involved with while at the DNR, and then as a representative of the Indiana Sportsman’s Round Table.

“He was a real leader in keeping the group focused on the big picture,” Bloom said.

June 05, 2009

AUTHORITIES SEIZE MARIJUANA SHIPMENT

Tyrone Brown arrested

Kokomo---A joint investigation conducted by Howard County Sheriff Deputies and Indiana State Police drug investigators Thursday resulted in the seizure of two pounds of marijuana and the arrest of a local man.  Tyrone Brown, 52, of the 100 block of S. Faulkner Street, faces a class D felony charge of dealing in marijuana in excess of 30 grams.  The investigation began Thursday morning after a local shipping company reported a suspicious package at their facility.  Narcotics detection K-9 “Rudy” and his handler Deputy Mike Ogle examined the box.  Rudy “indicated” on the suspicious package, and detectives obtained a search warrant to examine the package contents.  “The package was found to contain a large amount of marijuana that was to be delivered to a local residence,” said Sheriff’s Detective Matt Roberson.  Deputies and Indiana State Police conducted a controlled delivery of the marijuana, resulting in Brown’s arrest shortly before 5:30 p.m.  “This investigation is continuing,” said Deputy Matt Roberson, who conducts narcotics investigations for the Sheriff’s Department.  “Obviously you have somebody on the other end of this shipment that you want to identify.”  Anyone with information about this case is asked to contact Deputy Roberson at (765) 456-2020 ext. 224, or the Indiana State Police Peru Post at (800) 382-0689.

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Seymour Troopers Finish Second in Putnamville Pistol Match

The Indiana State Police held the annual Putnamville Intra-Departmental Pistol Match at the Putnamville State Police Post on June 2, 2009.

The annual pistol match promotes exceptional marksmanship among department members and has been conducted for decades. Participants are comprised of top pistol shooters from each of the eighteen (18) state police districts and a team from headquarters personnel. Troopers compete individually and on a four person team made up of troopers from their district. The team representing the Seymour District came in 2nd out of the 19 teams and three troopers from Seymour were recognized as one of the top 20 individual shooters.

The Seymour District team was represented this year by:

First Sergeant Dave Travis, a 18 year member of the Indiana State Police (Finished 8th in Top 20)

Trooper Brent Lykins, a 3 year member of the Indiana State Police (Finished 11th in Top 20)

Trooper Jarrod Black, a 3 year member of the Indiana State Police (Finished 15th in Top 20)

Trooper Christopher Clancy, a 6 year member of the Indiana State Police

Each trooper shoots the competition with their department issued Glock Model 17, 9 millimeter pistol.

The competition consisted of three stages of fire, all one handed shooting, from the 25 yard line. Each stage of fire consists of 10 rounds shot in a specified time. The allotted time decreases at each stage. The maximum possible score is 300 points with each round of ammunition being worth 10 points.

The course of fire is:

Each trooper shoots the course twice, and their accumulative score is totaled for the ranking of the top twenty shooters. Each team’s individual score is also totaled for the team score.

Awards are presented to the top team and the top individual shooter. The top 20 individual shooters are also recognized.

June 04, 2009

The Indiana State Police Lowell District pistol team places first at match

LOWELL ---The Indiana State Police Lowell District pistol team placed first out of 19 teams in the Indiana State Police annual pistol match Monday at the Putnamville District.

The Lowell District has placed first nine times out of the last 11 years. Four people from each district and headquarters participated.

Representing the Lowell District were:

• First Sgt. Tim Isenberg, 48, a 15-year veteran of the department. He is assigned to the Office of Professional Standards. He lives in Porter County with his family.

• Master Trooper Scott Balch, 42, an 18-year veteran of the department. He works Newton and Jasper counties and lives in Jasper County with his family.

• Senior Trooper Chad Maxwell, 39, a 12-year veteran of the department. He is assigned to the Operations Support Division. He lives in Jasper County with his family.

• Senior Trooper Doug Parker, 37, a 14-year veteran of the department. He works Pulaski and Starke counties and lives in Starke County with his family.

Awards were presented to the top team and top individual shooter. The Top 20 individual shooters also were recognized. Isenberg placed third overall, Balch placed 14th, Parker placed 16th and Maxwell placed 19th.

The competition started in 1946 and has been held almost every year since.

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Driver Faces Several Charges after Drunk Driving Car Crash

Drivers Wife arrested later

Three Year Old Daughter saved by car seat

Greenfield---The Indiana State Police, Pendleton Post, responded to a call of a crash at 5:53 p.m. last night on U.S. 40 at 400 west in Hancock County.  Upon arrival Indiana State Trooper Bryce Filson found one of the drivers involved in the crash, Derrick Vickers, unloading a Beretta 9 mm handgun in his vehicle.  Trooper Filson stated Derrick Vickers, 26, Knightstown was driving his 2000 Chevrolet SUV west bound on U.S. 40 in Hancock County near 400 west when he rear-ended a Dodge Dakota pick up truck driven by Gerald Bishop of Indianapolis. Bishop was not injured. The impact sent Vickers vehicle rolling over twice and coming back upright off the north side of U.S. 40.  Vickers three year old daughter Avie Vickers was in a child restraint seat in the rear of the vehicle and miraculously was not injured.  Trooper Filson stated, “If it had been for the child being restrained in a car seat we would be talking about a fatal crash tonight.”

Trooper Filson transported Derrick Vickers to Hancock Memorial Hospital for a blood draw after Trooper Filson noticed the smell of alcohol emanating from Vickers.  A subsequent blood draw revealed Vickers was over the legal limit.  Vickers daughter, Avie Vickers, was transported to the hospital via ambulance for a check out and it was determined she was not injured.  Trooper Filson stated that at approximately 10 p.m. Chastity Linville, 26, Knightstown, Avie Vickers mother, arrived at Hancock County hospital to pick up her daughter.  Trooper Filson stated Linville arrived and was found to be intoxicated and she was arrested for public intoxication.

Arrested and Charged

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Third Annual Fallen Officers Blood Drive

Pendleton District---The third annual fallen officer’s blood drive will be held not only in the Pendleton District, but throughout the state this month. On July 10, 2001, Sergeant Dan R. Starnes of the Morgan County Sheriff’s Department lost his life as a result of gunshot wounds sustained during a line of duty gun battle with a burglary suspect four weeks earlier.  To keep his legacy alive his surviving spouse Janice organized the Sergeant Dan R. Starnes Memorial Blood Drive in Morgan County later that year and has organized a blood drive each year since then in Dan’s memory.  In 2007 she decided to take the blood drive statewide and renamed it the Indiana Fallen Officers Blood Drive.  Janice Starnes set a goal of collecting 1,500 units blood and that goal was shattered when over 5,000 units were collected. All 92 Indiana counties have agreed to participate this year.

Indiana Blood Donation Facts:

The Pendleton District comprises Hamilton, Madison, and Hancock Counties.  Listed below are dates, times, and locations for the blood drives within Pendleton District.

County

Date

Time

Location

Hamilton

June 8, 2009

10-2 p.m.

Fishers Municipal Building, 1 Municipal Drive, Fishers

Hamilton

Hamilton

June 17, 2009

June 13, 2009

10-2 p.m.

10-2 p.m.

         Carmel Police Department, Civic Square, Carmel

         Westfield Police Department 17535 Dartown Rd

Hancock

June 8, 2009

2-6 p.m.

         Fortville Library, 625 East Broadway, Fortville

Madison

 Hancock

 Madison

June 17, 2009

June 18, 2009

June 11, 2009

10-3 p.m.

1-6 p.m.

4p-8p

         Indiana State Police Post, 9022 S.R.67, Pendleton

         Greenfield Police Department, Main St., Greenfield

         Church of Brethren, 9064 W. Grandview, Pendleton

 

  Give a little in memory of those who gave all.

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Pendleton Troopers Finish Third in Pistol Match

Pendleton – The Indiana State Police held the annual Putnamville Intra-Departmental Pistol Match at the Putnamville State Police Post on June 2, 2009.

The annual match, which has been conducted for several years, is comprised of top pistol shooters from each of the eighteen (18) state police districts and headquarters. Indiana State Troopers compete individually and in teams against each district. Each district is represented by four troopers that form a team for the competition. Members of the Pendleton District team finished 3rd place out of 19 teams.

The Pendleton District team was represented this year by:

Each trooper shoots the competition with their Indiana State Police issued Glock Model 17, 9 millimeter caliber pistol on a twenty-five yard timed course using a bulls-eye target. The course is scored on possible total points of 300. Each round of ammunition is worth 10 points each.

The course of fire is:

Each trooper shoots the course twice, and their accumulative score is totaled for the ranking of the top twenty shooters. Each team’s individual score is also totaled for the team score.

Awards are presented to the top team and the top individual shooter. The top 20 individual shooters are also recognized. Trooper Kendrick Donald placed in the top 20 individual shooters

June 03, 2009

REDKEY TROOPERS FINISH 5th IN PISTOL MATCH

Indiana State Police held the annual Putnamville Intra-Departmental Pistol Match at the Putnamville District on June 2, 2009.

The annual match which has been conducted for decades is comprised of top pistol shooters from each of the eighteen (18) state police districts, and general headquarters that compete individually, and in teams against each district. Most generally, each district is represented by four (4) troopers that form a team for the competition. Members of the Redkey District team finished 5th out of 19 teams.

The Redkey District team was represented this year by:

Each trooper shoots the competition with their Indiana State Police issued Glock Model 17, 9 millimeter caliber pistol on a twenty-five yard timed course using a bulls-eye target. The course is scored on possible total points of 300, which each round of ammunition is worth 10 points each.

The course of fire is:

Each trooper shoots the course twice, and their accumulative score is totaled for the ranking of the top twenty shooters. Each team’s individual score is also totaled for the team score.

Awards are presented to the top team and the top individual shooter. The top 20 individual shooters are also recognized. Master Trooper Alexander placed 2nd overall, and Sergeant Dujmovich placed 12th overall.

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Let's all send Fred a card

Fred Lee PE172

Wanted to let you know that Fred fell last week and fractured his shoulder.
Was in Comm. North and is now in Rehab at

Forum at the Crossing
8505 Woodfield Crossing Blvd.
Indianapolis IN 46240

Will be there at least 6 weeks.

June 02, 2009

Rayner Dedication Ceremony (change)

Late this afternoon I received a call from Representative Cleo Duncan informing me there was a conflict with one of Tpr. Rayner's sons for June 11.  The date for the dedication ceremony for the I-74 memorial marker has been changed to next Monday, June 8 at 10:30 a.m. but will still take place at the Decatur County Courthouse.

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REDKEY DISTRICT MOTOR CARRIER INSPECTORS

PARTICIPATE IN ROADCHECK 2009

The Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division is currently participating in Roadcheck 2009, June 2nd-June 4th. The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) sponsors Roadcheck with participation by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators, Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (Mexico). Roadcheck is the largest targeted enforcement program directed toward commercial motor vehicles in the world with approximately 14 trucks or buses being inspected, on average, every minute in North America during a 72-hour period in early June.

Each year, approximately 10,000 CVSA-certified local, state, provincial and federal inspectors at 1,500 locations across North America perform the truck and bus inspections. Roadcheck is one of a series of activities that occur year round whereby CVSA-certified inspectors conduct compliance, enforcement and educational initiatives targeted at various elements of motor carrier, vehicle, driver and cargo safety and security.

Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division personnel from the Redkey District and officials from the Indiana State Department of Health conducted food safety inspections on commercial motor vehicle transporting perishable food stuffs. These inspections were conducted June 2nd on I-69 at the northbound rest park in Delaware County. The following are the results of those inspections.

Truck violation(s) warnings:                            12                

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Putnamville State Police Post Hosts Annual Firearms Competition

Putnamville---The Indiana State Police annual “bull’s eye pistol match” competition was held at the Putnamville range today. Teams of four troopers and one alternate representing the eighteen districts and General Headquarters shot at bull’s eye targets.

Photos 001 and 002 are of officers firing at the targets

The competition consisted of three stages of fire, all one handed shooting, from the 25 yard line. Each stage of fire consists of 10 rounds shot in a specified time. The allotted time decreases at each stage.

Awards are presented to the top team and the top individual shooter. The top 20 individual shooters are also recognized. Additional competition matches are held and separate awards are presented by the Indiana State Police Alliance and the Rogers Group from Bloomington Indiana.

Award Winners:

1.      Top Shooter- George Smith

2.      Top District Team- Lowell

·        Scott Balch

·        Doug Parker

·        Tim Isenberg

·        Chad Maxwell

3.      Indiana State Police Alliance Award- Chad Dick

4.      Rogers Group Award- Stoney Vann

5.      Top Twenty Shooters (first to twentieth)- George Smith, Jarod Alexander, Tim Isenberg, Jim Hayes, Stoney Vann, Tom Mechling, Eric Williams, Dave Travis, Chip Sunier, Russ Workmeister, Brent Lykins, Tom Dujmovich, Donald Kendrick, Scott Balch, Jared Black, Doug Parker, Dan Zeigler, Eric Downey, Chad Maxwell, Jason Page.

Photo 003 is George Smith (left) receiving the J. Mclean Top Shooter award

from Colonel Danny East.

Photo 004 is George Smith (left) receiving the Jim Miller Top  Shooter Award

from Colonel Bill Miller

Photo 006 is Wayne Flick, president of the Indiana State Police Alliance (left)

presenting an award to Chad Dick

Photo 007 is Rogers Group of Bloomington representative Mark Shake (left)

presenting an award to Stoney Vann.

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Putnamville State Police Post Welcomes New Motorcycle Unit

Putnamville---Recently, Trooper Christopher Harcourt completed training at the Deeley Harley Davidson Motorcycle Officers School in Ontario, Canada. The school is located on the campus of the Ontario Police College in Aylmer, Ontario. The school trains motorcycle officers from all over the United States and Canada. The rigorous two week motorcycle school enhances an officer’s basic motorcycle handling skills through advanced high and low speed maneuvering, highway operation and safety techniques unique to police motorcycle units. The students were required to complete eight separate phases in order to become a certified motorcycle officer.

Trooper Christopher Harcourt

Prior to completing the motorcycle school, Harcourt has worked road patrol duties at the Putnamville and Terre Haute State Police Post.  A ten year veteran of the State Police, Harcourt is now assigned to the Operations Support Division as motorcycle patrol unit (MP). He will work from the Putnamville Post. Motor officers utilize 2009 Harley Davidson Electra Glide Motorcycle’s to patrol Indiana from March 1st through November 30. Harcourt will patrol in a police car during the winter months and inclement weather. The motorcycle is equipped with dual head radar, emergency lighting with siren and a hands free radio system.  

The mission of the motorcycle program is to reduce the number and severity of crashes on Indiana roadways. This is to be accomplished through public education and strict traffic enforcement. The Indiana State Police has identified several primary causation factors related to motor vehicle crashes. They are speeding, operating while intoxicated, disregarding a traffic control device, improper passing, following too closely, unsafe lane movement, and failure to yield. The motorcycle program along with the Indiana State Police high performance Mustang vehicle program is designed to combat such driving behaviors.

The Indiana State Police currently has 25 motorcycle patrol units working from various posts throughout Indiana.

If you would like to speak to Trooper Harcourt about a traffic concern in a specific area where a motor officer could assist, contact him at the Putnamville State Police Post at 1-800-225-8576. 

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ISPA Annual Meeting and Golf Outing:
 
This years outing will be held at:
 
Maple Creek Golf & Country Club
10501 E. 21st Street
Indianapolis, IN  46229
317-894-3343

 
June 8, 2009
11:00am
 

The cost for this years outing is $45and this will include Golf, Cart, Unlimited Range Balls prizes and a meal to be served at the course immediately after the golf is completed.  Maple Creek Golf Course was Pete Dye's first Golf Course that he designed, and Mr. Dye has again been working with the Golf Course to redesign three of the holes. Through the years some of our members have asked us to move our outing out of the month of May so this years outing will be held on June 8th and tee off will be at11:00AM.  We hope that hosting this event in June will allow more of our members to play in this event.  A registration form will be mailed out to our members or you can contact the Alliance office for one of the forms. If you have any other questions please contact the Alliance office.

June 01, 2009

Trooper Joe Trees grave site

following Memorial Services at the Redkey Post

Lt. Nichols and some troopers went to

the grave site and put the Memorial flag up. 

No descriptors provided

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Evansville Area Luncheon

The Evansville Area Retiree’s will be meeting for a Bi Monthly Luncheon on Tuesday, June 2, at 11:00 AM (Evansville Time).  The location is at CJ’s Restaurant, at the Willow Lanes Bowling Alley.  It is located on Virginia Street just east of US 41.  Come join us

May 29, 2009

INTOXICATED DRIVER USES TRACTOR TO PULL CAR

At 6:50 a.m. this morning, Indiana State Police Troopers responded to a report of a farm tractor pulling an inverted passenger car, eastbound on Bluejay Road near Eppert Road in northeastern Vigo County. Troopers arrived minutes later and found the large farm tractor and car had traveled over the west side of a bridge at the intersection of Eppert Road and Bluejay Road. The driver of the farm tractor fled the scene after the crash.

Troopers received a tip that the driver was hiding at a nearby farm house on Rio Grande Road. Officers went to the residence and took the driver into custody without incident. He was identified as Kevin Michael Whitesell, age 31, of Terre Haute, IN. Whitesell was taken to the Vigo County Jail and incarcerated for Driving While Intoxicated, Class A misdemeanor; and Leaving the Scene of a Property Damage Crash, Class C misdemeanor. This is an ongoing investigation and additional charges may be filed.

Preliminary investigation by Master Trooper Todd Miles, found that at approximately 5:00 a.m. this morning, Whitesell had wrecked his 2000 Chevrolet Cavalier on Bluejay Road just west of Eppert Road. He then walked to a farm house on Rio Grande Road, approximately two miles from the scene, and obtained a 1998 John Deere 9100 Series four-wheel driver tractor. Whitesell then drove back to his car on Bluejay, hooked the overturned car to the tractor and began dragging the car (on it’s top) eastbound on Bluejay. As Whitesell attempted to make a right turn onto Eppert, he lost control and drove the tractor over the west side of the bridge, dragging the car with it. The tractor was owned by Plant Farms and the owner of the car was Whitesell.

Vigo County Emergency Management Director Dr. Dorene Hojnicki was on the scene to examine the flowing waters of the north branch of Otter Creek for any fuel or oil loss from the overturned tractor. Her initial assessment was very minimal amounts of fluids were lost and pose no potential threat to the environment.

The bridge sustained minimal structure damage and Vigo County Highway Engineer Neil Costello anticipated the bridge will be partially open this afternoon after temporary supports are in place.

The criminal investigation was handled by ISP Detective Hans Nowak, overturned tractor crash by Master Trooper Todd Miles and the earlier one-car crash by Trooper Chip McKee. They were assisted by other ISP troopers and detectives; Vigo County Sheriff’s Office, Vigo County Office of Emergency Management, Vigo County Highway Engineers Office, Duke Energy, Misco Crane Rental.

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Hanna Barnett wins Dave Deuter essay contest

Staunton Elementary fifth-grader Hanna Barnett was

recognized for winning the Clay County division of the

Indiana State Police Dave Deuter Essay Contest from ISP

Public Information Officer Sgt. Joe Watts Wednesday.


Do you know what it means to be a good citizen? Staunton Elementary fifth-grader Hanna Barnett's thoughts on good citizenship helped her win the 13th annual 2009 Indiana State Police Dave Deuter Essay Contest.

Hanna, the daughter of Amanda and Gregg Barnett, Staunton, was shocked to find out she won during the award ceremony at school Wednesday morning.

"I'm really surprised that I won," the excited 11-year-old told The Brazil Times after receiving a certificate of recognition from ISP Public Information Officer Sgt. Joe Watts. "This is exciting."

Watts said Hanna would join essay winners from the other 91 counties in Indiana later this year at an awards ceremony in Indianapolis, where they each will be presented with an engraved plaque and a $500 US Savings Bond. However, there is more potential for Barnett's essay to be recognized.

"The top four runner-ups will then be announced and presented $750 savings bonds," Watts said. "And then a state winner will be selected, who will receive a $1,000 savings bond."

During the past 13 years, the program has provided more than $350,000 in savings bonds and other awards to fifth-grade students throughout the state.

"This is a great opportunity to build a rapport between our officers and the students," Watts said.

Hanna, who's looking forward to attending North Clay Middle School in the fall, admits to looking a little further into her future.

When asked about a career choice, she said, "I've thought about becoming a police officer."

About the contest

The Indiana State Police Dave Deuter Essay Contest is named in honor of Master Trooper David Deuter who was killed in the line of duty July 16, 1998.

Every January, fifth-grade students in all 92 counties in Indiana are encouraged to write 100-word essays on the topic of "What being a good citizen means to me."

Essays are judged on originality, neatness, spelling and grammar.

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New stripe with familiar old style markings and single bubble light

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Jerry Cliver scheduled to be released from prison on September 15, 2009.

Florida Department of Corrections criminal history

Greetings:  Knowing that some of you worked with Jerry at the time of his incidents we wanted to make sure you knew that he is scheduled to be released from prison on September 15, 2009.  If you know of other people that should know this information please forward it onto them.  Thank you and Be Safe 

cdick@isp.in.gov

May 28, 2009

Sgt. Gregg Wagner, Evansville Post, recovering from knee replacement surgery

Gregg Wagner is recovering from Knee Replacement Surgery, at St. Mary's Hospital in Evansville.  Everything looks well at this point.  He is in room 4205, and up for visits after 4:30PM daily.  Gregg will probably be released on Friday, May 29th.

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Deuter Essay Contest Winners

Sgt Chad D. Dick Jasper PIO is the presenter in each photo

Tyler Burch

Spencer county essay winner

Evan Peabody

Crawford county essay winner

Hailie Estabrook

Dubois county essay winner

Jacob Blackwell

Martin county essay winner

Note to Deb Deuter Speidell from Sgt Chad Dick Jasper Post

    As promised attached are the photographs of the recipients that I presented the award to.  It is a great honor to do these presentations.  When I present these I tell the people in attendance a brief story of Dave and how he showed me first hand what being a good citizen is when we worked together in Zone 4.  I love seeing how excited the kid's faces are when they receive the certificate.  I hope things are going well for you.  Take Care

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Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division Inspection

CVED F/Sgt Mike Addison conducting an inspection

parking lot where the inspections were conducted.

May 26, 2009

May 21, 2009

Memorial service at Seymour District                             

Who:                Indiana State Police Seymour District

What:                The Indiana State Police Seymour District will recognize and honor fallen members of the department in a memorial service. These fallen members gave the ultimate sacrifice- their lives, in the line of duty, protecting and serving the citizens of Indiana.

When:              Thursday, May 21st, 2009 at 11:00 a.m.

Where:             The service will take place at the Indiana State Police Seymour Post, 721 East Tipton Street, Seymour. Any media wishing to attend are asked to be set up by 10:45 a.m.

Why:                This is an opportunity for the Indiana State Police to honor and recognize the service and bravery of those members who have made the ultimate sacrifice to keep Hoosiers across Indiana safe.

Media Note:     The service is expected to last approximately thirty to forty-five minutes.

Forty-five Indiana State Police Personnel have died in the line of duty since the inception of the Indiana State Police in 1933. Two of those personnel, George A. Forster and Earl L. Brown, were working out of the Seymour district when killed. Trooper Foster died as a result of his patrol car being struck by a truck towing a horse trailer on State Road 3 near Paris Crossing. Trooper Brown was shot and killed while searching a hitchhiker on US 31 near Columbus, Indiana.

Please direct inquiries about this advisory to Sgt. Don Gregory

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MARIJUANA FOUND IN LOAD OF PRODUCE

Troopers and CMV Officers find over 100 pounds of Marijuana

Photo Group: L-R is Trooper Tharp, CMV Supervisor Cindy Gray,

CMV officer Tom Cole, Trooper Finney and "Sabre"

Terre Hautte---This afternoon at 2:47p.m., Indiana State Police Troopers and Commercial Motor Vehicle Enforcement Officers were working at the eastbound I-70 Scale Facility located near the one mile marker when Master Trooper Chuck Tharp, Commercial Motor Vehicle Enforcement Officer Supervisor Cindy Gray and CMV officer Tom Cole initiated an inspection of an eastbound tractor-trailer unit. The refrigerated semi was hauling a load of produce melons from Nogales, Arizona to Schenectady, New York.

During the inspection, the officers became suspicious of the two men inside the tractor and their paperwork. Indiana State Police Trooper Mike Finney and his canine partner “Sabre” were then summoned to assist. The ISP canine “alerted” in the area of the tractor’s cab and trailer. Officers then located nearly 30 grams of suspected marijuana inside the cab. The two males were immediately taken into custody. CMV Supervisor Cindy Gray then entered the rear of the trailer to inspect the load of produce melons and found six bales of suspected marijuana wrapped in plastic and hidden among the boxes of produce.

Photo Offloading:   Top: Trooper Mike Finney,

Middle: CMV Officer Arlene Sandusky,

Bottom: Trooper Chuck Tharp

The driver was transported to Terre Haute Regional Hospital for a chemical test and then incarcerated in the Vigo County Jail. The passenger was taken to the Vigo County Jail.

The tractor and trailer were then taken to a local Terre Haute retailer where the boxes of melons were off loaded with a forklift. Troopers examined the now empty trailer and the entire load of melons with the assistance of “Sabre”. No other marijuana was found.

ARRESTED DRIVER: Renaldo R. Ferguson, age 30, of Paterson, New Jersey

CHARGES:                             (1) count of Operating While Intoxicated (Marijuana), C misdemeanor

(1)   count Dealing in Marijuana, Class C felony

ARRESTED PASSENGER:     Omar A. Andrews, age 25, of Mount Vernon, New York

CHARGE:                                (1) count of Dealing in Marijuana, Class C felony

The six bales of marijuana weighed approximately 133 pounds with an estimated street value of $120,000. Also confiscated was $4000 in US currency found inside the cab. All items were entered into state police evidence and the tractor trailer unit was impounded.

The trucking company listed on the 2008 Kenworth tractor was Strongarm Transportation Company from Lithonia, Georgia.

A person convicted of a Class C felony can be imprisoned 2-8 years and fined a maximum of $10,000.

A person convicted of a Class C misdemeanor can be jailed up to 60 days and fined a maximum of $500.

Assisting in the investigation were Terre Haute District Commander Lieutenant Mike Eslinger, Sergeants Jared Nicoson, Tom Hannon and Joe Watts, ISP Crime Scene Investigator Andy Lohrman, Troopers Mike Laney and Jason Owen, CMV Officer Arlene Sandusky, members of the Indiana State Police Drug Enforcement Section and the Vigo County Prosecutor’s Office.

Direct any questions to Sergeant Joe Watts.

May 20, 2009

Chrysler judge tosses out Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdocks motion

INDIANAPOLIS---A U.S. Bankruptcy Court today threw out a motion by two Indiana pension funds to delay a Chrysler bankruptcy hearing.

 Judge Arthur J. Gonzalez said lawyers for the two funds — the $7.8 billion Indiana State Teachers Retirement Fund and the $250 million Indiana State Police Pension Trust — and the $2.5 billion Indiana Major Moves Construction Fund, a highway construction fund, failed to prove that postponing the bankruptcy hearing, set for May 27, would not result in irreparable harm to the pension plans or Chrysler.

According to court documents, the teachers fund holds about $32.4 million in Chrysler secured debt, the construction fund holds $8.8 million and the state police fund, $1.3 million.

Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock, who oversees the investments of the state police and construction funds, released a statement prior to the decision, saying the U.S. Treasury’s plan to pay secured debt holders 29 cents on the dollar after paying non-secured debt holders will overturn “100 years of established law by redefining ‘secured creditors’ to mean something less.”

“The court filing is aimed not only at recouping those losses but also reassessing the rule of law and preventing the federal government from pursuing policies that strike at the heart of the capital system,” Mr. Mourdock said in the release.

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Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock

files suit on behalf of the Indiana State Police Pension Trust

INDIANAPOLIS---Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock announced that two state pension funds have filed with the US Bankruptcy Court presiding over Chrysler’s Chapter 11 case objecting to the proposed sale of substantially all of Chrysler’s assets and seeking the appointment of a trustee to protect their security interests and property rights. Indiana was the sole creditor to file objections with the court.

The papers, which also include a motion to withdraw the litigation to federal district court, were filed on behalf of the Indiana State Police Pension Trust and the Indiana State Teachers’ Retirement Fund– which are fiduciaries for the investment of retirement assets for approximately 100,000 civil servants, including policemen, school teachers, and their families – and the Indiana Major Moves Construction Fund, an infrastructure construction fund.

The papers were filed in US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York on May 19, 2009.

As stated in the filings, the US Treasury Task Force is seeking to use the Chrysler bankruptcy to extinguish the property rights of the pension funds as secured lenders, violating the most fundamental tenets of creditor rights in disregard of widely recognized bankruptcy jurisprudence.

The proposed restructuring of stakeholders’ rights seeks to make payments of billions of dollars to unsecured creditors, while paying the secured creditors only 29 cents on the dollar.

“As fiduciaries, we can’t allow our retired police officers and teachers to be ripped off by the federal government. The Indiana state funds suffered losses when the Obama administration overturned more than 100 years of established law by redefining ‘secured creditors’ to mean something less,” explained Treasurer Richard Mourdock. “The court filing is aimed not only at recouping those losses but also reasserting the rule of law and preventing the federal government from pursuing policies that strike at the heart of the capital system."

The pension plans have also sought the appointment of an independent trustee to protect the assets and stakeholders of Chrysler from further harm. This request is based on public statements and testimony already made by Chrysler in the Chapter 11 bankruptcy case that the US government has assumed control over the fundamental aspects of Chrysler’s reorganization, thereby interfering with Chrysler’s ability to properly perform its fiduciary duties to stakeholders.

The court filing follows a May 18 announcement by Treasurer Mourdock that curtails portfolios under his control from making additional investments in secured corporate debt of businesses that are receiving or will be receiving federal bailout money.

Source: Office of Indiana State Treasurer

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Indiana State Police Putnamville District Holds Annual 2009 Memorial Service

The Indiana State Police Putnamville District held their annual memorial service today for those members of the department who gave their lives in the line of duty. Motor carrier inspectors, troopers, and civilian employees present, were brought to attention and prepared for roll call. Retired department personnel and surviving family members of deceased employees were also in attendance.

Assistant Commander of the Operational Support Division Captain Brent Johnson and Lieutenant Dan Jones, Commander of the Putnamville District read each of the 45 fallen members of the Indiana State Police have died in the line of duty since the department’s inception in 1933; along with a description of the circumstances surrounding their death.

Since the early days of the Indiana State Police, memorial services have been held each May at all Indiana State Police districts to perpetuate the memory of those who have died in the line of duty. The service serves as a means of paying tribute to those who died in the line of duty, that their sacrifice was not made in vain, and as a reminder to those of us left behind that we should strive to maintain the level of professional service to the public our departed comrades so unselfishly gave their lives for.

Through the efforts of the Indiana Troopers Association, burial sites of all the department employees were located and an Indiana State Police Memorial Flag was placed at each gravesite.

After the Putnamville District’s memorial service, family members, troopers and guests enjoyed an outdoor meal of hamburgers and hot dogs provided by the Indiana State Police Alliance.

For a complete listing of Indiana State Police employees killed in the line of duty and a summary of their deaths, visit the Indiana State Police website at www.in.gov/isp and click on the “In Memoriam” link on the left side of the page.

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Indiana state police remember those lost in the line of duty

By KEVIN LILLY
For the Kokomo Tribune

PERU---Indiana State Police staged their annual memorial service for the 45 officers who have died in the line of duty.

Among those who turned out was Sarah Barrett, mother of fallen Trooper Daniel Barrett.

“I know he would want us to come, and he would come, too, for the fellow officers,” she said.

Daniel Barrett was 25 when he was killed while pursuing a speeding vehicle along an icy U.S. 31 in northern Fulton County on Jan. 27, 2008. He is the department’s most recent loss.

During the ceremony, the names of all 45 officers were read aloud, along with the circumstances of their deaths. Afterward, Post Commander Matt Bilkey spoke of the significance of reading each name.

“The least we can do is recognize them and remember them,” Bilkey said. “We try to honor them every day by not only the way we do our jobs, but the way we live our lives.”

He went on to say that those who paid the ultimate sacrifice defending a civilized way of life were not just employees, but friends and family members.

“I think we all owe them our respect, our admiration for their sacrifice, and not only a recognition of their service but of those who are left behind, their family members,” Bilkey said.

The bagpipes were played on a sunny, windy day as traffic roared past along U.S. 31. Prayers asked for protection and the blessings of law enforcement officers, as well as those in the military. Officers stood at attention during the playing of taps.

Sarah Barrett, along with her husband and daughter, recently returned from a ceremony in Washington, D.C., where Daniel’s name had been inscribed on a stone wall filled with thousands of names of police officers who had been killed in the line of duty.

“It was a happy occasion, and it was a sad occasion because of the ones that lost their lives in the line of duty along with our son,” Barrett said. “They pay very high respect for all of the officers nationwide.”

Indiana Concerns of Police Survivors, also known as COPS, paid the way for the Barretts as part of the organization’s mission to rebuild the lives of survivors. Barrett said the family also attended group meetings that helped them to deal with the grief.

May 19, 2009

Connersville Post Holds Annual

Memorial Service

Connersville---The Indiana State Police Post at Connersville held their annual memorial service today for those members of the department that gave their lives in the line of duty. Troopers present were put in formation and brought to attention in preparation for the roll call.  Area Four Captain Jimmie Durnil and Connersville Commander Lieutenant Steve Comer then read each fallen member’s name, along with a description of the circumstances surrounding their death.

A total of 45 members of the Indiana State Police have died in the line of duty since the department’s inception in 1933.  The Connersville Post has lost three troopers in the line of duty.  A widow of one of Connersville’s fallen attended the service along with several Connersville Post retirees.

Since the early days of the Indiana State Police, memorial services have been held each May at all Indiana State Police Districts to perpetuate the memory of those who have died in the line of duty.  The service serves as a means of paying tribute to those who died in the line of duty, that their sacrifice was not made in vain, and as a reminder to those of us left behind that we should strive to maintain the level of professional service to the public our departed comrades so unselfishly gave their lives for.

For a complete listing of Indiana Troopers killed in the line of duty and a summary of their deaths, visit the Indiana State Police website at www.in.gov/isp and click on the “In Memoriam” link on the left side of the page.

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Indiana treasurer says Chrysler deal caused $147,400

fund loss to the Indiana State Police Pension Fund

INDIANAPOLIS---Indiana's treasurer says he won't invest more state money in the corporate debt of companies receiving federal funds after two funds he controls were stung by more than $1 million in combined losses in the Chrysler bankruptcy.

Treasurer Richard Mourdock says the Indiana State Police Pension Fund lost $147,400 and the Major Moves Construction Fund lost $896,000.

Mourdock says the administration of President Barack Obama put the financial interest of other parties ahead of secured lenders such as the state, even though secured creditors are typically first to get paid in a bankruptcy. Mourdock says the move was "fundamentally wrong."

Obama had urged Chrysler's bondholders to make sacrifices to help the automaker.

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Indiana state police remember fallen comrades

REDKEY---Just a few days ago, Renbarger, 23, was nearly struck by a motorist who decided to cross both lanes of the interstate and missed the trooper's patrol car by only inches.

"There's been several times I have just missed being hit by a car in the last year and a half," Renbarger said.

State police and motor carrier officers from the Redkey district came together Monday for a yearly memorial service to honor dozens of officers killed in the line of duty.

A granite memorial and eternal flame that honors those officers is located at the Indianapolis District headquarters off Post Road at I-70.

The most recent trooper to die was Daniel R. Barrett of Logansport, killed in January 2008 when his car crashed into a tree as he pursued a speeding motorist on U.S. 31.

Capt. Bob Rich and Lt. Mike Nichols, commander of the Redkey district, read the names of 45 fallen officers as others stood at attention with nearly 20 retired officers and their families watching.

"The strength of the Indiana State Police lies in the character of its officers," said Rich, who encouraged both new and veteran officers to look sharp and be sharp.

Rich lauded the performance of some Redkey-based officers who helped with President Barack Obama's security detail in South Bend on Sunday. Dozens of protesters were arrested during the president's speech at the University of Notre Dame.

Other retired officers -- including Larry Clendenin, 73 -- talked with fellow retirees about how public safety has changed in the past 50 years. Clendenin oversaw motor vehicle inspection programs and served from 1958-79.

"People just tend not to respect authority like they used to," Clendenin said.

May 18, 2009

Indiana State Police REDKEY DISTRICT

Holds Annual Memorial Service

Identifiers not provided

The Indiana State Police Redkey District held their annual memorial service today for those members of the department who gave their lives in the line of duty. Motor carrier inspectors, troopers, and civilian employees present, were brought to attention and prepared for roll call. Retired department personnel and surviving family members of deceased employees were also in attendance.

Area II Captain Bob Rich and Lieutenant Mike Nichols, Commander of the Redkey District read each of the 45 fallen members of the Indiana State Police have died in the line of duty since the department’s inception in 1933; along with a description of the circumstances surrounding their death.

Since the early days of the Indiana State Police, memorial services have been held each May at all Indiana State Police districts to perpetuate the memory of those who have died in the line of duty. The service serves as a means of paying tribute to those who died in the line of duty, that their sacrifice was not made in vain, and as a reminder to those of us left behind that we should strive to maintain the level of professional service to the public our departed comrades so unselfishly gave their lives for.

Through the efforts of the Indiana Troopers Association, burial sites of all the department employees were located and an Indiana State Police Memorial Flag was placed at each gravesite.

After the Redkey District’s memorial service, family members and troopers visited the grave of Trooper William J. Trees located in Upland, Indiana. Trooper Trees was killed June 26, 1972 while on road patrol in the Evansville District. He was pursuing a fleeing vehicle at a high rate of speed, and during the pursuit Trooper Trees was involved in a crash that claimed his life.

Troopers also place a memorial flag at the gravesite of Trooper Robert J. Garrison who is buried in Montpelier, Indiana. Trooper Garrison was killed December 14, 1959 while working at the Pendleton District. Trooper Garrison was patrolling on State Road 67 when he was involved in an automobile accident and died instantly of head injuries sustained in the crash.

For a complete listing of Indiana State Police employees killed in the line of duty and a summary of their deaths, visit the Indiana State Police website at www.in.gov/isp and click on the “In Memoriam” link on the left side of the page.

May 17, 2009

10-0 James A. Wire

Indiana conservation officer from 1949 until 1978

HOWE---James A. Wire, 92, of Howe died Thursday, May 14, 2009, at Miller’s Merry Manor in LaGrange.

He was born on July 11, 1916, in Fort Wayne to Lloyd M. and Belle Parent (Garver) Wire. On Aug. 1, 1940, in Fort Wayne he married Gwendolyn “Babe” Parrish; Mrs. Wire preceded him in death on Sept. 7, 2003.

Jim was a conservation officer from 1949 until 1978, and served his 29-year career in LaGrange County. He performed his regular duties as conservation officer with integrity, and was active in conservation education statewide and conducted gun and water safety clinics, teaching at youth camps and speaking to civic organizations.

He built a collection of more than 5,000 color slides as well as much film footage that was used for departmental training movies. He was also active in acquiring new wildlife areas and developing the Curtis Creek Fish Hatchery in LaGrange Co.

As a result of his dedication, he was selected as State Wildlife Conservationist of the Year. In 1965 he was cited by President Lyndon B. Johnson as National Wildlife Conservationist of the Year, and in early 1966, he and Gwen traveled to Washington, DC where he was awarded for his achievements by First Lady, Lady Byrd Johnson. He was also a recipient of the Sagamore of the Wabash Award.

Jim loved the Lord and read his Bible with vigor until he could no longer read due to his diabetes and was a member of Brighton Chapel in Howe. It is a great comfort to his children to know that he and their mother are home together with the Lord.

Surviving are a daughter and son-in-law, Carolyn D. and William Jacobs of Woodburn; a son and daughter-in-law, James R. and Shirley Wire of Howe; four grandchildren, Debbie Duesler, Kathy Cossairt and Jeff Wire, all of Howe, and Becky Jacobs of Woodburn; six great-grandchildren; one great-great-granddaughter; and a sister, Bonnie Northrop of Ann Arbor, Mich.

Preceding him in death besides his wife were a grandson, Zak William Jacobs on Sept. 27, 1984; a sister, Marjorie Miller; and a brother, Lloyd Robert Wire.

Funeral services will be held on Tuesday, May 19, 2009, at 10:30 a.m. at Brighton Chapel in Howe, with Revs. Jeremy Helmuth and Dwight Kauffman officiating. Burial will be in Brighton Cemetery in Howe.

Visitation will be from 2-4 and 6-8 pm on Monday, May 18, 2009, at Frurip-May Funeral Home in LaGrange.

Memorials may be given to LaGrange County Parks Department.

May 16, 2009

ISP makes sure students are safe on buses

Special enforcement detail comes to Greene County

story courtesy of the Green County Daily World

photos by (Greene County Daily World/Nick Schneider)


Bloomfield School District Bus No. 12 students had a special rider and a couple of escorts Thursday afternoon on the trip home from school.

Indiana State Police Sgt Curt Durnil was aboard the bus as part of a special enforcement detail that was hunting for stop arm violators.

On the bus, Sgt. Durnil was talking to the school children and looking for violators as it wound its way south on U.S. 231 through Scotland and eventually ending at the home of second-year bus driver Keith Bennett -- near Doans just off State Road 58.


Bennett had experienced large truck disregarding the flashing red lights on his bus and running past the extended stop arm on more than one occasion -- putting his student riders in danger.

The stop arm is extended and red lights activated before the students cross the road in front of the bus as they enter or depart.

The concerned bus driver and Bloomfield School Superintendent Dan Sichting both contacted the Indiana State Police Post at Bloomington to report the recent incidents.

Bennett had been unable to jot down complete license plate numbers on the previous violators, but wondered what could be done to help.

ISP Master Trooper Mark Raper, a Greene County native who's in charge of the Bloomington Post's Bus Inspection Division, was contacted and he organized the special patrol detail that featured a pair of "chase" IPS trooper who were poised to issue citations to any violators they witnessed.

Aside from Sgt. Durnil stationed inside the bus, Master Trooper Raper along with Troopers Julie Meisel and William Brown, were stationed in police cruisers that trailed the bus by several hundred yards as it left the school grounds.

The troopers were in radio contact and standing at the ready to act at the first hint of a violation.

Before departing, the troopers reviewed the statutes governing stop arm violations -- a class A infraction unless it causes an accident and then it's considered a misdemeanor.

They also talked about potential court dates for violators.

The infraction ticket carries about a $122 fine in Greene Superior Court, according to Trooper Brown.

According to state law (IC 9-21-12-1), a person who drives a vehicle that meets or overtakes from any direction a school bus stopped on a roadway or is not stopped before reaching the school bus when the arm signal device is out and proceeds before the arm signal device is no longer extended commits the offense.

On this day, the approximate 45-minute bus route was completed without a violation -- which is good news for the participating troopers.

However, that doesn't diminish the potential harm and danger that is presented when this law is violated -- like it so often is on Hoosier roadways.

Durnil pointed out that troopers deal with a lot of different traffic violations, but this school bus arm violation is taken very seriously.

A similar enforcement patrol in Monroe County conducted in February resulted in three tickets issued.

"We'd like to do more of these. We are getting complaints all of the time," Durnil said. "These (bus) drivers they are giving them more than adequate time. I have sat and watched them. They give them plenty of time. There is a reason they (the buses) are painted yellow. You can't miss them."

Sgt. Durnil said catching these violators is tricky.

"It's not the easiest violation in the world to catch. You have to have been right there," he said.

Trooper Raper agreed and added, "If the (bus) driver can give us a plate number we can still make an arrest. But it's tough to get a plate number and watch our kids too. Their primary concern is our kids."

The ISP trooper added that the safety of the student riders is key.

"We try to keep them (the buses) safe. That's our most important concern to keep the buses safe and keep the children safe. That's the ultimate goal and that's why we do this," he said.

Bus driver Bennett said some days it's really bad on his route.

"I've had semis whip over in front of me and almost got hit. It's been on (SR) 58 most of the time. It's been log trucks and tri-axles and some coal trucks," he told the Greene County Daily World, who had been invited by the ISP to ride along on this special enforcement detail.

Bennett said he's pleased there were no violators on this particular day and acknowledged that he appreciates the ISP coming out and checking into the problem.

He was carrying special cargo -- about 50 students.

"If anything else, maybe the kids will go home and tell their parents and then that might help. This was absolutely a good thing," he said standing in front of his bright-yellow colored bus. "I just don't want anyone to get run over. That scares me to death. The kids are in such a hurry to get home or in such a hurry to get on the bus. I got most of them that will look for me to motion them across the road. There are still one or two now and then that will just dart right out there."

Bennett said he enjoys driving the bus and said it fits in well with his family farming job.

The bus driver noted that his grandfather, Gene Watkins, drove a bus for 58 years until he retired two years ago and then he (Bennett) took over the route in Richland and Taylor townships.

"It (bus driving) has kind of been in our family for a long time," he said with a big smile.

May 15, 2009

Peru Post Memorial Service

Due to a scheduling conflict the Peru Memorial service has been changed from 11:30 am to 11:00 am on Tuesday, May 19th

I apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. 

Thanks, Matt.

Matt Bilkey, Lieutenant
District Commander
Indiana State Police-District #16
1451 N. Eel River Cemetery Road
Peru, IN 46970
765-473-6666
765-437-0046 (C)
mbilkey@isp.in.gov

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Indiana State Police

12th Annual Investigation Division Golf Outing

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Week honors fallen troopers

ANGOLA---This month, and especially this week, is a time when law enforcement personnel around are celebrated, and in some cases, mourned.

May is National Law Enforcement Month, and this week, May 10-16, is designated as National Law Enforcement Week.

 Today also represents a hallowed day for police, Peace Officer’s Memorial Day. The Indiana State Police and the Indiana Troopers Association, which is based in Angola, are honoring the 45 state troopers, along with other fallen police officers, throughout the month.

Troopers Association director of operations Karen Shelton said she sent notices to officers throughout the state to place memorial flags on the burial sites of officers who’d perished in the line of duty.

Shelton said she was surprised that nearly all of the 45 sites, including the burial plots of Dave Deuter of Steuben County, who is buried in Orland, and Don Turner, buried in DeKalb County, had had memorial flags placed on the graves

“It’s just a way of honoring those who’ve fallen,” Shelton said.

Deuter, who was a part of the Toll Road Post, was killed in the line of duty in 1998.

Shelton noted that the two LaGrange toll plazas have stones honoring Deuter, which were placed last year.

Each post also holds its own memorial service for each of the fallen, where the names of every trooper killed in the line of duty is read, along with a brief paragraph about what happened.

“It’s a nice tribute that they do,” Shelton said. The Toll Roll post’s service takes place Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the post near South Bend, with the Fort Wayne Post holding its service May 28, also at 11 a.m.

In addition to the memorials, Gov. Mitch Daniels has ordered all flags be flown at half staff today in honor of Peace Officers Memorial Day.

May 13, 2009

Troopers Serve Communities On and Off Duty

Three area local organizations are purchasing needed items thanks to the generosity of the Indiana State Police Alliance (ISPA) and the troopers that the organization represents. The Fulton Athletic League, the Peru Little League, and the Peru High School varsity girl’s basketball team have been provided grant money to purchase needed equipment and uniforms.

The needs of the different youth organizations were brought to the attention of troopers who volunteer as coaches for various teams. Officers recommended the specific organization for a grant. An application detailing the specific need of the organizations was submitted to the Indiana State Police Alliance Board of Directors. The board then decides if certain criteria was met and then distributed the grant money.

The money was provided as part of the ISPA “Cops for Kids” program which was started in 1991. The ongoing program is an effort to make a positive impact on crime prevention by building relationships between police officers and children. Through “Cops for Kids”, children, from toddlers to teens, witness first hand that their Indiana state troopers are stalwart members of the community, committed to serving all citizens.

“Due to the poor economy sponsorship money has been hard to come by,” stated Indiana State Police Sergeant Dean Marks. “The money provided by the ISPA was needed and greatly appreciated. It allowed us to purchase top notch equipment to keep our little leaguers safe as they played baseball.”

The Indiana State Police has been dedicated to serving the citizens and visitors of Indiana since 1933. Troopers understand that commitment to serving ones community is expected whether an officer is on duty or not. Many state police employees volunteer their talents to various organizations while off duty, but many gravitate towards youth sports.  Police officers understand how important it is for children to have positive interaction with positive role models, being part of a team, and the ability to overcome challenges presented during team competition.

The Indiana State Police Peru Post covers Cass, Fulton, Howard, Miami, Tipton, and Wabash Counties in north central Indiana. Troopers working out of the Peru District are continuing the Indiana State Police tradition of commitment to community service and youth sports set by their predecessors. Troopers who are currently coaching various teams in their communities are as follows:Lieutenant Matt Bilkey, baseball, Northwestern Youth League

Anyone wanting information on the ISPA “Cops for Kids” program should call the Indiana State Police Alliance at 1-800-382-1104.

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Indiana State Police Motor Carrier Inspector

Finds One of America’s Most Wanted

Jackson County---Master Motor Carrier Inspector Mary Eglen discovered Michael Dwayne LaMasters, wanted for 64 criminal counts, riding in a semi tractor trailer coming back from Florida this morning.

At approximately 6:30 a.m. Inspector Eglen was working out of the northbound scales on I-65 near Seymour when she directed a semi driver to pull onto the back lot for a routine check of his paperwork. As the driver pulled across the scales Eglen noticed a second male subject in the semi. When the driver brought his paperwork into the scales office, Eglen asked if that was a co-driver with him. The driver stated the passenger was just a friend who had authorization to be in the semi. Semi drivers are required by law to have written information on file with their company giving them authorization to carry a specific passenger while they are driving, none was found.

The driver was hauling seed corn back from Florida and his log book was discovered to be falsified in an attempt to conceal the actual length of time he had been driving. Eglen calculated the driver had been driving 18 of the last 20 hours and instructed him to correct his log book to show his true hours driving. She then asked if the passenger had a driver’s license.

The driver made several trips back to his truck to gather the information requested without producing anything. Eglen was eventually told the passenger did not have any identification on him because it had allegedly been stolen. The passenger was instructed to come in and write down his information for identification purposes. The Seymour Post dispatcher was contacted to check the individual’s identity in the computer system.

Even though a few social security numbers were switched around a return came back on LaMasters with a lengthy criminal history, indicating that he was wanted by three different law enforcement agencies.

Trooper Raymond Hunt and Master Trooper Kevin Riordan were immediately dispatched to the scales to take LaMasters into custody. When the troopers arrived Inspector Eglen pointed out LaMasters. LaMasters informed the officers he knew what this was all about and he was ready.

rooper Hunt told LaMasters that he was aware of his extensive criminal history and instructed him to turn around and put his hands behind his back. Michael Dwayne LaMasters complied with Trooper Hunt’s directions and was taken into custody without incident. LaMasters was transported to the Jackson County Jail where he will be held for extradited back to Oregon.  

LaMasters warrant contains 64 criminal counts involving incest, sexual abuse, sodomy, felony assault, criminal mistreatment, attempted sexual abuse and abuse. More information on LaMasters can be found at the following web site of America’s Most Wanted, http://www.amw.com/fugitives/case.cfm?id=63063.

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10-0 Ralph E. Taylor retired Indiana Department of Natural Resources Officer

RALPH E. TAYLOR, 61, passed away Monday, May 11, 2009, at Parkview Hospital, Fort Wayne. Born in Fort Wayne, he was a retired Conservation Lieutenant serving from 1973 to 2003. He was Area Commander for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Law Enforcement Division from 1985 to 2003. He was also an Allen County Deputy Coroner since 2003 and was a Certified Medico-Legal Death Investigator.

He enjoyed hunting, fishing, growing wildflowers, and a wide variety of other outdoor activities.

He was a tinkerer who was passionate about life and loved his family and wide circle of friends.

He developed the Allen County Coroner's "Drive Alive" Campaign, served on the Indiana State Lakes Management Work Group, and received the "Sagamore of the Wabash Award" in 2003.

 He is survived by his wife, Cheryl K. Taylor of Fort Wayne; father, Ralph E. Taylor Sr. of Fort Wayne; mother, Leta M. Strong of Auburn; son, Shane K. Taylor of Fort Wayne; daughter, Debi K. (Daniel) Krabach of Fort Wayne; sisters, Janet (Jeff) Emmons of Fort Wayne and Judine Taylor (Richard Pressman) of San Antonio, Texas; and granddaughters, Stacey Budd of Pleasant Lake, Caitlin Krabach, and Andrea Krabach, both of Fort Wayne.

Service is 10:30 a.m. Friday at D.O. McComb & Sons Pine Valley Park, 1320 East Dupont Road, with calling one hour prior. Fr. Mark Gurtner officiating. Calling also from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home.

Burial in Highland Park Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the Drive Alive Campaign or Ralph E. Taylor Conservation Fund c/o Steuben County Community Foundation. To sign the online guest book, visit www.mccombandsons.com

May 11, 2009

Indianapolis appoints Jim White emergency management director

INDIANAPOLIS---Indianapolis finally has a new emergency management director.

Jim White, who served with the U.S. Army in Iraq, will be the new administrator of the city emergency management division.

The appointment will place White in charge of the contingency planning for the 2012 Super Bowl to be held in Indianapolis.

White comes to city government from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IUPUI, where he was a clinical lecturer.

A former member of the Indiana State Police, he also handled security arrangements for the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta and was stationed at Camp Victory in Iraq.

That post had been vacant since January. White will report to public safety director Scott Newman.

May 08, 2009

Indiana State Police pause to honor fallen troopers

By Sgt Chris Lewis Indiana State Police Honor Guard

(from left) Troopers Kevin Getz, Eric Russell, Brad Stille,

Corporal Eric Dunn and Trooper Jason Cobb


Bloomington -- The Indiana State Police Post at Bloomington conducted their annual memorial service Thursday for those members of the department that gave their lives in the line of duty.

Troopers present were brought to attention and prepared for the roll call. Captain Danny Price and Lieutenant Paul Bucher then read each fallen member's name, along with a description of the circumstances surrounding their death.

A total of 45 members of the Indiana State Police have died in the line of duty since the department's inception in 1933.

By Sgt. Chris Taylor Trooper Alan Deel being presented with

the Trooper JD Maxwell Memorial Award for DUI Enforcement.

From left, Captain Danny Price, Telecommunications Officer Ken Maxwell

(brother of Trooper JD Maxwell), Lt. Paul Bucher, Trooper Alan Deel,

Chaplains Erin Raper and Daniel K. Coffey.


Since the early days of the Indiana State Police, memorial services have been held each May at all Indiana State Police districts to perpetuate the memory of those who have died in the line of duty.

By Sgt. Chris Taylor

"The service serves as a means of paying tribute to those who died in the line of duty, that their sacrifice was not made in vain, and as a reminder to those of us left behind that we should strive to maintain the level of professional service to the public our departed comrades so unselfishly gave their lives for," Sgt. Curt Durnil said in a prepared news release.

By Sgt. Chris Taylor Troopers in formation

while the roll was called for Fallen Troopers.

May 07, 2009

Photos of Shawn with the Indiana State Police

at Thunder Over Louisville

According to Sgt/PIO Jerry Goodin of the Sellersburg Post showed this young boy, Shawn, around the area and allowed him an upclose look at the motorcycles and other ISP equipment and vehicles.  Shawn made a huge impact and touched the heart of all who met him.   Lots of folks think that troopers take their jobs as being just to arrest "bad people", while the truth is that most trooper take the job to help people - espeically children.  Troopers who met Shawn truly hope they made his life and his special day a little more enjoyable by spending time with them.

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Indiana State Police Honor One of Their Own,

Fallen Trooper Robert C. Gillespie

Bedford – The Indiana State Police along with the Indiana Troopers Association honored fallen Trooper Robert C. Gillespie today with a graveside memorial near Bedford. Trooper Gillespie gave his life in the line of duty on June 8th, 1962. Trooper Gillespie’s widow, Naomi Gillespie, along with her family were welcomed as were Troopers present at the service.

Left Photo: Scott Gillespie speaks with Trooper Jason Cobb

Right Photo: Naomi Gillespie speaks with Trooper Kevin Getz

Left Photo: Honor Guard stands over Fallen Trooper Robert Gillespie's gravesite

Right Photo: The Gillespie Family

Indiana State Police Honor Guard left to right: Troopers Ryan Miller,

Eric Russell, Brad Stille, Corporal Eric Dunn, and Trooper Jason Cobb

Photo on right: Captain Jim Durnil and Sgt. Curt Durnil reading about

the life of Trooper Robert Gillespie during the ceremony

After a word of prayer was offered by Bloomington District First Sergeant, Dennis Kirkman, Sergeant Curt Durnil offered these words about the service. “We are here today to honor a fallen hero. Trooper Robert Gillespie died in the line of duty almost 47 years ago to keep the citizens of the State of Indiana safe. The Indiana Troopers Association’s vision of placing a memorial flag at every fallen trooper’s gravesite is being realized today. It is with great pride and honor that I place this flag at the right of Trooper Robert Gillespie”.

The service followed with words from Captain Jim Durnil. Captain Durnil stated that “Trooper Gillespie’s life was always centered on ‘answering the call’ ”. Trooper Gillespie most certainly spent his life answering the numerous calls for service to his fellow man. After graduating from Bedford High School in 1946, Gillespie enlisted in the United States Navy and served in Cuba from 1946 – 1949. After attending Indiana University in the spring of 1950, Gillespie married his sweetheart, Ms. Naomi Pierce in May of that same year. Gillespie applied for the Indiana State Police in the summer of 1950 and was sworn in on his 23rd birthday, September 1st, 1950.

Trooper Gillespie’s line of duty biography reads as follows;

Trooper Robert C. Gillespie, Seymour Post.

Appointed September 1st, 1950.

Died June 8th, 1962.

“While enroute to the town of Mitchell in response to a request for assistance, Trooper Gillespie, who was traveling at a high rate of speed with emergency lights on, was forced to leave the road when a pick-up truck slowed in front of him. Leaving the highway to avoid the truck, Trooper Gillespie swerved back on the highway to avoid another car in his path. His vehicle was then struck by another car. Trooper Gillespie died as a result of his injuries.”              

Trooper Gillespie died “answering the call”.

Family and friends were then given the opportunity to share a story or memory about Trooper Gillespie. Family stated that he was a wonderful husband and father.

Gillespie’s son, Scott, shared information that in 1959 Trooper Gillespie was shot twice by a man who had stolen a car near the Post Office in Avoca, IN.  After being hit, Trooper Gillespie got back into his patrol car and pursued the suspect until he could corner him and wait for backup. Again, Trooper Gillespie answered the call.

The Indiana Troopers Association will continue to facilitate these memorial flags being placed at fallen troopers gravesites on an annual basis. May is Law Enforcement Officer Memorial Month.

*****************************

Marijuana Eradication Section and Pilots

Photo taken 5-06-09 at training in Lebanon, Indiana.

This photo contains all of the full-time Marijuana Eradication Officers and Pilots from the Aviation Section.

(no identifiers included)

Jeff Kastenschmidt

May 06, 2009

Trooper Caleb Anderson Benefit for daughter with leukemia

The outing is hosted by Courtney Reichart & Mariah Betz

www.caringbridge.org/visit/aubreyanderson1

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Indianapolis memorial service honors fallen Indiana state troopers

Left: Lt. Gary Dudley's widow Carolyn

Right: Indiana State Police Color Guard

As a carillon sounded faintly in the wind, dozens of state troopers stood silently to honor fallen comrades.

At the annual Indiana State Police memorial service Tuesday, the names of the 45 who have died in the line of duty were read. It took 15 minutes to call the names, from Eugene Teague, who was shot to death while trying to apprehend members of the Dillinger gang in 1933, to Daniel Barrett, who was killed in a crash during a pursuit last year.

They died in a line of duty where a car can be as deadly as a gun. About half the troopers died in traffic crashes. Among them was Lt. Gary Dudley, who was struck by a truck during a charity bicycle ride three years ago.

"It's a good way to honor the officers," said Carolyn Dudley, the trooper's widow, who attended the service. "I'm here supporting these guys, and I always will because they've taken good care of me over the years."

The ceremony was at the state memorial for firefighters and police on Senate Avenue, across the street from the Statehouse. A handful of people attended.

Deborah Elliott's brother, Shelbyville Police Sgt. Gary Henderson, was killed in October 2007 by tires that had broken off a passing semi on I-74. That same kind of roadside death has taken the past seven state troopers who have been killed on duty.

On Tuesday, Elliott happened to be at the Indiana State Library when she heard a trumpeter playing "Taps" and a bagpiper playing "Amazing Grace."

Elliott walked over. "It touched my heart," she said of seeing the color guard and troopers at attention. Years after her brother's death, Elliott said the memory is still a hard thing to overcome.

The service was the first of two in Indianapolis this week for fallen police officers. A service for Indianapolis and Marion County officers will be Friday at 11:30 a.m. at St. Mary Catholic Church, 317 N. New Jersey St.

A national memorial service will be May 15 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington as part of National Peace Officer Memorial Week, which begins Sunday.

May 05, 2009

TROOPER ENTERS WATER TO RESCUE TEEN

Today, at approximately 5:09 p.m., Indiana State Police troopers from the Terre Haute post were dispatched to the Honey Creek Bridge on US 41 to look for a 17 year old female who had walked away from the nearby Gibault School. The Honey Creek Bridge is on the south edge of Terre Haute.

Indiana State Police Sergeant David Edwards and Trooper Kris Fitzgerald arrived at approximately 5:14 p.m. and were immediately told by passers-by that the teen had jumped from the west side of the southbound lanes bridge. The troopers then noticed the female traveling downstream in the swollen Honey Creek, flailing her arms and appearing to be in distress. Trooper Fitzgerald then made his way to the bank of Honey Creek, removed his gunbelt, shoes, and uniform shirt, then entered the water and began swimming downstream toward the victim. After swimming nearly 250’ in the nearly 60 degree water, trooper Fitzgerald reached the victim. At this point, the female victim was face down in the water and floating. Trooper Fitzgerald then positioned her “face up” for breathing and swam to shore with the victim in tow. After exiting the water he immediately began first-aid procedures until ISP Sergeant David Edwards and members of the Honey Creek Fire Department arrived downstream to assist.

The 17 year old victim was extricated from the soggy wooded area by members of the Honey Creek Fire Department and transported to Terre Haute Regional Hospital by Trans Care Ambulance Service. She was experiencing symptoms of hypothermia and complained of leg pain. She was stabilized and then air-lifted to Methodist Hospital by Lifeline Air Ambulance for treatment of possible head and spinal injuries.

At the point where the female jumped, the bridge was approximately 22 feet above the water.

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I want to thank all who sent information about RADAR and when we started
using it. The information has been a great help and will be used in
preparing the information for the museum. Thank the Pioneers for all
their input!! Good Luck to all and be safe. If you come to the state
fair, I will be working in the air conditioning hall State Police Booth
during the day so stop by and say hello!

original request for info posted April 29

I am asking to know if you or ant of the Pioneer Members can assist me in finding out when we started using RADAR on the department. If you can help me out, it would be a big help. This is for the museum information which will be put at the RADAR display. Thank-you and the Pioneers for any assistance you can help me with. Hope to see you all at the Memorial Service on the 20th of May at 11:30 am.

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Candle light memorial will be held outside the Auburn Police Department

Chief Martin McCoy (Auburn PD) and I are putting together a candle light memorial service at 6 PM May 14, It will be held outside the Auburn Police Department building on Cedar St and 9th street.  We have several agencies attending.  The service will include the reading of the name of the deceased officers from the area.  We will also recognize State Trooper Turner who to our knowledge is the only officer from Dekalb county killed in the line of duty.  The  evening will end with a 21 gun salute and a blue light parade.

You and your office staff are invited to attend. 

Chaplain Steve Eckert

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ISP Dispatchers Support "Special Olympics"

reposted from 021709 w/photos

ISP Dispatchers, Troopers, as well as law enforcement officers from across the state have joined in an effort to support the "Cop On A Roof Top" project to raise funds for the Special Olympics Program.

On May 1st, there will be approximately twenty Dunkin Donuts that will participate by having a "Cop On Roof Top" Promotion.   Volunteers are needed for all locations.

Currently, there will be participating locations in the following cities:  Anderson, Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, Kokomo, Greenfield, Avon, Carmel,  and Greenwood.  Other cities will be added as the date approaches. 

Volunteers are needed from City/County/State law enforcement agencies, as well as from the DNR and Department of Corrections.  

Other events coming up to raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics include the Torch Run on June 5th, Motorcycle Ride on Sept. 19th, as well as the Plane Pull and Showdown of the Shields.

A Raffle is underway with the Grand Prize a 2009 Harley Davidson; 1st prize-$1,000 Home Depot Gift Card; additional prizes include a $500 Pacer Package, Apple IPhone and Sears gift card.  Tickets are $10 each and the drawing is Sept. 19th.

From all these events, Special Olympics supports almost 10,000 athletes in the State of Indiana.

For more information, contact T/S IV Donna Decker, SP IDACS at dqdecker@aol.com

May 04, 2009

Media Advisory

Who:                Indiana State Police, Bloomington District Memorial Service

What:               The Indiana State Police will recognize and honor fallen members from the agency who gave their lives in the line of duty for the citizens of Indiana.

When:              Thursday, May 7th, 2009 at 10:00 a.m.

Where:             The service will take place at the Indiana State Police Bloomington Post at 1500 Packinghouse Road, just off of West Vernal Pike. Space may be limited and media should be set up by 9:45 a.m.

Why:                This is an opportunity for the Indiana State Police to honor and recognize the service and bravery of those members who have made the ultimate sacrifice to keep Hoosiers across the State of Indiana safe.

Media Note:     The service is expected to last approximately thirty to forty five minutes.

Please direct inquiries about this advisory to Sgt. Curt Durnil at (812) 332-4411.

*****************************

INDIANA STATE POLICE
MEMORIAL SERVICE


 CONNERSVILLE DISTRICT #41
MAY 19, 2009

 DEDICATED IN MEMORY
OF THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES
IN THE LINE OF DUTY

May 02, 2009

Trooper Robert Gillespie Annual Graveside Memorial Service

I wanted everyone to know of a detail the Indiana Troopers Association has put into play for the second year. In an effort to remember our fallen department members, the ITA has provided a Memorial Indiana State Police Flag and pole for each fallen officer's gravesite. Thank God the Bloomington District (Lawrence County) has only one member of our department that gave his life in the line of duty.

TROOPER ROBERT C. GILLESPIE

Bedford, Indiana (Seymour Post) Appointed September 1, 1950

died June 8, 1962, of injuries sustained in a traffic crash near Mitchell, Indiana

In realizing the ITA's vision of remembering our fallen members of the department, I have planned a ceremony at the Cresthaven Cemetery on Tuesday, May 5th for Trooper Gillespie. We will stage at the Cresthaven Funeral Home parking lot at 1:30 pm and start towards Trooper Gillespie's gravesite by 1:45. The funeral home is located at 3522 Dixie Highway, just south of Bedford. Mrs. Robert Gillespie has been notified and she plans on being there along with her children, one of which is the Bedford Fire Department Chief. Some of our retirees have been notified as well.

If the Funeral Home has a funeral on that day, we will stage near the Heroes Garden, on the eastside of the cemetery.

As we that are left behind grow old, they shall not grow old.

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning,

We Will Remember Them

May 01, 2009

Indiana state police introduce Boomer, a robotic bomb specialist

EVANSVILLE---The newest Indiana State Trooper is barely 3 feet tall, weighs under 100 pounds and doesn’t wear a badge, but his explosive personality bears witness to his nickname: Boomer.

He’s an $80,000 remote control robot (made by Allen-Vanguard of the United Kingdom) who’s able to climb stairs, take pictures, digitally record audio and video (for evidence), pick up a suspicious item or even fire a weapon to “defeat the device” by disrupting it.

A technician at a remote console 500 to 1,000 yards away can maneuver the robot and monitor what it sees.

Members of the state police’s southwestern Indiana bomb squad predict Boomer will reduce potentially deadly scenarios while enhancing their work.

Boomer could even pull someone to safety, say in a hazardous materials situation, they said.

Or he could carry a phone to a hostage taker, ostensibly for communication but providing police with a bird’s eye view of the situation inside.

Boomer strutted his stuff for local media Friday morning at the Evansville State Police post, at one point using his arm and claws to drag 215-pound master trooper Frank Smith across the floor.

Smith and detective Brian Bailey work on the unit with first Sgt. Greg Oeth, the bomb squad technician.

Boomer, a spinoff of technology the military has employed in Iraq and a smaller cousin of a robot already used by the Evansville Police Department, has a four-hour battery life that can be recharged.

Chad Hilton, senior trooper and commander of the five state police bomb squadrons across Indiana, said the robot takes the place of having a technician in a protective suit approaching a device with rope and rigging.

Not only can this let the technician focus on disabling the device from a distance, it can eliminate a situation in which the bomber is waiting nearby to remotely detonate a device when the technician is in range.

Hilton said state police in Indiana get 350 to 400 calls a year, sometimes to pick up old ammunition or a military ordnance, to destroy old dynamite or detonate a homemade explosive aimed at harming an ex-spouse or scaring a teacher.

Oeth recalled a few years ago that a bank robber in Wadesville, Ind., claimed he’d left an explosive behind.

Funding for Boomer came from grants, state and federal funds, according to Hilton.

**********************

Legislators recommend naming new state police post for Bob Meeks

Bob Meeks

INDIANAPOLIS---The new state police post being built along the Indiana Toll Road near Elkhart may soon have a familiar name.

Lawmakers approved a resolution offered by State Senator Marlin Stutzman recommending the State Police name the post for Bob Meeks.

Meeks retired from the state police as commander of the Ligonier Post before entering the legislature.

Stutzman, who replaced Meeks in the State Senate last year, says Meeks embodies what the state police are all about.

The new post is being built at exit 96, which is the Elkhart East interchange.

April 30, 2009

         PENDLETON MEMORIAL SERVICE

May 21, 2009

April 29, 2009

Trooper’s Car Struck While Conducting Traffic Stop

Indianapolis---Today, at approximately 9:44 a.m., Indiana State Police responded to a two vehicle crash southbound I-465 near the 49 mile-marker involving an Indiana State Police car.

Preliminary investigation revealed that at approximately 9:44 a.m. Trooper Troy Sunier stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation southbound I-465 near the 49 mile-marker.  Trooper Sunier was sitting in his police car, a blue 2009 Ford Mustang, behind the violator’s vehicle with emergency lights on.  Jeanette A. Katekapo, 28, Speedway, IN, was driving her black 2008 Chevy Aveo southbound on I-465 in the far left lane approaching Sunier’s vehicle over the posted maximum speed limit.  Traffic was slowing as it approached Sunier’s police car and Katekapo swerved from the far left lane onto the left shoulder to avoid colliding with a vehicle in front of her.  She continued southbound on the shoulder with brakes locked striking Sunier’s vehicle.  The impact forced Sunier’s vehicle several feet forward but Sunier was able to apply the brakes on his car to avoid striking the vehicle in front of him.  Katekapo was not injured.  Trooper Sunier had complaints of pain to his neck and back.  Katekapo was issued a traffic ticket for Failure to Yield to an Emergency Vehicle.

Investigating Officer:  Trooper Jeff Woodward

*********************************

I am asking to know if you or ant of the Pioneer Members can assist me in finding out when we started using RADAR on the department. If you can help me out, it would be a big help. This is for the museum information which will be put at the RADAR display. Thank-you and the Pioneers for any assistance you can help me with. Hope to see you all at the Memorial Service on the 20th of May at 11:30 am.

*************************************

State police enforcing 'move over' law on I-70

CONNERSVILLE---The Indiana State Police will be enforcing Indiana's "move over" laws today on Interstate 70 in Wayne and Henry counties.

The "Move Over" law is designed to keep emergency personnel safe on the roadway as they work.

Drivers should approach emergency vehicles stopped along the highway with caution and yield the right-of-way by changing lanes when possible when on a highway with at least four lanes. Speed should be reduced if changing lanes is not possible or is unsafe. The same rules apply to stationary recovery vehicles and highway maintenance vehicles.

Fines for this offense can be up to $10,000 and carry a driver's license suspension.

Officers from the Connersville Indiana State Police Post will be working special enforcement details on I-70 and other state highways in the Connersville district, Lt. Steve Comer said.

A resurfacing project on the interstate in Henry and Wayne counties began Monday.

April 28, 2009

Alice Rule.... 100 years old on July 6, 2009

Widow of Trooper Paul Rule

Alice Rule, widow of Trooper Paul Rule, will be turning 100 years old on July 6, 2009.  Alice lives at Monticello Assisted Living and Healthcare Facility, 1120 N. Main Street, Monticello, IN 47960.

Paul Rule retired from disability status May 31, 1961.  He was originally appointed on July 5, 1931, left employment, and then returned.  The records show he had more than 20 years of service and it appears he spent his career in the Monticello area.  Paul passed away January 8, 1969 and his spouse, Alice, survives and is cared for by the employees at the Assisted Living facility

Reported by Don Cox ISP retired

April 27, 2009

We respectfully request your presence at the seventh annual Police Officer Memorial Ceremony which will be held on Saturday, May 9, 2009 beginning at 9:00 AM. The new Law Enforcement/Fire Fighter Memorial, located at 1000 North Wells Street will be the setting for this year’s “tribute”. Please join Mayor Henry, family members, city, county officials, public safety personnel and the citizens of Fort Wayne as we remember the lives and deaths of these heroes.

While the Memorial will be completed later this summer, its progress to date will enable us all to be proud of this setting and the community that has come forward to give the memory of these heroes their long awaited home of dignity.

(Rain or Shine)

*Cake and refreshments will be served after the ceremony*

** Please make note that the Ceremony will begin at 9:00 AM. (Not 11:00, as in the past) This will allow attendees to make other plans for the remaining day.

Thank you,

Law Enforcement/Fire Fighter Memorial

Board of Directors           

Jerry Vandeveer       Linda Vandeveer
Sgt. Steven Sorgen    Capt. Bradley Kohrman
Capt. Dennis Giere  Capt. James Feasel
Sgt. Jack Woodruff

April 24, 2009

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK

Sarah Jones and Daniel Roy Barrett

Both made the supreme sacrifice in 2008

April 22, 2009

Trooper Returns to Work after Serving Combat Tour

Peru---Recently, Indiana State Police Senior Trooper Joe Swisher returned to work patrolling the roads of Miami County. He recently served a two month long combat tour in southwest Asia as a member of the 72nd Air Refueling Squadron. The squadron is part of the 434th Air Refueling Wing stationed out of Grissom Air Reserve Base, Bunker Hill, IN.

Trooper Swisher’s squadron conducted in flight refueling missions for coalition aircraft over Iraq and Afghanistan. They flew approximately 40 combat missions. Swisher served as an in flight refueler, or better known as a boom operator, during the squadron’s missions. He holds the rank of technical sergeant.

Swisher has completed 16 years of military service. He served four years as a infantry soldier in the United States Army, and has completed 12 years in the United States Air Force Reserve. This was his second combat tour. In 2003, he served six months in Kuwait as a security police officer for the Air Force Reserve.

Senior Trooper Swisher is a 14 year veteran of the Indiana State Police. He resides in Wabash County with his wife, Debbie, and their two daughters.

********************************

Indiana State Police Oldest Living Retiree

Edward Raholin PE19

April 21, 2009

Indiana Toll Road 3rd Annual Charity Golf Outing

June 29th @ Knollwood Country Club

GRANGER---We are excited to announce that the Indiana Toll Road is sponsoring its third-annual charity golf outing, to be held this year on Monday, June 29th! Beneficiaries for this event were selected to be the Indiana Troopers Association and the Indiana State Police District 21, whose duties both support, encourage and provide services to all residents of Indiana and beyond.

The Indiana Troopers Association (ITA) supports its members and their families with benefits, services and advocacy, including death benefits to the beneficiaries of those killed in the line of duty while serving our state. In addition, the ITA supports the community through annual state-wide programs and contributes to many child-focused efforts. Funds raised for the ITA will go toward aiding the far-reaching effects of the ITA members’ community contributions.

The Indiana State Police District 21 (Toll Road District) works side-by-side with the Indiana Toll Road to serve the community of Northern Indiana in terms of safety, patrol and prevention.

The ISP provides 24-hour police surveillance throughout the entire 157-mile road, and in the past several years has increased its number of officers to which it has almost doubled the staff. The ISP is able to provide its services without interference, while ITRCC works with the force by maintaining an open dialogue concerning road construction projects, upgrades, new technology on the road, etc., which in the end allows both groups to do their jobs effectively. Funds raised for the ISP will go to purchase new equipment and gear not eligible to be covered by government funding.

The golf outing will be held at the Knollwood Country Club.  Registration fee for the golf outing is $150 per person or $600 per team.  Knollwood is located at 18633 Baywood Lane, Granger, Indiana. 

In addition to your participation in the golf outing, we are asking for your support in providing hole, beverage cart and lunch/appetizer sponsorships.

Please make your check payable to ITR Concession Company LLC.  Mail check & registration form to:

ITR Concession Company LLC

Attn:  Sally Witt

52551 Ash Road

Granger, IN 46530

Please RSVP no later than June 11, 2009

April 17, 2009

Joe Swisher is a Trooper assigned to the Peru Post with patrol duties in Miami county.

These photos were taken while he was serving with the United States Air Force in Iraq.

Joe Swisher was photographed holding an Indiana State Police patch for Dan Barrett that was flown over Baghdad on a combat mission. Also included is one taken of Joe out on the wing holding the patch before we took off. Sorry it is kinda dark but we are the Lords of the night!! In other words we got stuck on the late shift!! I hope Dan's family as well as you all enjoy the pictures. I can't wait to get back on the open road. Miss you all!!!

Joseph L Swisher

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Settlement Reached in Wrongful Death Suit

of Indiana State Police Lieutenant Gary Dudley

Indianapolis---On August 22, 2006 Indiana State Police Lieutenant Gary Dudley and Deputy Chief Gary Martin of the Lake County Sheriff’s Department were killed in a tragic crash in western Indiana on S.R. 63 south of I-74 in Vermillion County.  The crash occurred while both men, along with other active and retired law enforcement professionals, were participating in a charity bicycle ride to raise funds for the Indiana Chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS.)  The COPS organization raises money and awareness for families of fallen Indiana law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. 

After months of work and weeks of negotiations, a successful settlement has been reached in the wrongful death action suit brought by Carolyn Dudley, the widow of Gary Dudley, against Towne Air Freight.  Prior to this confidential settlement the case was scheduled to proceed to a jury trial on August 10, 2009 in Newport, Indiana

A portion of this settlement will be donated by Mrs. Dudley and her counsel, Roy Tabor of Tabor Law Firm, to make a substantial contribution to the existing Gary Dudley Memorial Scholarship Fund (GDMSF) which perpetuates the memory of Gary Dudley and the charitable works he began during his life. 

Inquiries about this release may be directed to Carolyn Dudley’s attorney, Roy Tabor, at 317-236-9000 or to Mrs. Dudley’s designated spokesman and family friend, David Bursten, at 317-407-6610. 

Gary Dudley Memorial Scholarship Fund

The Gary Dudley Memorial Scholarship Fund (GDMSF) was created to financially assist children of fallen officers throughout the State of Indiana with the costs of their children’s post-secondary educational pursuits.  These scholarships are awarded annually by a Board of Directors that include Carolyn Dudley and her attorney Roy Tabor.  Surviving children of Indiana based law enforcement officers from the city, county, state or federal level are encouraged to apply. 

Persons interested in applying for a scholarship may obtain an application through the Indiana State Police Alliance at 1415 Shelby Street, Indianapolis, Indiana  46203, phone number 317-636-0929.  Donations to the GDMSF may also be sent to the same address. 

Since the foundation’s inception in 2007, over $26,000 has been awarded through the nine scholarships thus far presented to children of fallen law enforcement officers across Indiana.

April 15, 2009

Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division Golf Outing

The 2009 Annual Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division Golf Outing is just around the corner.  Get your foursome together and come join in the fun.  Interested groups or individuals needing placed on a team should contact Division Secretary Betty Parrott @ 317-615-7420.

Please forward this announcement to any retiree, or former employee you may know and invite them to join us too!

Respectfully,

L. Wayne Andrews,

Captain CVED

********************************

April 09, 2009

        INDIANA STATE POLICE PERSONNEL RECEIVE

       COMMERCIAL VEHICLE DRUG INTERDICTION TRAINING

Indianapolis---Inspectors and troopers assigned to the Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division (CVED) just recently completed D.I.A.P. training. D.I.A.P. is “Drug Interdiction Assistance Program”, a training program provided by the National Training Center which is free of charge to agencies requesting the training. The training focuses on detection of drugs being transported by commercial vehicles. Since Indiana is considered the “Crossroads of America” an extreme amount of commercial vehicles traverse our interstates and highways daily.

Thirty one Motor Carrier Inspectors (MCI) and eight Troopers received 40 hours of classroom instruction and another 24 hours of on the job training. The week after the classroom instruction was completed students manned weigh stations around Indiana. The weigh stations at Terre Haute, Connersville, Seymour, and Versailles served as the locations for the students to work on their new found skills. At the Terre Haute location there were nine students who completed the training and an instructor from the National Training Center. The students included five MCI’s and four troopers. Also a State Police K-9 unit was assigned to each location.

In the classroom, students are instructed to observe for certain indicators which could be a clue as to whether the commercial vehicle may be hauling illegal drugs. At the weigh stations the students used this new knowledge and observed for those indicators.

The Indiana State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division will continue its efforts to make Indiana’s roadways safer. These newly trained MCI’s and troopers will carry this valuable training back to their respective districts to continue the fight against illegal drugs being transported across Indiana’s interstates and highways.        

April 08, 2009

Peru Post Increases Man Power by One

Trooper Luke Bowyer

PeruRecently, the Indiana State Police Peru Post increased its man power with the addition of Trooper Luke Bowyer who transferred from the Indiana State Police Post in Indianapolis. Bowyer is a member of the 68th Indiana State Police Recruit Academy which graduated in December of 2007. The Indianapolis District was his first duty station where he patrolled primarily in Marion County.

Bowyer is a Fulton County native and 2000 graduate of Caston High School. He served three years as a combat engineer in the United States Army. In 2003, he completed a six month tour in Iraq as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Prior to joining the Indiana State Police, Bowyer was employed as a line worker for an RV manufacturer.

Bowyer resides in Fulton County with his wife Courtney.  He is assigned to patrol primarily in Miami County.

“Thus far in his career, Trooper Bowyer has proven himself to be a professional and dedicated public servant,” stated Lieutenant Matt Bilkey, commander of the Indiana State Police Peru Post. “He is a welcomed addition to the Peru District.”

Anyone wanting information about a career with the Indiana State Police is asked to contact Sergeant Tony Slocum at 1-800-382-0689 or visit the Indiana State Police website at http://www.in.gov/index.htm

April 07, 2009

Indiana StateTrooper's family files suit

Trooper Daniel Barret

PERU---On Jan. 27, 2008, Indiana State Trooper Daniel Barrett was killed in crash as he tried to catch up with a traffic violator on U.S. 31 in Fulton County.

Fourteen months later, his family still mourns and grieves the loss of Barrett, a 25-year-old Logansport native.

It was during one of their visits to Mount Hope Cemetery in Logansport that family members noticed standing water was eroding and damaging Barrett's grave. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the City of Logansport.

Logansport attorney and Barrett's brother, Matthew Barrett, said additional dirt was placed on a nearby grave, causing water to run off onto his brother's grave.

In March, Matthew Barrett, on behalf of his parents - Vincent and Sarah Barrett - filed a civil lawsuit in Cass County Superior Court I against the city, Mount Hope Cemetery, sexton Michael Nicoll and Betty McDonald.

The Barretts, in the lawsuit, claim McDonald had Nicoll put the dirt on her late husband's grave last August, making the site more “aesthetically pleasing,” causing a “significant amount of surface water drainage and ponding on Trooper Barrett's grave site.”

Matthew Barrett said, “We have tried several times to resolve the case before the lawsuit was filed. My mother and father spoke with Mrs. McDonald twice. Nothing has been done.

“We always get the same story, from (McDonald's son, James) who's a landscaper, said the extra dirt would be fine.

“We filed a tort claim late last year and nothing happened. This was the last thing my parents wanted to do was file a claim.”

The family makes frequent visits to the grave, Matthew Barrett said, and drainage is one thing they would not have to worry about.

The family believes removing the dirt will resolve the problem.

McDonald declined to comment on the lawsuit.

“I want to say, however, that my heart goes out to this family,” she said. “This is a horrible experience, losing your son while he was serving the public.

“Our sympathies go to the family.”

The lawsuit seeks to have the dirt from McDonald's grave removed, along with court cost and $2,000 compensation for emotional distress and grief.

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The Evansville Area Retiree’s will be meeting for a Bi Monthly Luncheon

The Evansville Area Retiree’s will be meeting for a Bi Monthly Luncheon on Tuesday, April 7 at 11:00 AM (Evansville Time).  The location is at CJ’s Restaurant, at the Willow Lanes Bowling Alley.  It is located on Virginia Street just east of US 41.  Come join us.

April 06, 2009

Trooper Completes Vehicle Terrorist and Criminal Interdiction Training

Senior Trooper Dan Hearon

PUTNAMVILLE---Recently, in a continuing effort to keep Hoosiers safe, Indiana State Police Senior Trooper Dan Hearon attended and completed a four day Passenger Vehicle Terrorist and Criminal Interdiction Course. The course was held in French Lick, IN, and was conducted by Desert Snow LLC.

All police officers know that criminals use America’s roadways to conduct a host of criminal activities. The training instructed by Desert Snow LLC, was designed to provide officers with professional and legal roadside tactics to help them identify terrorists and major smugglers while conducting everyday patrol responsibilities. At the completion of the training, officers were armed with the skills necessary to identify and remove terrorists, drug-smugglers, and other individuals who utilize Indiana roads to perpetuate criminal activity. The 32 hours of training was conducted in three phases. Officers were taught concealment methods, detection methods, legal vehicle stops, and indicators of terrorist and criminal activities. They were exposed to over 200 different types of natural and constructed concealment methods containing simulated weapons of mass destruction, explosives, military ordinances, illegal drugs, and currency.

Officers also received specialized training covering professional interdiction tactics regarding commercial motor vehicles, rental vehicles, and other large vehicles used by terrorists, drug smugglers, and other criminals.

The Desert Snow Training Advanced Highway Criminal Interdiction training program was established in 1989. Since then, Desert Snow has trained over 30,000 officer’s world wide. The Indiana Criminal Justice Institute provided the necessary funds for officers to attend the training.

April 05, 2009

ISP Sgt. David and Jan Lloyd's

daughter home from Iraq

Tiffany Lloyd USMC

Hello from Sunny California!

It is amazing to be back in the USA experiencing springtime in beautiful California!  The spring colors are more vibrant than ever and spending time listening to and watching the ocean has been awesome.  The past couple of weeks have been filled with decompressing, getting adjusted to life in the States, taking care of logistical odds and ends, as well as finishing up my work with 1st Maintenance Battalion.  Of course, I’ve spent my fair share of time enjoying the outdoors as well!

Right now, my big question is, “Where at Camp Pendleton will I end up working?”  There are 2 units who currently have my name on their incoming personnel report.  I hope the details are worked out by the time I come back from leave later in the month!  I’ll either return to where I was working prior to deployment (Combat Logistics Regiment 15) or I’ll be with 1st MLG G-6 working as the Operations Alpha in Communications for the MLG.  They are two very different positions and both have advantages and disadvantages.  I’m up for either one, I’m just ready to have it figured out so I can get settled back into a work routine when I get back from leave in Indiana.

My current challenge is training physically and mentally for the San Diego Rock n’ Roll Marathon I’m running with a friend on May 31st.  It will be his 5th marathon and my 1st.  We’ve been having a good time training the past couple of weeks, going from my longest run of 7 ½ miles to 10 then 12 miles.  This coming week is 14!  I’m scheduled for a 16 miler while I’m home if anyone’s interested in joining me! J

Again, I want to thank each of you for your prayers, thoughts, cards, packages, and all around support throughout the deployment.  It is an incredible blessing to have wonderful friends and family like you!  You helped make the deployment a good experience and I am very thankful for you!

By the way, I’m headed to Indiana April 9-18 and would enjoy seeing as many of you in the area as possible!

Take Care and God Bless!

Serving God and Our Country,

Tiffany

April 04, 2009

Young Indiana state trooper saluted a decade after slaying

FORT WAYNE---It was 10 years to the day since state police Trooper Cory Elson was shot to death in Decatur, and on Friday the Adams County dispatcher who handled the calls still remembers the conversation he had with the yoUng trooper just minutes before his slaying.

  “I had been coaching soCcer for my son’s team,” Darin Line said.

“He mentioned that he liked soccer and wanted to know how to get involved.”

No more than 10 minutes after Elson left the dispatch center, Line said, he stopped Mark L. Lichtenberger next to Advance Auto Parts in Decatur for a traffic violation. Lichtenberger later pleaded guilty to spraying the 26-year-old trooper with 37 bullets from a retrofitted automatic rifle before driving away.

Lichtenberger is serving life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Elson’s mother, father, sister and widow joined dozens of state troopers at the Indiana State Police Fort Wayne post for a memorial ceremony Friday morning to remember April 3, 1999, when Elson was murdered in the line of duty.

The trooper’s death forever changed the lives of every person Elson touched, Sgt. Ron Galaviz told the crowd of troopers who stood at attention in precise rows.

That is certainly true for Line, who attended Friday’s ceremony.

He can still vividly remember the feelings that welled within him, even if some of the details have been lost in the frenzy of activity Line endured that day and during the ensuing manhunt.

Elson was a rookie when he was killed, less than four months out of the academy. Were it not for his untimely death, he would have been recognized last December as a senior trooper for 10 years of service, Galaviz said. Line had just more than a year of experience as a dispatcher that night.

He is now a veteran who has handled countless tragedies.

All the same, Elson’s slaying sticks with him. Line’s response to the shooting is part of the training for the Adams County dispatch center, and every new dispatcher knows who Elson is, he said.

In the same way, Elson’s legacy lives on in every trooper in the state police, Galaviz said.

The Adams County Fraternal Order of Police lodge will have its own ceremony for Elson at 2 p.m. today at the Decatur Police Department, 521 N. Third St.

April 03, 2009

Local Officers Complete Vehicle Terrorist and Criminal Interdiction Training

Indiana State Police Trooper Josh Maller and Wabash County Sheriff’s Deputy Terri Rzasa

PERU---Recently, in a continuing effort to keep Hoosiers safe, Indiana State Police Trooper Josh Maller and Wabash County Sheriff’s Deputy Terri Rzasa attended and completed a four day Passenger Vehicle Terrorist and Criminal Interdiction Course. The course was held in French Lick, IN, and was conducted by Desert Snow LLC.

All police officers know that criminals use America’s roadways to conduct a host of criminal activities. The training instructed by Desert Snow LLC, was designed to provide officers with professional and legal roadside tactics to help them identify terrorists and major smugglers while conducting everyday patrol responsibilities. At the completion of the training, officers were armed with the skills necessary to identify and remove terrorists, drug-smugglers, and other individuals who utilize Indiana roads to perpetuate criminal activity. The 32 hours of training was conducted in three phases. Officers were taught concealment methods, detection methods, legal vehicle stops, and indicators of terrorist and criminal activities. They were exposed to over 200 different types of natural and constructed concealment methods containing simulated weapons of mass destruction, explosives, military ordinances, illegal drugs, and currency.

Officers also received specialized training covering professional interdiction tactics regarding commercial motor vehicles, rental vehicles, and other large vehicles used by terrorists, drug smugglers, and other criminals.

The Desert Snow Training Advanced Highway Criminal Interdiction training program was established in 1989. Since then, Desert Snow has trained over 30,000 officers world wide. The Indiana Criminal Justice Institute provided the necessary funds for local officers to attend the training.

April 01, 2009

Indiana Supreme Court affirms Tommy Pruitt’s conviction, death sentence

INDIANAPOLIS---Janice Starnes was extremely happy when she heard the news that the Indiana Supreme Court had affirmed the conviction and death sentence for the man who shot and killed her husband.

“It’s good news. It’s the way it should be,” she said. “He is evil, that’s why he did it.”

Pruitt was convicted in October 2003 for the June 14, 2001, shooting death of County Warrant Officer Dan Starnes, who had stopped Pruitt for erratic driving on Wilbur Road.

Pruitt had appealed both his conviction and the denial of his post conviction relief petition to the Indiana Supreme Court. Pruitt contended during his trial that his below-average intellectual capacity made him ineligible for the death penalty. The trial court judge ordered a mental health examination that revealed Pruitt was not so mentally impaired that he could not legally stand trial for murder or face the possibility of the death sentence. Pruitt was convicted of murder, attempted murder, possession of a handgun without a license, resisting law enforcement, four counts of receiving stolen property, and aggravated battery. The judge gave Pruitt the death penalty for the murder charge, and 115 years for the other charges.

Pruitt filed a petition for post conviction relief and a change of judge in the case. The trial judge denied the request for a new judge and denied the request for post conviction relief. Pruitt’s attorneys then went to the Indiana Court of Appeals, which also affirmed the decision.

Pruitt’s attorney then filed a motion in the Indiana Supreme Court to have his conviction overturned. On Tuesday afternoon, the court issued its decision. Pruitt has other legal avenues open to him. He can now file in the United State’s District Court, the United States Court of Appeals and the United States Supreme Court.

Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller commented Tuesday on the ruling also.

“Engraved in stone on a memorial wall outside the Indiana Statehouse are the names of police officers such as Daniel Starnes who died in the line of duty while protecting the public,” Zoeller said. “We owe it to Deputy Starnes and other fallen officers to ensure that justice is carried out at every level of the appellate process.”

The Office of the Indiana Attorney General represented the state in the criminal appeal. “A post-conviction relief petition is a double check to ensure that the original trial was fair and reliable and the defendant’s constitutional rights were properly observed,” Zoeller added. “Tuesday’s decision shows the trial-court judge was fair and that defendant Pruitt was accorded all the protections he was due under law.”

“Rulings earlier in the Pruitt case were extremely consequential, in light of the subsequent decision by the United States Supreme Court in the case of Atkins v. Virginia that executing individuals with substantially below-average intellectual capacity would violate the Eighth Amendment,” Zoeller noted. “Tuesday’s ruling by the Indiana Supreme Court validates what we knew all along: that Pruitt had the benefit of skilled legal representation that left no stone unturned in mounting a thorough defense at his trial. His underlying conviction and sentence should not be reversed, and thankfully were not,” Zoeller added.

March 28, 2009

Indiana state trooper struck in Indianapolis

INDIANAPOLIS---An Indiana State Trooper was struck early this morning while working a DUI saturation patrol.

The crash happened on the south side of Indianapolis along US 31 just north of I-465. State troopers and officers assigned to the Marion County Traffic Safety Partnership were conducting saturation patrols observing for drunk or impaired drivers.

Trooper Christopher Townsend, 27, assigned to the Indianapolis district, had a suspected drunk driver stopped along US 31 just north of Lawrence Avenue.

A northbound 2002 Toyota pick-up truck, driven by Miguel Xicara, 35, Indianapolis, struck the rear of the state police car occupied by Trooper Townsend.

Xicara’s truck then traveled through the median, across the southbound lanes of US 31, and came to rest in a ditch on the west side of US 31. Trooper Townsend was transported to Methodist Hospital with non life threatening injuries.

Trooper Townsend is a December 2008 graduate of the Indiana State Police academy.

Miguel Xicara showed signs of intoxication but refused a certified chemical test for intoxication. A warrant from Marion County Court was obtained and a blood sample was taken from Xicara. Those test results are pending. Xicara meanwhile has been preliminarily charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated with a prior conviction, operating while intoxicated causing injury, and driving while suspended.

The investigation is continuing. Indiana State Police were assisted at the scene by IMPD and the Indianapolis Fire Department. Investigating officer is Trooper Dan Madison.

SAFETY REMINDER TO ALL DRIVERS

Motorists MUST change lanes away from the emergency vehicle if they can do it SAFELY, if not they must SLOW DOWN and proceed with caution.

March 26, 2009

Trooper Cory R. Elson To Be Remembered on 10th Anniversary

Trooper Cory R. Elson

Shaun Armes of District 22 reports the following up date on memorial dates/locations for Cory R Elson.

I just wanted to drop you a line quick and let you know about a second Memorial Service planned for Trooper Cory Elson.  On Saturday April 4 at 1400 hrs, the Adams County Fraternal Order of Police will hold a brief ceremony at the Decatur Police Department, 521 N. 3rd St.  As of Tuesday evening when I spoke with the FOP pesident, Amy and Cory's parents plan to attend.  If you could put something out on the website it would be greatly appreciated.  If any questions please contact me at 260-724-7663.  Thanks again for all you do for us troops!  It does not go un-noticed. 

**************************************

Indiana State Police to implement Facebook policy

INDIANAPOLIS---An investigation into what State and Metro Police describe as questionable content posted on the internet is leading to new policies.

Tuesday night, 13 Investigates reported photos and content posted by a trooper on his Facebook page. Officer Chris Pestow is now facing an internal investigation and possible disciplinary action for what he posted, including pictures and information about his activity as a state officer. Investigators want to know if some of the information was posted while he was on duty.

State Police say it's developing a new written policy on such behavior to clarify what information is off limits for posting on the internet.

"Any information that would be department related or embarrass the department will probably be prohibited from being placed on your personal web page," said Major Carlos Pettiford.

ISP says it was working on the policy even before it learned of Trooper Pestow's website.

March 25, 2009

Indiana state trooper in trouble over Facebook photos

INDIANAPOLIS---An Indiana State Trooper is under investigation for what some call compromising photos and statements he posted on the Internet.

Police say what 13 Investigates found on Trooper Chris Pestow's personal Facebook page is embarrassing and might even be against the law. Some of the entries showed Pestow with a .357 Magnum pointed at his head, drinking what he described as lots of beer with his buddies and lewd horseplay.

Over the past several months, Pestow has used his Facebook page to brag of heavy drinking. He also posted pictures of a crash involving his ISP cruiser.

"Oops, where did my front end go?" he wrote in one entry. Later, he told his friends, "Kiss my butt, not my fault."

And he isn't shy about sharing his views of police work, referring to himself as not a state trooper, but as a "garbage man" who "picks up trash for a living."

When it comes to people who resist arrest and threaten police officers, Pestow wrote, "Let someone, homeless or not, try to stab me with a pen, knife, spoon, etc., not only will he fail, he'll probably end up shot. These people should have died when they were young anyway, I'm just doing them a favor."

Eyewitness News interviewed Pestow in December 2008 while he was responding to traffic accidents on an icy stretch of I-465. He wasn't happy about the icy conditions and we know that because later that night he wrote, "Chris Pestow is very mad at whoever is responsible for this awful weather" on his Facebook page.

Now, the Indiana State Police may be very mad at him.

"There has been an internal investigation started," said ISP Major Carlos Pettiford.

The state's biggest concern is that Trooper Pestow may have been Facebook-ing while you were paying for it.

On February 11th at 2 a.m., Pestow was supposed to be on duty when he wrote on his Facebook page, "Chris Pestow is NOT working in the rain."

On February 19th at 3:22 a.m., while working his overnight shift, he logged onto Facebook and wrote, "It's cold and snowing and I can't possibly work in these conditions."

And on November 28th at 1:20 in the morning, the officer was supposed to be on duty when he wrote, "Chris Pestow is keeping the mean streets of Fishers safe and free of trash."

A friend quickly responded to that post.

"Hmmmm. How are you keeping the streets safe if u r on Facebook?" the friend wrote.

"That's a clear violation. We know that right off the bat. When they're working, that's exactly what they're supposed to be doing is working," said Major Pettiford.

Pestow isn't the only one who is now facing possible punishment. The man holding the gun to his head in one of the photos is also a police officer. Andrew Deddish works for the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department and officials there are not happy with the picture.

"We're trained [that] we don't point firearms at anything we don't plan to shoot," said IMPD Sgt. Paul Thompson.

Sgt. Thompson said Deddish is now facing an internal investigation, because pointing a gun at someone is against state law and because he says a police officer should know better.

"It's embarrassing. We're always under public scrutiny. We hold a position that's a trust to the public. You're expected to act accordingly," Sgt. Thompson said.

Pestow did remove his Facebook page from the Internet late Monday afternoon, but not before 13 Investigates, State Police and IMPD had a very good look at it. Officials told Eyewitness News both officers will remain on duty while their departments conduct internal investigations, which will probably take several weeks.

Police say it's a powerful reminder to all of us - don't put anything on the Internet that you would not want to see on the news.

March 24, 2009

Toll Road Provides Assistance To Trooper's Family

Aubrey Anderson

ISP Toll Road Commander Lt. Dallard Tackett is shown presenting approximately $5,000 to Trooper Caleb Anderson to help with expenses related to Anderson's 3 yr. old daughter, Aubrey's treatment for leukemia.  Anderson was assigned to the Toll Road when his little girl was diagnosed shortly after the holidays.    The Indiana Toll Road Commission Company sponsored a Soup Luncheon, a Raffle, and Jean's Days to raise the funds to help the young trooper and his family.

    Trp. Anderson has been reassigned to the Ft. Wayne Post so that he can be closer to his family during Aubrey's treatment.

    Our thanks to the ITRCC and the Toll Road family for this wonderful gesture of support.

ISP Toll Road Commander Lt. Dallard Tackett presenting check to Trooper Caleb Anderson

*****************************

Larry Clendenin PE930 retired from the Redkey post

is in Shands Hospital in Gainsville, Florida

Larry Clendenin PE930

.   He has an aneurysm on the Aorta and it is very serious.

They are not operating now but are trying to control his blood pressure to keep from operating.

They air lifted him from Palatka to Shands and said he needed surgery immediately. Shands is doing some more scans and think they may not have to operate. He will be in the hospital for seven to ten days to try to control his blood pressure. He has a lot of restrictions on what he will be allowed to do.

*******************************

Hanzel Barclay PE 1746 retired

from the Sellersburg Post had a heart attack

Hanzel Barclay PE 1746

Hanzel Barclay PE 1746 retired 5-18-95 from the Sellersburg Post had a heart attack on Friday March 20th.  Hanzel is in critical but stable condition in the ICU at the Floyd Memorial Hospital, New Albany, IN Floyd Co.  Hanzel has two (2) sons David & Tim both motorcycle units @ the Sellersburg Post.

March 20, 2009

Trooper Cory R. Elson To Be Remembered on 10th Anniversary

Trooper Cory R. Elson

The Fort Wayne ISP Post is hosting a Memorial Service for Trooper Cory R. Elson on the 10th Anniversary of his untimely death in the line of duty.   Elson was on routine patrol in Decatur  on April 3, 1999 when he was fatally shot.   His friends, family and fellow officers are invited to attend this memorial service which will begin at 11:00am at the Ft. Wayne Post, 5811 Ellison Road, Fort. Wayne.   Remarks of remembrance from fellow officers, prayers, and a flag ceremony will be included in the service, which will be followed by a carry-in lunch for all who attend.  For more information, contact Master Trooper Brian Bills at the Ft. Wayne Post  - 800-522-0976.

March 19, 2009

INDOT asked to name I-74 segment for late trooper

Trooper Richard G. Brown

A one-mile section of Interstate 74 in southern Boone County could soon be named for an Indiana State Police trooper killed on duty in 1967.

The Indiana General Assembly Tuesday approved a joint resolution for the Richard G. Brown Memorial Highway, between mile markers 53 and 54. The resolution asks the Indiana Department of Transportation to place marker signs along the interstate.

“I appreciated that these people did that,” said Brown’s daughter, Lisa Garoffolo.

Brown and two passengers died on Sept. 27, 1967, as they sat in his cruiser following a traffic accident.

Garoffolo; her husband, Lebanon Police Chief Tom Garoffolo; their daughter, Emily; her brother, Mark Brown; her sister, Bonnie Spielman; and others attended ceremonies in the House and Senate. The five legislators representing parts of Boone County also were at the ceremony, she said.

The resolution was introduced by Sen. Phil Boots and sponsored in the House by Rep. Jeff Thompson.

“This honor is long overdue,” Thompson said.


Trooper Michael Greene

Last August, a section of I-65 south of Lebanon was named the “Mike Greene Memorial Highway” in honor of ISP Master Trooper Michael Greene, who was murdered on Feb. 3, 1993. His killer, Norman C. Timberlake, was sentenced to execution but died in prison.

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Trooper’s termination upheld by state appeals court

INDIANAPOLIS---The Indiana Court of Appeals upheld a Steuben Superior Court decision affirming a former Indiana State Police trooper’s firing.

Scott Schwartz requested judicial review of his termination from the state police in September 2007, claiming he was unjustly fired on Dec. 14, 2006, by Superintendent Paul Whitesell. After Steuben Superior Court Judge William Fee agreed with the Indiana State Police Board’s finding that the firing was appropriate, Schwartz appealed. The appeals court again affirmed the decision Monday.

The termination stemmed from a 911 call Schwartz made to report a break-in at his Hamilton Lake home on Aug. 7, 2006. According to a court document, that evening Schwartz and two women were in a boat near his home on Hamilton Lake, returning to the house in the early morning hours. The boyfriend of one of the women, Lee William White, came to the house and was admitted by Schwartz to find both women nude in the bathroom.

According to court documents, a scuffle between Schwartz and White ensued and White left. When he returned to the house, he threw a clay pot at the front entrance and Schwartz called the authorities.

Indiana State Police and Hamilton Police Department officers responded, and were told White was attempting to break in. According to court documents, Schwartz did not reveal the boating excursion from earlier that morning, and told police the two women had come to his house to report a domestic disturbance. He then claimed White came to his home and kicked at the door.

The women were determined to be intoxicated and interviewed several days later, said the report.

White was arrested and posted a $500 bond for his release from Steuben County Jail on Aug. 7, 2006. On Dec. 1, 2006, Steuben County Prosecutor’s Office confirmed no charges would be filed against him and his bond was returned.

State police investigators claim to have recorded a conversation between White and Schwartz on Aug. 9, 2006, in which Schwartz asked White to convince the women to change their stories to conform with Schwartz’ original statements to police. During the conversation, White brought up the threatened criminal charges against him, and how Schwartz had opened the door for him. In response, Schwartz stated, “Well and I’m going to take care of that, too,” court document said.

In November 2006, Whitesell filed disciplinary charges against Schwartz that included interfering with a case by providing false information and by contacting White to talk about police statements, making a false report and falsely conveying information to detectives about his house being broken into. After a hearing, Schwartz was fired Dec. 14, 2006.

Fee affirmed the ISP board’s review of Whitesell’s administrative actions, though Schwartz claimed motions he’d made in order to accumulate evidence on his behalf were not ruled on. He also said the board’s findings were not specific enough.

“Here the board’s findings give a procedural history of the case, set forth the specific charges against Schwartz, including specific ISP personnel rules violations and the actions constituting the violations, and give a detailed narrative of the events, in most instances referring to the specific piece of evidence upon which the board was relying,” said the appeals court decision.

Schwartz also argued that the board’s decision was “arbitrary and capricious” and not supported by evidence. While the appeals court’s job is not review the administrative determination in the case, it did find that the state police board’s finding was based on “substantial evidence.”

March 18, 2009

Two New Troopers Begin Solo Patrol at the Lafayette Post

After successfully completing 22 weeks at the Indiana State Police Academy in Plainfield and 15 weeks of field training, Troopers Wendell Beachy and Sean Schaefer received their cars on the 11th of March in Indianapolis and are now patrolling area roadways.  Trooper Beachy will be patrolling White and Carroll Counties and Schaefer will be patrolling Tippecanoe and Clinton Counties.

New troopers receive approximately 840 hours of structured training in law enforcement techniques. Their curriculum includes 80 hours of criminal law instruction, 50 hours of vehicle operations training, 30 hours of psychology and 40 hours of “Survival Spanish.”  They also developed skills in criminal investigation, vehicle crash investigation and impaired driver prevention and detection.

Trooper Wendell Beachy

Wendell Beachy, 26, is a native of Amboy, IN.  After receiving his G.E.D. he continued his education and received an Associate Degree from Indiana University at Kokomo in Criminal Justice.  Beachy went on to Ivy Tech and received a degree in Design Technology.  He resides in Lafayette with his wife, Elizabeth and their daughter.

Trooper Sean Schaefer

Sean Schaefer, 25, from Angola, IN graduated from Angola High School and went on to spend three years at Ball State University.  He then returned home to work at Wenzel Metal Spinning before going to work for Steuben County Sheriff’s Department as a jailer in 2005.  Schaefer resides in W. Lafayette with his wife Amber.

Lieutenant Jay Janke, Commander of the Lafayette District, said “With the help from these two new recruits, we at the Lafayette Post can better serve the people of Indiana.”

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Indiana State Police Det. Scott Jarvis solves cold case

Missing man found after 15 years

Brookville native reunited with family

Cold cases of missing persons ordinarily don't have warm endings after 15 years. But this one does.

BROOKVILLE---Brookville native Monty Stutzman was found last week in Mississippi after months of investigative work by Indiana State Police Det. Scott Jarvis.

The 10-year veteran from Henry County has been a detective for five years with the Connersville District of the Indiana State Police. He patrolled Wayne County for four years before that.

Stutzman was reunited with his father, David, and sister, Dawn Gindling, last weekend in Courtland, Miss.

"This is a pretty rare one from my experience to be gone this long and to be found alive," Jarvis said Tuesday. "It was a good case. I'm glad it turned out for the best. You always hope for the best."

He said the closure solves one of two long-term active cases under investigation by the district. The other is that of Denise Pflum, who has been missing since March 1986.

Jarvis reopened the Stutzman case last August. Stutzman was reported missing by his family at age 23 in 1993.

Jarvis discovered a driver's license obtained in South Carolina in the mid-1990s using Stutzman's Social Security number. Family members thought the photo on the license was his -- but not a recent one from Mississippi, Jarvis said.

The mystery was solved with phone calls to Stutzman, who confirmed his identity to investigators in Mississippi and to family members.

"The father and sister came in," Jarvis said. "Obviously, they are elated. I can only imagine what it feels like."

Stutzman is married and has worked full time for years. He told investigators in Mississippi that he disappeared because he faced a theft charge while on probation for a burglary conviction.

Stutzman could face charges in Mississippi for living under an assumed identity.

But the charges in Indiana have been dropped by Franklin County prosecutor Mel Wilhelm. The main reasons: the investigating officer and the victim have since died.

"That's the oldest one (case) we had on the books," he said Tuesday. "There's no sense holding a pending charge."

March 17, 2009

Indiana State Police Honors Those Who Gave All

as amended

Redkey's date has been changed from 5/19/09 to 5/18/09

The month of May is designated as National Police Officers Month.  Each year the Indiana State Police honor the officers who have given their lives in the line of duty in our state.   Post memorials are open to the public and are usually followed by a luncheon.   ISP retirees and family membersare especially encouraged to attend the memorial programs.  During the service, the names of the fallen officers are read, followed by briefremarks of their final ISP detail.   Please join the ISP this year in honoring those who served with pride.

March 16, 2009

Indiana COPS website up and running

They have been on our link page for a long time

Check 'em out.

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I wanted to inform you that the NEW Indiana COPS Website www.indianacops.org is no longer under construction and is up and running.

Cops Cycling has a link which has our Sponsor and Registration forms ready for download.

Thanks for all you do for our Surivivors,

Rich Crawford

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IRS Publication 15-T and the "Making Work Pay" Tax Credit

         Last week, the IRS issued Publication 15-T, regarding the new withholding tables designed to accelerate the benefit of the "Making Work Pay" tax credit passed under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, effective February 17, 2009.  The Publication formalized the IRS position that the new withholding tables are to apply to pensions in addition to wages.  Governmental plans should be aware of the impact of the new tables on two separate groups: (1) employees receiving wages under the plan's payroll, and (2) retirees and/or their beneficiaries receiving monthly benefit payments from the plan. The IRS asks that the new tables be imp[lemented as soon as possible but no later than April 1, 2009.

March 15, 2009

Randy Speidell finds growth in near-death experience

‘I was floating away’

AUBURN---First, he felt himself floating away. Then, he felt somebody pull him back to earth.

Randy Speidell of Angola thought he was “pretty much history” after he lost control of his vehicle on an icy road and struck a utility pole in what doctors said should have been a fatal accident.

But, he said, “The power of prayer of prayer is an awesome thing,” and he believes his near-death experience caused him to grow in his faith.

Speidell returned home last week after spending 57 days at Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne.

Speidell, 53, his newlywed wife, Debra Deuter-Speidell, and her daughter, Maddie, had been shopping in Angola on the afternoon of Jan. 9. After loading the back of their Dodge Durango with groceries, they headed to Auburn to pick up her daughter, Jackie, from a friend’s house.

Speidell’s SUV hit a patch of ice on C.R. 35 at C.R. 38, northwest of Auburn. He said another vehicle was in front of him, and he saw a natural gas line off the side of the road. In an effort to avoid striking either of them, he hit the accelerator and brake pedals at the same time. His vehicle spun 180 degrees and successfully avoided the other hazards, but the driver’s side struck a utility pole.

Deuter-Speidell cut her head, and Maddie bruised her knee. Deuter-Speidell was in the passenger seat of the vehicle, and from her perspective, her husband looked fine, but then she heard him making gurgling noises.

When she asked her husband if he was all right, he started “making weird breathing noises,” she said. Her daughter started to cry, as they both realized something was wrong.

Deuter-Speidell immediately called 911. She had worked as a 911 dispatcher in LaGrange County and at the Angola Police Department. Her first husband, Indiana State Police Trooper Dave Deuter, was killed by a semi on the Indiana Toll Road in July 1998 while making a traffic stop.

Not wanting lose another husband, she remained calm and put her dispatcher skills to work, informing the 911 dispatcher of their location and type of injuries. She also added she was Deuter’s wife.

The pole that Speidell’s Durango struck was partly inside their vehicle. Speidell was pinned for 50 minutes, as Auburn and Waterloo firefighters worked to extricate him using a Jaws of Life tool.

“When I saw the pole, don’t remember hitting it. The anesthesia of the Almighty was with me. I don’t remem-ber the pain,” Speidell said

The impact of the crash punctured Speidell’s lungs, broke his pelvis, ribs and clavicle and damaged his nerves. Emergency workers requested a helicopter so that he could be transported to Fort Wayne, but the foggy, snowy and icy conditions kept air traffic grounded.

“At moments, I could feel myself floating and people pulling me back down. I physically felt somebody pull my leg and pull me back down,” Speidell said. “I know of three times that I was floating away.”

He was transported to DeKalb Memorial Hospital in Auburn, where Dr. Jeffrey Justice treated him. Speidell’s lungs were so badly injured that they collapsed every time Justice put tubes in them. Speidell said he probably wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for the surgeon’s success and persistence.

“He hit my lungs in just the right spot,” Speidell said.

Later that night, Speidell was transferred to Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne. The next morning, on Jan. 10, doctors put him in a drug-induced coma because Speidell couldn’t breath. They inserted a trachea tube so that he wouldn’t strain his throat and so that his lungs had time to heal. While he was in the coma, surgeons operated on his pelvis. Speidell remained in a coma until Feb. 2.

When he woke up, his wife told him he had been in a terrible accident, and Speidell revealed he didn’t remember anything.

He stayed in the hospital until last week, and now he is starting physical and occupational therapy at Cameron Memorial Community Hospital.

“The chances of me making it weren’t all that great,” Speidell said.

Surviving the accident gives him a common bond with his sister, Robin Strine of Auburn, who was driving her car in Auburn on Feb. 16, 1990, when a large, ice-covered tree limb fell directly on her car and her head, splitting her skull from front to back. Years later, she began losing her eyesight as a result of the accident. Strine wrote a book, “Into the Darkness … Guided by His Light,” in hopes of encouraging those experiencing rough times.

Speidell also views his survival as a chance to encourage others, but also to put God first in his life. He said things were going well for him — he got married in November and retired from Foamex in Auburn just prior to tying the knot— and life was good. His wife always expressed concern that he put her above God, and she felt that wasn’t right.

Now, Speidell said, he has learned to truly love his Heavenly Father and feels he has the right kind of love for his wife, family and friends.

He also feels for those who have never had a moment of suffering that brought them closer to God.

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Indiana State Police Museum

Another of those ‘hidden gems’

INDIANAPOLIS---As schoolchildren file into the Indiana State Police museum on Indianapolis’ east side, three vehicles quickly capture their attention.

When the youngsters walk in the door, they see a 1937 Chevrolet State Police car. It looks just like those you see in movies about the 1930s — a sedan, black, yellow markings, ready to chase down John Dillinger and his gang.

Quickly, though, their attention is drawn to another state police car, or is it cars? Two fronts of modern police cruisers have been put back to back so that two groups of children can turn on the flashing lights and sirens and talk on the police radio at the same time!

The cars are wired so all the sound is inside the cars with the lights flashing on top. It’s clearly a big favorite in the museum.

This well-known state police car — or cars — with white and blue markings since has joined the history books, replaced by one with black body with yellow markings.

When that occurred 10 years ago, it was the first change in more than 30 years.

Against the west wall of the museum is the third major attraction. It’s a 1937 Indian police motorcycle with a 74-cubic inch engine. What makes it especially interesting is that its speed still is “classified.” When I visited there and asked about the speed, the attendant merely smiled and said, “As the sign says, it’s classified.”

These motorcycles were used by the Indiana State Police from 1937 to 1939 when the fleet was sold — at $10 per motorcycle!

It isn’t all speed and cars. When you enter the building, you see along the east wall photographs of the Indiana State Police troopers, including two civilian workers, who have been killed in the line of duty, 45 in all. The first trooper to be killed was Trooper Eugene Teague, who died Dec. 21, 1933, during the capture of members of the Dillinger gang.

The most recent was Trooper Daniel R. Barrett of the Peru District who died Jan. 27, 2008, when he was chasing a speeder and his car went off the road, striking a tree.

Of the 45, the first three killed — Teague, Trooper Paul Minneman (1937) and Trooper William Dixon (1938) — all died while attempting capture of notorious gangs of the day. Nearly half of the troopers who have been killed in the line of duty have died from gunshot wounds. The two civilian deaths — a lab technician and a motor carrier inspector — were both victims of highway accidents while carrying out their duties.

The Indiana State Police museum, officially called the Youth Education and Historical Center, is a modest one-story building next to Post 52 on East 21st Street, just off Interstate 70. You easily would be unaware it exists; this writer was only alerted by a small sign on Interstate 70 which simply says “State Police Museum” and an arrow. But the history of Indiana’s State Police is only part of what the museum program is about, which now is manned by a civilian staff. (I most recently talked with Michele Rader, administrative assistant. She said a trooper can be available upon request when school groups or similar organizations come to the museum.) Much of the museum’s instructional time is given to schoolchildren about safety, drugs and tornadoes. A large conference room and a smaller meeting room are used for these purposes plus activities of scout troops.

Other displays at the museum include firearms, photographs and police souvenirs from Indiana and other states.

Oh, yes, there’s also a small gift shop where you can buy, among other items, an Indiana State Police T-shirt. (I did.)

If You Go

GETTING THERE: South on I-69 to I-465 East. Continue on 465 east to I-70. Turn east on 70 and take the Post Road exit south to 21st Street. Turn west. The museum is through the first gate in the Indiana State Police fenced complex on the right side. Its address is 8500 E. 21st St.

INFORMATION: The museum is open Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is closed on all state holidays. For information or for tour arrangements call (317) 899-8293 or, toll-free, (888) 477-9688.

FEES: None.

March 13, 2009

Meeks to Receive Honorary Trine University Doctorate Degree

ANGOLA---Former Indiana State Senator Bob Meeks will be honored during the May 9th commencement ceremony at Trine University.

Officials announced today that Meeks will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters to recognize his long-term friendship and service to Trine, northeast Indiana and the entire state.

Meeks served in the State Senate for 20 years before retiring last year.

During that time, Meeks was involved in several tough negotiations on the state budget as the Appropriations Committee chair for the Senate.

Meeks was a public servant for 51 years which includes his time with the Indiana State Police.

Meeks has already been given the Sagamore of the Wabash Award by Governor Daniels.

March 12, 2009

Seymour Probationary Troopers Assigned Patrol Cars

Indianapolis---Wednesday, 45 probationary troopers from the 69th Indiana State Police Academy class were assigned patrol cars at the Indiana State Police Youth Education and Historical Center. Probationary troopers received approximately 840 hours of structured training in law enforcement techniques at the academy. Their curriculum includes: 80 hours of criminal law instruction, 50 hours of vehicle operations training, 30 hours of psychology and 40 hours of “Survival Spanish.” They also develop skills in criminal investigation, vehicle crash investigation and impaired driver prevention and detection.

Since their graduation on December 18, 2008, they have been working with veteran field training officers (FTOs) expanding their skills for solo patrol. FTOs are trained to supervise and evaluate the progress of a probationary trooper during their field training. FTOs are selected based upon their police related experience, skills, knowledge and abilities. All probationary troopers must complete one full year on probation before attaining permanent status as trooper. The Seymour Post received four of the 45 probationary troopers.

Trooper Neil Beiriger

Neil Beiriger is from Indianapolis, Indiana. He graduated from Cathedral High School, and latter attended Ball State and Purdue University majoring in Mechanical Engineering.

Trooper Korry Clark

Korry Clark is from Jonesville, Indiana. He attended Columbus East High School, and later attended North Dakota State University Bottineau where he majored in Urban Forestry.  He served as a Sgt. in the Indiana National Guard. 

Trooper Brian Earls

Brian Earls is from East Enterprise, Indiana. He graduated from Switzerland County High School and later attended IVY Tech, where he majored in Criminal Justice. He worked as a deputy for the Switzerland County Sheriff’s Department.

Trooper Clarence Glenn

Clarence Glenn is from Cincinnati, Ohio. He graduated from Princeton High School and later attended Franklin College, in Indiana, where he majored in Sociology and Criminal Justice.   

Anyone interested in a career with the Indiana State Police as a civilian or sworn police officer are encouraged to contact Sergeant Donald F. Gregory at 1-800-658-8328 or visit the Indiana State Police website at www.in.gov/isp.

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Peru Probationary Trooper Receives Patrol Car

Trooper A.J. Coffee

Peru---Yesterday, Probationary Trooper A.J. Coffee, who is assigned to the Indiana State Police Peru District, was issued his patrol car in a ceremony held at the Indiana State Police Indianapolis Post. Coffee is a member of the 69th Indiana State Police Recruit Academy which graduated December 18, 2008.  He recently completed approximately three months of field training with veteran officers. He is now on solo patrol in the district which covers Cass, Fulton, Miami, Howard, Tipton, and Wabash Counties.  

In addition to the three months of field training, Coffee, while assigned to the police academy received approximately 878 hours of structured training in law enforcement techniques. The curriculum included 85 hours of criminal law instruction, 80 hours of emergency vehicle operations training and 30 hours of psychology. Coffee also developed skills in criminal investigation, vehicle crash investigation, self-defense, firearms, and impaired driver detection and apprehension.

Coffee is a native of Blackford County, IN and 2004 graduate of Blackford County High School. Prior to joining the Indiana State Police, Coffee served a 12 month tour of duty in Iraq as an infantry soldier for the Indiana National Guard. Probationary Trooper Coffee followed his father, Indiana State Police Captain Charles Coffee, into a law enforcement career. Captain Coffee is a 29-year veteran of the Indiana State Police.

Probationary Trooper Coffee is assigned to patrol primarily in Tipton County.

Anyone interested in a career with the Indiana State Police is encouraged to contact Sergeant Tony Slocum at 1-800-382-0689 or visit the Indiana State Police website at www.in.gov/isp.

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Terre Haute Probationary Troopers Receive Cars to begin Solo Patrol

Darryl D. Cooley and James A. Cruse

Terre Haute---On Wednesday, March 11th, 45 probationary troopers from the 69th Indiana State Police Academy class were issued their state police cars at the Indiana State Police Youth Education and Historical Center located at the Indiana State Police Indianapolis District. Two of the officers, Darryl D. Cooley and James A. Cruse have been assigned to the Terre Haute Post and will be primarily patrolling in Clay County. The probationary officers recently completed a three month field training period with veteran officers. They will serve a one year probationary period before attaining permanent status as a trooper.

In addition to the three month field training period, the new troopers have received approximately 840 hours of structured training in law enforcement techniques.  Their curriculum included 80 hours of criminal law instruction, 50 hours of emergency vehicle operations training, 30 hours of psychology and 40 hours of “Survival Spanish”.  They also developed skills in criminal investigation, vehicle crash investigation and impaired driver prevention and detection.

Cooley is 29 years old and a Chicago, Illinois native having graduated from St. Rita High School. He is also a graduate of Indiana State University with a B. S. in Criminology. Cooley was previously employed two years with the Vigo County Sheriff’s Department as a correctional officer. He is married with four children and the family resides in Vigo County.

Cruse is 33 years old and a Terre Haute native having graduated from Terre Haute North High School and later Indiana State University with a B.S. in Criminology. He was previously employed in the private sector. He resides in Vigo County.

Anyone interested in a career with the Indiana State Police as a civilian or sworn police officer are encouraged to contact Sergeant Joe Watts at 1-800-742-0717 or visit the Indiana State Police website at  www.in.gov/isp.

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Pendleton Trooper Begins Solo Patrol

Trooper Jeremiah D. Criswell

Hamilton County---Lt. Clint Bundy, Commander of the Pendleton Post, announced that Probationary Trooper Jeremiah D. Criswell has successfully completed 14 weeks of intense field training.  Criswell received his Indiana State Police Patrol car today in ceremonies at the Indiana State Police Youth and Historical Center in Indianapolis.  Criswell will now patrol solo and has been assigned to Hamilton County.

Probationary Trooper Criswell is a 1999 graduate of Monrovia High School.  He served five years in the United States Navy.  During his tour of duty in the Navy he served on the USS John F. Kennedy and the USS Ticonderoga.  His tour of duty took him to the Arabian Gulf.  Criswell resides in Noblesville with his wife and son.

Anyone interested in a career with the Indiana State Police can call Sergeant Michael Burns at (800) 527-4752 or visit the Indiana State Police website at www.in.gov/isp.  

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Jasper Probationary Troopers Assigned Cars for Solo Patrol

Trooper Shane Staggs

Indianapolis---Today, 45 probationary troopers from the 69th Indiana State Police Academy class were issued their state police cars at the Indiana State Police Youth Education and Historical Center in Indianapolis.   

The probationary troopers graduated from the 69th Indiana State Police Academy on December 18, 2008.  Since their graduation the probationary troopers have worked with veteran field training officers (FTO).  The FTO’s where selected based upon their experience, skills, knowledge, and abilities.  The FTO’s are specially trained to supervise and evaluate the progress of a new trooper’s field training.   The new troopers will now begin a one year probationary period before attaining permanent status as a trooper.

Of the 45 probationary troopers one is assigned to the Jasper Post. Trooper Shane Staggs is a 2005 graduate of Paoli High School and attended Vincennes University where he graduated in 2007 with an Associate Degree in Law Enforcement.  Prior to becoming an Indiana State Trooper, Staggs worked as a police officer for the town of Paoli.  Staggs will now primarily patrol Orange County

Lieutenant Don Bolen Commander of the Jasper Post said, “Trooper Staggs has been a great addition to the Jasper Post.   With the training he has received so far with our department and his prior law enforcement experience I expect him to immediately make an impact in his assigned patrol area.”

Anyone interested in a career with the Indiana State Police as a civilian or sworn police officer are encouraged to contact Sergeant Chad D. Dick at 1-800-742-7475 or visit the Indiana State Police website at www.in.gov/isp.

March 11, 2009

Putnamville Probationary Trooper Receives Car to begin Solo Patrol

Trooper Probasco

Putnamville---Today, 45 probationary troopers from the 69th Indiana State Police Academy class were issued their state police cars at the Indiana State Police Youth Education and Historical Center located at the Indiana State Police Indianapolis District. One officer, Scott T. Probasco, has been assigned to the Putnamville Post and will be primarily patrolling in Hendricks County. The probationary officers recently completed a three month field training period with veteran officers. They will serve a one year probationary period before attaining permanent status as a trooper.

In addition to the three month field training period, the new troopers have received approximately 840 hours of structured training in law enforcement techniques.  Their curriculum included 80 hours of criminal law instruction, 50 hours of emergency vehicle operations training, 30 hours of psychology and 40 hours of “Survival Spanish”.  They also developed skills in criminal investigation, vehicle crash investigation and impaired driver prevention and detection.

Probasco is a 2001 graduate of Benton Central High School and attended Indiana/ Purdue University

Fort Wayne, where he majored in history. He enlisted with the United States Army Reserves in 2006 and serves as a Military Police Officer.  He and his wife reside in Brownsburg with their two daughters.

Anyone interested in a career with the Indiana State Police as a civilian or sworn police officer are encouraged to contact Sergeant Richard W. Myers at 1-800-225-8576 or visit the Indiana State Police Website at www.in.gov/isp.

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Three New Connersville Troopers Begin Patrol

Connersville---Three new Troopers will begin patrolling the roads here in the Connersville District after successfully completing 15 weeks of Field Training.  Probationary Troopers Eric Fields, Brandon Steffee and Andrew Wandersee received their cars today in Indianapolis.

The new troopers received approximately 878 hours of structured training in law enforcement techniques. Their class started on June 15, 2008 with their curriculum including 85 hours of criminal law instruction,

80 hours of vehicle operations training, and 30 hours of psychology.  They also developed skills in criminal investigation, vehicle crash investigation and impaired driver prevention and detection.  

Probationary Trooper Eric Fields graduated from Union City High School in 1999.  He went on to graduate from Ivy Tech in 2001 with an Associates Degree in Business Administration and was a Wayne County Deputy from 2002 to 2008.  He resides in Wayne County with his wife and two children and will be assigned to Wayne County.

Probationary Trooper Brandon Steffee graduated from Centerville High School in 2005.  He attended college at Mount Vernon before being hired by the Capitol Police in 2007.  He resides in Wayne County and will be assigned to Henry County.

Probationary Trooper Andrew Wandersee graduated from Centerville High School in 1997.  He was a Centerville Police Officer from 2002 to 2008.  Wandersee resides in Wayne County with his wife and child and will be assigned to Wayne County.

First Sergeant Todd Fields, Assistant Commander of the Connersville Post, said “Because these officers all had prior law enforcement experience I expect them to immediately make an impact in their assigned patrol area.  We welcome them to District 41 and wish them a safe and lengthy ISP career.”

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Probationary Troopers Assigned Cars for Solo Patrol

Indianapolis---Today, 45 probationary troopers from the 69th Indiana State Police Academy class were issued their state police cars at the Indiana State Police Youth Education and Historical Center located at the Indiana State Police Indianapolis District.  Seven of the officers are assigned to the Indianapolis State Police Post and will start solo patrol in the district which covers Marion, Boone, Johnson and Shelby Counties. The probationary officers recently completed a three month field training period with veteran officers. They will serve a one year probationary period before attaining permanent status as a trooper.

In addition to the three month field training period, the new troopers have received approximately 840 hours of structured training in law enforcement techniques.  Their curriculum included 80 hours of criminal law instruction, 50 hours of emergency vehicle operations training, 30 hours of psychology and 40 hours of “Survival Spanish”.  They also developed skills in criminal investigation, vehicle crash investigation and impaired driver prevention and detection.

Anyone interested in a career with the Indiana State Police as a civilian or sworn police officer are encouraged to contact Sergeant Anthony Emery at 1-800-582-8440 or visit the Indiana State Police Website at www.in.gov/isp.

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Peru State Police Employees Donate Food to Those in Need

LogansportYesterday, Indiana State Police Master Trooper Randy Pryor delivered over 150 non-perishable food items to the Emmaus Mission Benevolence Center Food Pantry at 1203 College Street, Logansport, IN. The items were donated by employees of the Indiana State Police Peru Post. The food was collected as part of First Lady Cheri Daniels “Hoosiers Helping Hoosiers” food drive held during February.

The Emmaus Mission Center is a non profit, multi-denominational social service agency that provides support for marginalized families and individuals within a 50 mile radius of Cass County. The mission’s clientele typically includes elderly people that are attempting to survive on the bare minimum, single parents that have become unable to provide for their children, and those that have become homeless for various reasons. Most are the "working poor" on the brink of financial and familial disaster.

“The fundamental function of police work is helping people in their time of need,” stated Master Trooper Pryor. “If you do not have food, it makes it hard to do other things required to get back on your feet. We appreciate the Emmaus Mission for allowing us to play a small role in helping Hoosiers during their time of need.”

According to Gary Gore, an employee of the Emmaus Mission, staff members and volunteers feed approximately 3,000 people a month. This is up from approximately 2,500 people fed per month in 2008. Elaine Sikes, also an employee of the mission, said Emmaus is always looking for donations of food, clothing, bedding, and cash. Sikes said the food pantry desperately needs meat items to distribute with other food.

For more information about the Emmaus Mission Center call 574-753-3500.

March 09, 2009

ISP Sgt. David and Jan Lloyd's daughter, Tiffany,

has been in Iraq for the past 7 months

My Precious Family and Friends,

It’s with great enthusiasm and excitement that I can say NEXT WEEK I will be back in the States!  We are in our final days out here in the beautiful, barren desert of Al Taqaddum!  Everyone is ready to go home and eagerly anticipating the day we step onto the plane leaving TQ, then Kuwait, then US soil.  We are all living in temporary billeting areas right now, which means shared space, tight quarters, living out of bags, and trying not to disturb your neighbor when they’re sleeping.  We’re all a bit on edge, as these temporary conditions test everyone’s patience.  However, we are going HOME, so no one is complaining too much. 

My Marines are doing very well and I could not be more proud of the platoon as a whole.  We have done our very best to fulfill the responsibilities of our mission to provide reliable and redundant communications capabilities, often going above and beyond what was required.  We are leaving the communications infrastructure with many improvements, following a lesson my parents taught me, “You always leave a place in better condition than how you found it.”  As we step away from TQ next week, I will honestly be able to look back and say we left the communications network much better than we found it.  Of course, the credit goes to my Marines, who have been continually motivated and committed to our mission.  Sometimes the motivation was hard to find, but each task was always completed.  This is where the core value of “commitment” came into play.  Solid Marines are committed to completing the task at hand even when they’re tired, hungry, and spent.  Mission accomplishment comes first. 

One week ago our battalion experienced its first, and hopefully only, fallen Marine in the deployment.  He was the “A” driver for an LVS (a large vehicle with a flatbed) ground guiding it for re-fueling here on base.  They had just returned from a convoy.  The Marine who was ground guiding his buddy who was driving the LVS tripped and fell.  The vehicle ran over him.  I have one question for God, “Why?”  I don’t believe God made it happen, but for an entire deployment to be casualty free, then in the last weeks a Marine getting run over completing a re-fueling mission he’s done numerous times…it doesn’t make sense.  We will never understand the “why”, but have no choice but to accept what happened.  There was a beautiful memorial service on Sunday celebrating Corporal Donte Whitworth’s life.  His legacy has forever impacted the lives of his fellow Marines and Sailors.  The funeral will be held in Noblesville, IN on March 13.

Right now we’re in the midst of “turning over” with our replacements from 2nd Supply Battalion stationed who are in Camp LeJune, NC.  We’re showing them what our day-to-day job is like and educating them on everything communication-wise out here that we can.  The official turnover will be completed later this week; then we’ll be waiting for our flight window to “open up” later next week. 

Thank you for your thoughts, prayers, E-mails, and packages throughout the last 7 months.  Myself and my Marines have felt loved and cared about.  Knowing that we have the support of fellow Americans, amidst everything we hear about on the news, keeps us in the fight every day.

When I get home I’m looking forward to walking on the beach in flip-flops with my latte from Starbucks in hand!  I’m taking a trip to a Spa in order to get the Iraqi dirt out of my skin, and also getting a pedicure first thing.  I’m looking forward to some sushi, guacamole, and any home-cooking I can get!  It will also be wonderful to have the comforts of home right there in my little condo again!  We have so much to be thankful for every day!  Of course, I’m anxiously looking forward to seeing many of you very soon too!

Serving God and Our Country,

Tiffany

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The Foot Pursuit 5k

Pictured from right to left (standing) Troopers Les Norvell, Mike Bailey, Seth Rainey, Major Jerome Ezell

(Kneeling) right to left Troopers J. Myers, Fred Blohm, Stephanie Jones ( wife of Trooper Mike Jones and Lesly Bailey (wife of Mike Bailey)

They ran a 3.1 mile race on March 7th it was called The Foot Pursuit 5k.  It was put on by the Porter County Sheriff Department and Fraternal Order of Police to benefit the Porter County Chapter of the American Red Cross and the Timothy Hecht Scholarship (he was a Porter County Sheriff Deputy who died in the line of duty in Feb 1999).

March 06, 2009

Upcoming Clemency Hearing / Petition Attached

 
NAPPANEE POLICE OFFICER BRANT "BUTCH" NINE was killed in the line of duty by gunfire on November 3, 1988. The offender, michael steele has filed for clemency.
 
The Public Hearing will be held April 2, 2009 at the Indy Government Center, SOUTH, 302 W. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN -  Conference Room #4 at 11:00 am.  The clemency hearing will be April 24, 2009 at approximately 10:00 a.m. (the time is subject to change/if so I will send notification via email).

The attached petition(s) can be brought with you on April 2, if you plan to attend the PUBLIC HEARING. Otherwise, please mail them to the Indiana Parole Board, Room E321, 302 W. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN 46204. The petitions must be sent before the clemency hearing on April 24, 2009 to allow the Parole Board the opportunity to review the documents before the hearing.  Letters are also allowed by following these same instructions.
 
NOTE: You must enter the Indy Govt. Center South from the 302 W. Washington St location as this is the security entrance and the ONLY entrance now allowed.
 
At the request of the Indiana Parole Board, anyone who plans to attend the Public Hearing please conctact me via email or by cell at 765-318-2466 BEFORE April 2, 2009.
 
Thank you for your support. Please let me know if you have any questions contact Janice Marie Starnes

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Karen Shelton provides an update on the Deb Deuter Speidell family

Deb called to report that her husband, Randy is being released from the hospital today!  They were very excited that he is being released a week earlier than planned.  He will be in therapy at Cameron Rehab Center here in Angola for some time on an out-patient basis.

His rehab will last for several months, so if you would like to send a card of encouragement to Deb, Randy and the girls, their home address is:  375 Ln 100 Pine Canyon Lake, Angola, IN  46703.

Deb is very grateful to all her police family for keeping them in their prayers over the last two months and for all the nice cards, visits and gifts that have been sent their way.

March 05, 2009

Indiana State Police Seymour Post

Pull Together Food for Hoosiers in Need

SeymourState Employees from the Seymour Post joined First Lady, Cheri Daniels’, “Hoosiers Helping Hoosiers in Need”- a state-wide food drive. Troopers and civilians from the Seymour Post pulled together non-perishable food items and money, during the month of February, in an effort to help area food pantries care for hosiers’ in need. The 268 food items and $100 in cash donated by employees at the Post, was evenly divided among three area centers, one from each county the Seymour Post serves: Bartholomew, Jackson and Jennings.

Trooper Matt Simmons making presentation to Elizabeth Kestler

Elizabeth Kestler, Executive Director of the Love Chapel Center in Bartholomew County, was presented a check in front of the center by Trooper Matt Simmons. While taking the food into the pantry, Ms. Kestler stated that 40% of the services provided to the community were in the form of financial assistance. She also said volunteers, as well as food items, were needed to help those in need. Mrs. Kestler may be reached at 812-372-9421 or lovechapeldirector@colmbuslovechapel.com.

Trooper Eric Meyer making pesentation to Del Kloeker

Del Kloeker, Board Member of Community Provisions of Jackson County, was presented with a check in front of their center by Trooper Eric Meyer. Mr. Kloeker said that one of their biggest needs is meat. Volunteers are always appreciated too; they receive the food items and box them up for distribution. He stated area farmers and hunters have been helping out by providing deer meat during hunting season. Community Provisions Director, Paul Brock, may be reached at 522-7079.

Trooper Derrek Simpson making presentation to Kitty Shepherd

Kitty Shepherd, Jennings County Coordinating Council Director was presented a check in front of their center by Trooper Derrek Simpson. Ms. Shepherd stated that part of their goal is to provide, families and individuals, emergency financial help with food, clothing, fuel and light bills, as well as rent payments. She stated that money is never given directly to families, but paid to grocery stores, utility companies and drug stores instead. Some of the canned food items needed on a regular basis are pinto beans, tuna, salmon, sloppy joe sauce, tomato juice and northern beans. Mrs. Shepherd may be reached at 812-346-5183.

Lieutenant Mark R. Davis stated, “Many families right here in our community are having a difficult time and need help. Our employees will continue to support families in need through these wonderful agencies and local churches in our district.”

The Indiana State Police occasionally receives visits from Hoosiers requesting assistance in paying utility bills or asking for money to buy food. These requests are referred to area food pantries, shelters and other organizations, communities have set up to render assistance.

March 01, 2009

Radio icon Paul Harvey dies at 90

Paul Harvey was a lifetime member of the Indiana Troopers Association.

His membership plaque hangs on his Chicago office wall today.

PHOENIX---Radio icon and Phoenix resident Paul Harvey, who delivered the news of the day to millions of listeners with a staccato style and homespun air, died in Phoenix on Saturday with family members by his side. He was 90.

Harvey, who lived in a lavish home near the Arizona Biltmore, came to adore the state. Over the years, he split his time between Phoenix and a home in Chicago.

His signature spots like "And now the rest of the story" and "Page 2" became part of radio's popular culture. He became a heartland icon, delivering news and commentary with a distinctive Midwestern flavor. "Stand by for news!" he told his listeners. He was credited with inventing or popularizing terms such as "skyjacker," "Reaganomics" and "guesstimate."

Some came to calling him "America's most beloved huckster," with his ability to move between news to pitching products, from dietary supplements to vacuums to adjustable beds. But he did it in such an easygoing style that few took offense.

"He is a legend, the likes of which we won't see again," said Mary Morrison, president of the House of Broadcast Inc., a Scottsdale museum that showcases those who impacted Arizona. "Just like Walter Cronkite, people trusted him. I guess he was the most trusted man on radio."

Harvey got his start at a Tulsa, Okla., radio station in 1933, and was heard nationally since 1951, when he began his "News and Comment" for ABC Radio Networks.

"He's one of a dying breed," agreed William Shover, former director of public affairs for Phoenix Newspapers Inc.

Shover spent time with Harvey and enjoyed his vibrant personality, on and off the air. "He just loved to sit and talk. He'd be sitting in the lobby of the Biltmore, and he'd be telling stories about his career. He worked so hard and wrote so many of his own scripts," Shover said.

Harvey "was just a fine guy," Shover said. "And he loved his wife, dearly. He talked about her all the time."

Lynne "Angel" Harvey died of leukemia May 3 at the couple's home in the Chicago suburb of River Forest. The two had been married since 1940.

In an interview with The Republic in April 2001, Harvey spoke about signing a $100 million, 10-year contract with ABC Radio, even though he would be 92 years old when the contract ended. Two other radio networks said they'd be in line when his contract was up. "If I still feel like 55, I'll consider other offers," Harvey said.

For years, he kept an admirable regimen - getting up at 3 a.m. and walking from his upstairs bedroom to the small broadcast studio down the hall in his home. He was known to deliver the news in his pajamas.

Being such a regular guy attracted listeners like Page resident Bob Wombacher, who said in 1999 that he never gets sentimental over most stars. "I have never shed tears over the death of a celebrity but will have to make an exception on the day that we lose Paul Harvey," he said.

On Saturday, Wombacher said he was saddened by the death. Hearing Harvey's voice had been like listening to a friend. Harvey had been forced off the air for several months in 2001 because of a virus that weakened a vocal cord. He returned to work in Chicago and was still active as he passed his 90th birthday.

"Paul Harvey was one of the most gifted and beloved broadcasters in our nation's history," ABC Radio Networks President Jim Robinson said in a statement. "We will miss our dear friend tremendously and are grateful for the many years we were so fortunate to have known him."

Son Paul Harvey Jr. wrote: "My father and mother created from thin air what one day became radio and television news. So in the past year, an industry has lost its godparents and today millions have lost a friend."

In 2005, Harvey was one of 14 notables chosen as recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He also was an inductee in the Radio Hall of Fame, as was his wife.

He composed his twice-daily news commentaries from a downtown Chicago office near Lake Michigan.

At the peak of his career, Harvey reached more than 24 million listeners on more than 1,200 radio stations and charged $30,000 to give a speech. His fans identified with his plainspoken political commentary, but critics called him an out-of-touch conservative. Perhaps Harvey's most famous broadcast came in 1970, when he announced his opposition to President Richard Nixon's expansion of the war, urging him to get out completely.

"Mr. President, I love you ... but you're wrong," Harvey said, shocking his faithful listeners.

Harvey was born Paul Harvey Aurandt in Tulsa on Sept. 4, 1918.

His father, a police officer, was killed when he was a toddler.

A high-school teacher took note of his distinctive voice and launched him on a broadcast career.

February 28, 2009

Three Indiana Guardsmen return safely to the Indiana State Police

VERSAILLES---Three Indiana Guardsmen are already back home and ready to return to work at the Indiana State Police district in Versailles.

Trooper Ricky Love is back on patrol in Decatur County after returning in mid-February from a tour in Iraq with a cavalry troop that provided convoy security.

Corporal Robert Garcia just got back from serving in a military police company that helped train Iraqi officers.

And Master Trooper Glen Potts will return to detective work after retiring as a Lt. Colonel with 34-years total service.

February 27, 2009

Sgt. Robert A Hedger PE4419 hospitalized

Cindy Hedger called me today to let me know Bob had a doctor’s appointment for his knee. 

He had an infection that worked its way to his knee and it is getting worse. 

He is being admitted to the hospital to treat him with antibiotics. 

He will be in the hospital the rest of this week and then home on IV for at least 6 weeks. 

Worst case is they might have to remove the knee and flush the infected area and then replace the knee.  

They are not sure which hospital they will be in yet as St. Francis is full. 

I will let you know when I hear more and at this time they don’t want visitors until they get settled.  Keep Bob in your prayers. 

February 23, 2009

Community Paves Way for Canine Partner

The photo shows Bremen Lt. Brad Weaver congratulating Tpr. McNamara

at the K-9 graduation with Zane.

Kosciusko County - Indiana State Police Trooper Ryan McNamara recently finished an extensive 17-week training course in Fort Wayne with his new K-9 partner Zane.  McNamara and Zane will join their multi-trained counterparts (dogs and handlers) who work in the field throughout the state.  Tpr. McNamara, who is assigned to the Bremen District, will cover Kosciusko, Marshall, St. Joseph, and Elkhart Counties

The course training was conducted under the supervision of Master Trainer Bob Compton, who has headed up canine training for the Allen County Sheriff’s Department for the last 30 years.  Compton has trained over 1,000 dogs for law enforcement.  Trooper McNamara spent in excess of 500 hours training and preparing his new partner for the challenges that await them.  McNamara trained Zane in obedience, agility, tracking, evidence searches, building and area searches, aggression control, and narcotics detection.  McNamara also received training on K-9 first aid, legal training, and developed daily workout programs that will ensure Zane will remain in top physical condition.

The State Police K-9 program has proven to be a tremendous service to Indiana citizens and law enforcement.  This program is only made possible from the generosity of the communities that we serve, commented Tpr. McNamara.  I remain very thankful to the Kosciusko County Prosecutors Office, Wal-Mart, Silveus Insurance Group and dozens of businesses and individuals that donated the money that made this a reality.  The State Police K-9 program is funded entirely from public and private donations.

Trooper McNamara can be reached for an interview and demonstration by contacting the Bremen District at 574-546-4900.

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Off-duty Indiana state trooper Greg Ashby assaulted

DUBOIS---Two Dubois County, Ind., residents were arrested Sunday night after allegedly assaulting an off-duty state police officer in their front yard.

Indiana State Police spokesman Sgt. Todd Ringle said Robert D. Jones, 39, and Tamara Batiz, 43, were both intoxicated when Sgt. Greg Ashby saw Jones' pickup truck sideways and blocking both lanes of Indiana 56 near Cazco Road in Dubois County.

In a news release about the incident, Ringle said Ashby got out of his car and found Jones behind the wheel, "extremely intoxicated" and "attempting to pull into his driveway." Jones ignored the officer's order to get out of the truck and instead steered the truck into his driveway.

Ashby followed and, as he tried to handcuff Jones, was attacked from behind by Batiz, who jumped on the officer's back.

Ringle said Ashby was able to handcuff Jones, then chased Batiz as she tried to go into the house. As the officer tried to handcuff Batiz, Jones — still in handcuffs — ran toward the state trooper and knocked him to the ground.

Police officers from French Lick, West Baden, Orange County and the Indiana State Police arrived soon thereafter and arrested both Batiz and Jones. They were taken to the Dubois County Jail.

Ashby received only minor injuries, Ringle said.

Jones will face charges of resisting law enforcement, battery on a police officer, driving while intoxicated and failure to identify. Batiz was charged with resisting law enforcement, battery on a police officer and public intoxication.

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Elston update

Trp Cliff Elston, PE 8105, District 42, was involved in commission 10-50 pi on Saturday, February 21st.     He was enroute to the interstate due slide offs and accidents.  While enroute to the interstate, he lost control of his vehicle and then was broadsided by another vehicle that struck him on the passenger side of the commission.  He suffered from 2 broken ribs, a broken leg and a cut on the back of his head requiring staples.

On Sunday, February 22nd, we received an email from Versailles advising that he had received surgery on his leg, placing a titanium rod in his leg and the surgeons were pleased with the surgery.  He’s in good spirits although in pain from his ribs rather than his leg. 

On Monday, February 23, 2009, at 0735 hrs Versailles dispatch advised he should be released from the hospital either today or tomorrow. 

Cliff’s address is:           2834 E 900 S Cross Plains, IN  47017

February 22, 2009

Indiana state trooper Clifton Elston injured in accident

VERSAILLES---Trooper Clifton Elston An Indiana State Trooper was among those injured in a crash Saturday afternoon in Ripley County. \Indiana State Police say the crash happened around 4:35pm on US 421 about a mile south of Versailles.

Trooper Clifton Elston, 31 of Cross Plains was northbound on U.S. 421 when he lost control of his 2006 Ford Crown Victoria police vehicle and skidded left of center and was struck broadside in the passenger side by a southbound 1994 Ford Thunderbird driven by Lance Provost, 37 of Louisville, Kentucky. 

The impact sent the Thunderbird into the ditch on the west side of the roadway.

Tpr. Elston suffered multiple leg fractures and fractured ribs. 

He was flown to Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis where he is listed in stable condition.  The injuries, though serious, do not appear to be life threatening.

The driver and passengers of the Ford Thunderbird were transported by ambulance to Kings Daughters Hospital in Madison. 

Provost, 37 suffered a severe laceration to his left hand. Krystel Kemper, 26, a front seat passenger suffered bruising to her right hand and foot.

Lana Provost, 13 had bruising to her legs and arms. Another rear passenger, Courtney Gootee, 14, suffered a head laceration and possible broken ankle.

Two Indiana State Police crash reconstructionists were on scene investigating the crash. ISP hasn't determined the cause of the crash. Preliminary indications are the cause of the crash could be weather related as the roadway was snow and ice covered from earlier snowfall.

February 20, 2009

Indiana State Police Honors Those Who Gave All

The month of May is designated as National Police Officers Month.  Each year the Indiana State Police honor the officers who have given their lives in the line of duty in our state.   Post memorials are open to the public and are usually followed by a luncheon.   ISP retirees and family membersare especially encouraged to attend the memorial programs.  During the service, the names of the fallen officers are read, followed by briefremarks of their final ISP detail.   Please join the ISP this year in honoring those who served with pride.

February 17, 2009

Photos of the New Bloomington Post

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ISP Dispatchers Support "Special Olympics"

ISP Dispatchers, Troopers, as well as law enforcement officers from across the state have joined in an effort to support the "Cop On A Roof Top" project to raise funds for the Special Olympics Program.

On May 1st, there will be approximately twenty Dunkin Donuts that will participate by having a "Cop On Roof Top" Promotion.   Volunteers are needed for all locations.

Currently, there will be participating locations in the following cities:  Anderson, Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, Kokomo, Greenfield, Avon, Carmel,  and Greenwood.  Other cities will be added as the date approaches. 

Volunteers are needed from City/County/State law enforcement agencies, as well as from the DNR and Department of Corrections.  

Other events coming up to raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics include the Torch Run on June 5th, Motorcycle Ride on Sept. 19th, as well as the Plane Pull and Showdown of the Shields.

A Raffle is underway with the Grand Prize a 2009 Harley Davidson; 1st prize-$1,000 Home Depot Gift Card; additional prizes include a $500 Pacer Package, Apple IPhone and Sears gift card.  Tickets are $10 each and the drawing is Sept. 19th.

From all these events, Special Olympics supports almost 10,000 athletes in the State of Indiana.

For more information, contact T/S IV Donna Decker, SP IDACS at dqdecker@aol.com

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Indiana state police warn about scam

JASPER---Indiana State Police detectives at the Jasper Post report investigating a new scam that has caused several people to lose money.

Preliminary investigation shows the victims have received a phone call from a person pretending to be their grandson. The caller had enough information that the victims truly believed it to be their grandson. The caller stated he’d gotten in trouble in Canada and needed money to get out of jail and back to the United States. The caller then would tell the victims not to tell his mom and dad so he wouldn’t get in more trouble and that he would pay them back after he bonded out. The victims, believing the caller was their grandson, went to the bank, withdrew the funds and wired the money. Later, the victims discovered that the caller wasn’t their grandson and that they had been conned.

Further investigation indicates the scam caller is in Canada, where he claims the wire transfer with fake identity. First Sgt. Rob Priest said this scam has happened a number of times in the last few months in the Jasper District. Priest said, “A lot of personal information is obtained off the Internet from popular genealogy Web sites social networking sites. It is not uncommon for personal and family information to be available to the general public on these type of sites; therefore scammers have the information too.”

Det. Rick Bonesteel, from the Lowell Post, also has recently investigated similar scams in northwest Indiana. Det. Bonesteel said, “Authorities in Canada stated they have had more than 50 complaints of this same type of scam. It appears that the caller targets elderly victims claiming to be a family member (in particular a grandchild) in desperate need to have money wired to them in Canada.”

Police suggest the following precautions before someone wires money to another person:

Be absolutely sure you know who you are sending the money to before you send it.

Call before you send money, get a return telephone number.

Keep the transaction information, such as reference numbers, confidential.

Don’t be rushed into wiring the money.

Anyone with any information regarding this scam should call Indiana State Police Det. First Sgt. Rob Priest of the Jasper Post at (812) 482-1441 or (800) 752-7475.

February 13, 2009

PICKUP TRUCK COLLIDES WITH AMISH BUGGY

SENDS THREE TO HOSPITAL AND ONE TO JAIL

LaGrange County---US 20 was closed for approximately two hours this morning when an Amish buggy was struck by a pickup truck sending its three occupants to the hospital and the driver of the pickup truck to the LaGrange County Jail. 

Preliminary investigation by Master Trooper Jim Sheffield indicated that at approximately 11:00 am, an Amish buggy operated by Joseph L. Schwartz, 26, of Middlebury, Indiana, was traveling eastbound on US 20 just east of County Road 1000 W.  The buggy was rear-ended by a 1998 Ford pickup truck driven by Gerald Hochstetler, 40, of Shipshewana, Indiana.  As a result of the crash, Schwartz suffered injuries to his head and face and his two children, Eli, 3, and Amy, 1, suffered facial abrasions.  All three were taken to a local hospital where they were expected to be treated and released.  The horse that was pulling the buggy died at the crash scene.

Hochstetler was arrested at the scene and incarcerated in the LaGrange County Jail on charges of: 

Assisting Sheffield at the scene were Indiana State Police Master Trooper Doug Kelly, Senior Trooper Steve Malone, Motor Carrier Inspectors Dee Davis and Joe Robinson, Shipshewana Fire Department, LaGrange County Sheriff Department and LaGrange County EMS.

February 12, 2009

Indiana state trooper Ron Whitney injured in accident

The photos show the before and after appearance of Whitneys mustang.

Wednesday 020409 at approximately 12:27 p.m., officers from the Indiana State Police, Miami County Sheriff's Office, and Peru Police Department responded to a two-vehicle crash on Business 31 near Moys Lane, which injured Indiana State Police trooper Ron Whitney.

Whitney was given an MRI which revealed some fractures to his pelvis.  He is expected to be off work for 4-6 weeks. 

February 11, 2009

ISP trooper uninjured after South Bend crash

Sgt. Maurice Wilkins

SOUTH BEND---An Indiana State Police trooper was uninjured after an accident early Wednesday in South Bend.

The crash happened about 12:45 a.m. in the 1100 block of South Main Street, near the intersection with Garst Street, city 911 dispatch said.

The Indiana State Police in Bremen said Sgt. Maurice Wilkins had a car stopped on South Main when a third vehicle, driven by Lorenzo Garcia-Perales, of South Bend, struck the patrol car from behind.

The patrol car had minor damage, an ISP spokesman said, and no one was injured.

Garcia-Perales was arrested on suspicion of operating while intoxicated after a field sobriety test, authorities said.

February 10, 2009

Indiana State Police Dismantled 1.059 Meth Labs in 2008

Methamphetamine (crank or speed as it is often called on the street) is an illegal and highly addictive central nervous system stimulant which can cause heart attacks, strokes, brain damage, and even death. Its users become physically and psychologically dependent on the drug.  A person under the influence of meth can become paranoid, delusional, and aggressive. This makes the user and the drug a danger to all communities.

Methamphetamine is usually made from crude clandestine laboratories (meth labs) found frequently in motel rooms, vehicles, woods, farm outbuildings, and homes in rural and urban communities. Methamphetamine is made using products found for sale at hardware stores, home supply stores, drug stores, and general discount stores. During the cooking process, these labs release toxic and explosive vapors into the air. Items left over after the cooking process, commonly called meth trash, is usually dumped along road sides, fields, woods, or in the trash cans of unsuspecting home owners. Meth trash is extremely toxic and volatile. The making of methamphetamine and dumping of its trash continues to be a hazard in all 92 of Indiana’s counties.

During 2008, the Indiana State Police Clandestine Lab Team dismantled 1,059 meth labs, compared to 820 in 2007. In 2006, there were 766 labs dismantled.

 Labs Dismantled by ISP in the Peru District                     2008 Meth Suppression Section Statistics                                                         

                                       (2006)   (2007)      (2008)                          

 Cass County                    11          10              9                       1,064 new cases 

 Fulton County                  7            6               2                       1,336 retail visits

 Howard County              20           21             30                      816 tips generated retailers/general public

 Miami County                20           28             51                      273 Meth Awareness programs conducted

 Tipton County                 1              1              1                       Over 14,408 people attended the programs

 Wabash County               6             5      ­­­­­­­­­­____5__                   836 people arrested on 2,418 charges

 Totals                              65           71             98

“Methamphetamine production is a community problem,” stated First Sergeant Bob Land, a member of the Indiana State Police Clandestine Lab Enforcement Team. “The public is instrumental in locating many of the methamphetamine labs. We encourage citizens to report suspected methamphetamine activity by calling their local law enforcement or the anonymous Indiana State Police Methamphetamine Tip Line at 1-800-453-4756.  We need your information not your name.”

Anyone who would like an educational presentation on what items criminals use to make methamphetamine should contact First Sergeant Bob Land at the Indiana State Police Peru Post by calling 1-800-382-0689.

February 09, 2009

The new Supt. of Public Instruction, Dr. Tony Bennett has

included our essay contest information on his weekly newsletter

that goes to all Indiana School Superintendents.

You get to it by: 2009 David Deuter Memorial 5th Grade Essay Contest

the essay topic is "What Being A Good citizen Means To Me" The program is named to honor the memory of Master Trooper David A. Deuter, who was killed in the line of duty on the toll road on July 16, 1998.

The invitations and guidelines/entry form should have reached the schools this week....so it is great timing.

****************************************

Update of Deb & husband Randy

I talked to Deb around 3pm today;  Randy continues to improve and she was allowed to stay in his ICU area almost all the time she was there today.   They are using a marker board to communicate.  Tomorrow they are scheduling a "swallow test" to make sure that the foods they are giving him are going through the right channels.   She says he is more alert and hopefully soon can be moved to a regular room and eventually to a rehab closer to Angola.  Keep praying, Deb sounded really tired today.

Karen Shelton
Director of Operations
Indiana Troopers Association
karen@trooper.org
1-800-671-9851

February 04, 2009

Indiana state trooper recovering from injuries after wreck

JEFFERSONVILLE---An Indiana State Police officer is still recovering from a crash that took place along New Chapel Road just north of Lentzier Trail in Jeffersonville at 1:45 p.m. Sunday.

Sgt. Myron L. Wilkerson, of Jeffersonville, is receiving treatment for injuries that are not believed to be life-threatening, Sgt. Jerry Goodin said.

William D. Cundiff, 26, of Jeffersonville, was driving a gold 1999 Chevrolet Monte Carlo southbound and drifted 11 inches left of center when he struck an unmarked police car driven by Wilkerson, according to an accident report.

The width of the roadway had been made smaller due to ice and snow on each side, the report states.

Cundiff reportedly told officers he was receiving a cell phone call and looked down to see who was calling. Goodin said Cundiff was cited for driving left of center when not permitted and for an insurance violation.

Wilkerson’s most severe injury was listed as complaint of pain, and he later went to the hospital. Cundiff had no injuries listed in the report.

Goodin said a witness corroborated that Cundiff drove left of center. The total estimate of the damage for both vehicles was between $10,000 and $25,000.

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Indiana State Police 69th Recruit Academy December 2008

February 03, 2009

Let's Cheer Up ISP's Oldest Retiree - Dave Milbourn

The ITA has learned that Retired ISP Detective Dave Milbourn is in the hospital.   Milbourn, who is 95 and the oldest living Indiana State Police officer, is being treated for some type of viral infection and visits are not recommended.   However, cards of encouragement may be sent to his home:   2307 Sheridan Drive, Goshen, IN  46526. Please keep Dave and JoAnn in your prayers.

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Fan attacks ref who also is an Indiana state trooper

MICHIGAN CITY---An angry fan who attacked a referee following a basketball game Friday didn't realize until too late that he was attacking an Indiana State trooper.

Sixty-four-year-old Patrick Rempala, of Michigan City, was taken to the Porter County Jail on charges of battery and resisting. The arrest came after the boys basketball game between host Washington Township High School and Michigan City Marquette.

Glen Fifield, the referee who was attacked, told police that Rempala rushed out of the stands after the game and confronted the referees, screaming "you suck."

And after Rempala pointed at his chest and bumped Fifield, a school official stepped in, Fifield said.

After he was pushed, Fifield identified himself as a police officer and told Rempala that he was under arrest.

Rempala responded, "You can't arrest me, you're a referee," and he pushed the state trooper again.

After a struggle, and with assistance from spectators, Fifield gained control of Rempala and arrested him.

Fifield said he's been confronted by fans before, but this is the first time he's been attacked in his six years as a referee.

"It's just a shame it had to happen where kids could see," Fifield said

February 02, 2009

updated info on

 SOUP & DESSERT LUNCH FUNDRAISER

TO BENEFIT AUBREY ANDERSON

The benefit "Soup & Dessert Lunch" held last Friday for Trooper Caleb Anderson's

daughter raised $918 and the ITRCC will match it....

they have additional benefits planned for the future.

******************************

Update of Deb & husband Randy

I talked with Deb yesterday afternoon the update is as follows: 

The Drs. have begun the process of bringing Randy out of the drug-induced coma that he has been in for the past 3 weeks since the accident.   They have told the family that everyone reacts differently to this process - some come out of it quickly - others slowly.  She said yesterday he yawned, began moving around some, - which are all good signs.  

Deb is changing her routine this week to be down there from morning until mid-afternoon and then Randy's family will be there for the late afternoon/evening visitations.   They want to make certain that some family member is there when he does wake up.

On Wednesday the Dr. plans to take him off the respirator to see  how he reacts to that and how much he can breathe on his own.   This is scary to Deb, but she says his Dr. is very aggressive in treatment and says it needs to happen.

Deb seems to be holding up pretty well under the circumstances, and when I asked her if she needed anything, she just said to tell everyone to "keep praying".

In addition to the situation with Randy, Deb is trying to get Jackie, who is a senior this year, ready for college entrance/scholarship applications and Mattie, who is a junior, prepared for SAT testing.  

We are "holding down the fort" here with her ITA responsibilities with our part-time college girls who are stepping up to the plate very nicely.

January 31, 2009

Sheriff Marty Talbert wants law requiring repossession

agents to notify police prior to taking property

KOKOMO---Police often respond to vehicle thefts, write up reports and investigate only to find the vehicle in question had been repossessed.

The Howard County Sheriff Department calls the process a waste of time and resources, and wants it changed.

To that end, Sheriff Marty Talbert contacted state legislators looking to make notification required by law.

The effort resulted in Senate Bill 174, which would require a repossession agent to contact law enforcement prior to taking possession of a vehicle or watercraft.

“This idea was suggested by Special Deputy Tom DiNardo after listening to an officer respond to a reported vehicle theft,” Sheriff Marty Talbert said.

“After the officer took the stolen vehicle report and began completing an initial investigation, it was discovered the vehicle was repossessed overnight, not stolen,” Talbert said. “There is currently no requirement to notify law enforcement that a repossession has or is going to take place.”

The bill would require a repossession agent to contact the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction either before but not later than one hour after taking possession of the vehicle or watercraft. The agent would be required to provide his identity, as well as information concerning the description of the vehicle or watercraft repossessed, the owner’s information, and the location of vehicle or watercraft.

“It would just seem common sense to notify the police under these circumstances, but it doesn’t always happen,” said Talbert. “We are going to see more repossessions occurring with this struggling economy, and after we began talking to other sheriffs, we found that virtually every sheriff department statewide has dealt with this same issue.”

Talbert contacted State Representative Ron Herrell, D-Kokomo, State Sen. Jim Buck, R-Kokomo, and State Sen. Jimmy Arnold, a former two-term LaPorte County sheriff, about the legislation.

“Former Sheriff Arnold had been through this same thing before, so he went right to work drafting a bill,” said Talbert.

The bill passed a Senate Correction Committee hearing Tuesday morning with a 9-0 vote, said Talbert.

Next, Herrell said, the bill will go through the Senate process for a second reading, where legislators can either put amendments on the bill, or pass it. From there, the bill will go back to the Senate for a third meeting, then to the House.

“The bill would require repossession agencies at least give notification to police before they repossess any property,” said Herrell, who said he filed a similar bill in the House. “I think it’s a good policy.

“I would think it will pass, unless something happens to it.”

If the bill passes, failure to notify a law enforcement agency of repossession will be a Class C infraction, punishable by a fine of up to $500. There is no jail time associated with infractions.

Last year, the Howard County Sheriff Department was largely responsible for legislative action that eliminated the requirement that notices of sheriff sales be posted in three public locations within the township where the property was located.

“That requirement was antiquated, unnecessary and very time consuming,” said Talbert. “Major Steve Rogers testified before the legislative committees that eventually approved last years bill.”

January 30, 2009

The Evansville Area Retiree’s Lunch

The Evansville Area Retiree’s will be meeting for a Bi Monthly Luncheon on Tuesday, February 3 at 11:00 AM (Evansville Time).  The location is at CJ’s Restaurant, at the Willow Lanes Bowling Alley.  It is located on Virginia Street just east of US 41.  Those ISP not yet retired are welcome too.  Come join us.

January 29, 2009

Health update on retired trooper Richard Scott PE 2445

I talked to Richard Scott, retired ISP and two term Sheriff of Crawford County, this evening.  He got home from the hospital today.  He had 60 % of one of his lungs removed.  He is resting comfortably at home and goes back to his doctor in a couple of weeks to see how they are going to proceed.  I know he will appreciate hearing from old friends. 

*****************************

Updates on Aubrey Anderson

Aubrey's journal on caring bridge website

http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/aubreyanderson1

For those of you who would like to follow the progress of little Aubrey Anderson (2-1/2 yr old daughter of Toll Road Trooper Caleb Anderson, who is being treated for leukemia), you can go to the website listed above.  You can also sign up to receive updates on Aubrey's progress if you wish.   Please keep this "trooper family" in your prayers during this long treatment process.

January 26, 2009

Three State Highway Workers Find Cash In Excess of $100,000

PENDLETON---Three Indiana State Highway workers that were picking up old tires and debris along Interstate 70 in Hancock County were astonished to find well in excess of $100,000 cash.  As the State Highway workers picked up abandoned tires one tire fell partially apart and revealed the enormous amount of cash.  The State Highway workers called the Indiana State Police at 1:36 p.m. and Detective Mitch Blocher met with them at the scene.

Indiana State Police Detective Mitch Blocher stated the money was located on the north side of Interstate 70 west bound in a ditch just west of the Mt. Comfort Road Exit.  According to Detective Blocher the money was very wet and will have to be dried before the final total amount is determined.  According to Detective Sergeant Keith O’Donnell the tire appears to be from a large truck and may have been at the location for awhile. 

The money found inside the tire was packaged consistently with the way drug money is packaged.  Indiana State Trooper Dennis Wade met with investigators and his drug detection K-9 did alert on the money.

Detective Sergeant Keith O’Donnell stated, “These three Indiana State Highway workers are to be commended for their honesty and professionalism.”   O’Donnell believes the final money count may be well in excess of $100,000.   

This is an active criminal investigation and no more will be released at this time.  As the case progresses and arrests are made more information will be forthcoming.

Investigated by:  Detective Sergeant Keith O’Donnell

Assisted by:        Indiana State Police Detective Mitch Blocher, State Police Crime Scene Investigator Sergeant Len Langland, Master Trooper Tim Denny, Evidence Clerk Ann DeVries.     

*******************************************

 SOUP & DESSERT LUNCH FUNDRAISER

TO BENEFIT AUBREY ANDERSON

 WHEN: FRIDAY, JANUARY 30TH

WHERE: CAFETERIA

TIME: NOON

DETAILS: WE NEED VOLUNTEERS TO DONATE CROCK POTS OF SOUPS/CHILIS AND/OR DESSERTS. IF YOU WANT TO HELP OUT PLEASE LET ME KNOW!!! WE WILL NOT BE SETTING A DOLLAR AMOUNT FOR THE FOOD, WE JUST ASK THAT YOU DONATE WHATEVER AMOUNT YOU WANT TO - TO GO TOWARDS HELPING WITH MEDICAL EXPENSES FOR AUDREY & HER FAMILY.

January 23, 2009

Update of Deb's husband...

I spoke with Deb this afternoon and Randy is showing some slight signs of improvement in the pneumonia.  They did X-Ray's yesterday and they did show some improvement.  It is just very slow.  She did say that the pelvis is healing, but it was very badly broken.  At least when he is in the coma, he is not in any pain and his body is being allowed to heal.

She still asks for continued prayer for she and the girls as well as Randy's family.

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ITA's "Just Because" Program

From time to time in our daily walk in life, situations arise that are totally out of our control.  These include: personal or family illness/accident, loss of home, injuries that cause long-term absences from our jobs and family situations that cause unexpected financial burdens on our members.

For many years, the ITA has provided a program that steps in and assists members - and their families - during this time of personal crisis.   This program is called our "Just Because" Program.

Recipients of the "Just Because" donation are provided to the ITA Board of Directors from other members of the ITA, fellow ISP officers, and sometimes from the general public.  Verification of the need is provided prior to the check being issued.

A check is delivered by one of the ITA board members to the recipient or their family member.  While the amount of the donation varies according to the circumstances, generally the amount is $500.00.

Our donation helps the family with personal expenses in their time of need - and lets them know that we do care - "just because".

January 22, 2009

Trooper Busts Would-Be Burglars At Neighbor's Home

3 Men Arrested In Burglary

RUSHVILLE---An Indiana state trooper's attention to detail is being credited with the arrest of three men in connection with the burglary of his neighbor's home.

Trooper Chris Yeend was patrolling rural Rush County not far from him home Wednesday afternoon when he noticed a strange vehicle in a neighbor's driveway, said state police Sgt. John Bowling.

After turning around, he said he noticed that the black SUV with three people inside had backed up to the home's front door. As Yeend pulled into the driveway and called for backup, the three men took off running.

Yeend caught one of the men as he ran across a nearby field. Troopers from the Connersville post set up a perimeter in the area and a state police helicopter helped search from above.

The two other men were apprehended within 15 minutes, Bowling said.

Josh Elliot, 23, of Shelbyville; Joshua A. Jones, 19, of Shelbyville; and Anthony Tyler, 19, of Manila, were arrested and preliminarily charged with burglary of a residence, residential entry and resisting law enforcement fleeing.

Bowling said more charges could be filed in the case.

January 20, 2009

Update of Deb's husband...

I talked to Deb this morning and Randy remains about the same.  Still in drug-induced coma; still dealing with the pneumonia.  They had to replace the trach with another one as the original one was leaking, but were able to put in a larger tube and they say that is a good thing to help the pneumonia.   He is still in the Parkview ICU Trauma Unit.

Deb is grateful to all of her friends who have called and send cards of encouragement.  As we all know, Deb is a strong woman of faith and she shared that her faith in God is what is sustaining she and Randy's family through this ordeal. 

So, keep praying for them and I'll update you as I have more information to share.

January 16, 2009

As reported by retired F/Sgt Dick Ludlow

Lonnie Williams the man who was serving 2 life sentences for killing Tpr. John Streu and St John Marshall James Larimer on Feb 20 1971 has died at the Westville Cor. Center on Jan 7.  He had tried dozens of times for clemency or parole but did not get it. His partner John Lee is still there serving a life sentence. As a classmate and room-mate of John Streu I am very happy to see that he never got out of prision. Many people will continue to opose the upcoming hearings for Mr. Lee.  

January 15, 2009

Karen Shelton provides an update on the Deb Deuter Speidell family

Just talked to Deb at Parkview.  Randy's surgery yesterday went well.  He has developed some pneumonia and they are treating him for that.   Today at 2:30pm they will be taking him back to surgery to put in a trach for breathing and removing him from the respirator.  The doctors told Deb that they don't like to keep patients on the respirator for long periods of time because of the irritation it causes.

Even though it will be a long recovery process, Deb says the doctors are very optimistic that he will make a full recovery.

Please keep all of them in your prayers.

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The Indiana Troopers Association is pleased to announce the appointment

of two new board members effective January 1, 2009

PIO/Sergeant Mike Burns, PE 3689, Pendleton District was appointed to the board on January 1, 2009 to represent Area V (Pendleton, Indianapolis and Putnamville Districts).

Burns is a native of Flora, Indiana and graduated from Ball State in 1971.  He served in the U.S. Marines from 1971-1973 and taught school from 1973 to 1979 at Southwestern of Shelby County. 

Burns graduated from the Indiana State Police Academy on 8/19/79 and was assigned to the Pendleton Post, where he has served for 29 years.

He and his wife, Jane have two sons, Matt and Steve.  Steve has followed in his father's path, graduating from the ISP Academy in 2006 and now also serving at the Pendleton Post.  Matt is employed by the Cancer Center at IU Med Center.  Matt and his wife are the parents of Mike and Jane's two grandchildren, Madison, 9 and A.J. who is 6.

Retired Master Trooper Marshall (Marty) Talbert, PE 3357 has accepted the appointment to the board representing Retirees. 

Marty was appointed to the ISP on 12/18/77.  He was assigned to the Toll Road and later transferred to the Peru Post.  He served as a road trooper as well as PIO/Sergeant of the Peru Post.  He retired from the ISP on 12/31/02 to seek the office of Sheriff of Howard County.  Currently, he is in his second term as Howard County Sheriff.

Born in Tipton, Indiana, he was raised in Kokomo and graduated from Northwestern High School in 1974 and graduated from Indiana University/Kokomo in 1983.  Marty is the son of Alice Talbert and the late Dale Talbert and has three sisters and one brother.  He is married to Linda and has a stepdaughter, Amanda and is active in many community activities, serving on a number of board and committees.

Talbert will represent all ISP Retirees in his position on the board of directors, which is a perfect fit with his current position as President of the ISP Pioneers.

The ITA Board of Directors is honored to have the expertise of these two loyal and dedicated law enforcement officers as members of the board.

January 14, 2009

Brandi Peltz case turned over to state police

ARGOS---At the request of the Marshall County Prosecutor’s Office, the 1986 murder investigation of 11-year-old Brandi Peltz in Argos has been turned over to the Indian State Police.

According to a press release issued by the ISP Monday, the state police received the case file and evidence for the first time Friday.

 The Marshall County Sheriff’s Office was the original investigating agency.

The matter was brought to the forefront within the past few months after the publication of the book “The Passerby.”

Although the book was written as a fiction novel, the author, Thomas Crowel, used information that he gathered in the Argos community on the 20-year-old case as a basis for his book, which has sold more than 500 copies at The BookWorm in Plymouth. There have also been additional sales over the Internet.

Crowel said he first became aware of the case when he noticed the headstone of the murdered child in the graveyard in Argos. Crowel had family members in the community at one time.

Newspaper accounts of the Peltz case that were written at the time of the event indicated that the child was found strangled in her home and the body was found in a bathtub when firefighters were responded to a call that there was a fire at the house located south of Argos. The case has never been solved.

A group of residents of the Argos along with others who lived in the area at the time of the event have scheduled a meeting for Sunday, Jan. 25 at 2 p.m. at the B & R Building in Argos. Organizers, who asked not to be identified, say they have been told that it might take a whole community-wide effort to have a new investigation started. Crowel said he intends to be at the meeting.

Monday, Crowel said, “I’m thrilled that something is being done. I’ve waited two and a-half years for this to happen. I have offered any information that I researched to the police.”

Crowel said he interviewed people from all over the area in the hope of finding answers to the unknown circumstances that he contends were never fully investigated.

All of the profits from the book are being given to charities, according to Crowel.

He said, “It cost thousands to complete the investigations that even included a trip to England, but the cost isn’t my main concern. My interest has always been to find out who killed this little girl.”

The state police are asking for the public's help. Anyone with information about the Peltz murder is urged to call Indiana State Police Detective Tom Littlefield at 574-546-4900.

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Karen Shelton provides an update on the Deb Deuter Speidell family. 

Hopefully you will have time to send Deb a card.

Karen Shelton spoke with Deb last night for an update on her husband, Randy.   She said they had to postpone the pelvis surgery scheduled for today because he developed a fever yesterday after they tried to feed him thru his IV.   It is now scheduled for Wednesday.

He is in a drug-induced coma at the present time.   His injuries that they are aware of are two punctures in his lungs, broken ribs, collarbone and pelvis.   He is not believed to have any head injuries.

He is in the trauma unit at Parkview Main Hospital and they have advised Deb that he will be there for a long time.

Deb sustained a cut on her forehead that required several stitches and Maddie had bruised knees.  Deb says they are all doing OK.

Deb is a strong Christian lady, but she really can use our prayers right now.   She has to maintain the home with the two girls, arrange for a rental car until she can get a replacement vehicle. 

I have told her not to worry about her job here - that we will do what is needed until she is able to return.

She says the state police folks have been great with them.  They took excellent care of them the night of the accident and have told her to call upon them if they need anything else.   I was so glad Chaplain Steve Eckert was there.....he kept me up to date throughout the night Friday night.

I'll provide updates as I get them.

January 10, 2009

Deb Deuter Speidell of the ITA in serious accident

Deb Deuter Speidell of the ITA was in a serious accident last night with her daughter and husband.  Deb has a small cut to the head and her daughter has a bump on the knee.  Her husband Randy Speidell has broken ribs and a collapsed lung.  He was transported to Parkview Hospital in Ft. Wayne. 

A/Chaplain Steve Eckert District 22

January 09, 2009

ISP Honor Guard

INDIANAPOLIS---After about eight long years of what seemed to be an uphill battle, the Department, under Supt. Whitesell, now has an Honor Guard.  Each district has an HG team, as well as an HG team for Motor Carrier Inspectors and Capitol Police Officers.  The retirees should be made aware that there is a Level III funeral service available to all retired troopers, motor carrier inspectors, and capitol police officers should any retiree or his/her family request such service upon the death of the retiree.  The Level III service includes:  a one officer casket watch, a marked ISP commission or motorcycle for a motorcade (possibly several if several units attend the funeral service), and a two or four person flag folding detail and bugler for gravesite services.

The teams are going through the training process now and are being trained by two troops well versed and well experienced in semi-military funeral protocol.  I think this would be a very impressive and fitting tribute to any deceased ISP retiree.  

January 04, 2009

This just in from Donna at Pendleton

I don't normally send out good emails but I have been trying lately.

I have one request for prayers.

Please send your prayers to Virginia "Ginny" Kelley PE3768.

She is the Communications Supervisor at Peru Post.

Ginny has a tumor on her pancreas which was thought to be benign.

However, we found out today that it is cancer and has gone to her liver.

Ginny has been very positive and upbeat during all the tests.

She has been with the department for almost 25 years.

Please keep her in your prayers.

Love to all of you - young and old,

Donna

January 01, 2009

HAPPY NEW YEAR

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